Category Archives: Viral disease

Invasive MOSQUITO threatens southern CALIFORNIA with exotic viruses ~ CALIFORNIA county issues HANTAVIRUS ALERT ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE reports third HUMAN CASE of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and second EEE fatality ~ GEORGIAN scratched by RABID STRAY CAT.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

California 10/16/14 capitalpress.com: Officials have confirmed that the black-and-white striped Aedes aegypti or yellow fever mosquito was found last week in Commerce and Pico Rivera east of Los Angeles. Last year the species was found in other parts of the state including the Central Coast and Central Valley. The mosquito is aggressive, is active during daylight hours, and is capable of transmitting the yellow, dengue and chikungunya fever viruses, though none of these diseases have been reported in Los Angeles County. – See http://www.capitalpress.com/California/20141016/yellow-fever-mosquito-reaches-southern-california

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse

Deer mouse

California 10/17/14 San Diego County News Center: Media Release – A North American deer mouse trapped in routine monitoring in a rural part of Fallbrook has tested positive for hantavirus, and County officials are reminding people to be careful if they ever have to clean up mice or rodent nests. The mouse was the seventh rodent caught this year in the county to test positive for hantavirus, a disease that can be fatal. People have very little chance of being exposed to hantavirus, despite the fact that it is common in San Diego County, as long as wild rodents stay in the wild and don’t get inside homes, garages, sheds and cabins. However, people can be exposed if they sweep or vacuum places where infected rodents have nested. That’s because hantavirus can be inhaled if people disturb areas where dust from infected rodents, dried saliva, urine or feces can be “kicked up” into the air. “The best way to protect yourself is to avoid exposure,” said County Department of Environmental Health Director Elizabeth Pozzebon. “But if you have to clean an area where rodents have been don’t sweep or vacuum. Use wet-cleaning methods.” – For complete article and precautions see http://www.countynewscenter.com/news/deer-mouse-fallbrook-tests-positive-hantavirus

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

eee-threat-249x187New Hampshire 10/15/14 NH Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials confirm the third human case of EEE in an adult resident of Manchester in Hillsborough County. The individual died in mid-September and is the second EEE-related fatality in the state so far this year. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2014/10-oct/10152014eeecase.htm

RABIES:

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAGeorgia 10/17/14 Madison County: A stray cat that scratched the owner of property located in the 80 block of Gatewood Drive in Colbert on Oct. 4th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/7241-Colbert-woman-scratched-by-rabid-cat.html

CANADA: HUNTER mauled by GRIZZLY and shot by friend in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ TEXAS HEALTHCARE WORKER infected with EBOLA ~ Current EBOLA outbreak believed due to consumption of BAT meat ~ CDC predicts CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS will spread in U.S. ~ MAINE reports first ever HUMAN case of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and heavy increase in ANAPLASMOSIS cases ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, IL & SD ~ RABIES reports from AL & NJ.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

British Columbia 10/12/14 globalnews.ca: by Negar Mojtahedi – A 56-year-old man has been transported by air ambulance to Calgary’s Foothills hospital after he was mauled by a grizzly bear and shot by his friend while hunting near Fernie, British Columbia. Early Sunday morning, conservation officers and emergency crews responded to reports of grizzly bear attack in the Elk Valley. “This is a somewhat remote area and there’s no history with this bear,” said Sgt. Cam Schley, a conservation officer from Cranbrook. The victim’s hunting partner shot and killed the 400 pound male grizzly bear. In the process, he accidentally shot his friend. His injuries are the result of being mauled by the animal and from gunfire. The victim’s hunting partner was not injured by the grizzly bear.

sebcmapDavid Karn, a spokesman for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, says the victim was in stable condition when he left the area. He is currently at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and is now believed to be in critical condition. The two men were not hunting grizzly bears. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1611225/grizzly-bear-attack-in-fernie/

EBOLA VIRUS:

EBOLA-texas-us-flag-monitorTexas 10/12/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A female healthcare worker who was involved in the care of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus. The unidentified worker, who was among those monitoring themselves for possible symptoms, developed a fever Friday night and told medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Less than 90 minutes later, the worker was in an isolation unit at the hospital, having driven to the facility, according to Daniel Varga, MD, the chief clinical officer at Texas Health Resources. A close contact of the worker is also “proactively” in isolation, Varga told reporters at a media briefing in Dallas. In a subsequent briefing, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said investigators believed the worker had only the one contact during the period when she may have been infectious. Varga said the patient and her contact are being cared for in a 24-bed intensive care unit that had been cleared for use by possible Ebola patients. He said he could not discuss the other aspects of the care of the patient. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins the county’s chief executive, said blood tests at the state reference laboratory in Austin, using polymerase chain reaction methods, showed the worker has Ebola. A second test, at the CDC, has not yet confirmed the finding, he said, but “unfortunately, we’re confident it will be.” Frieden said results of the confirmatory test were expected later on Sunday. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Ebola/48054?isalert=1&uun=g632000d2324R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-10-12

Straw colored fruit  bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Straw colored fruit bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Global 10/09/14 ibtimes.co.uk: by Hannah Osborne – People in Ghana eat bats because it is a readily available source of protein as well as being a luxury food, researchers have found. Experts at the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London were looking to find out why ‘bushmeat’ is so popular in the West African country despite the risks involved. Like many infections, Ebola is likely to have arisen from human interaction with wild animals. The current outbreak, which has killed almost 4,000 people, is believed to have come from hunting and eating bats. Researchers surveyed almost 600 people across Ghana to find out why the practice is so prevalent, despite the risks involved. Hunting and eating bats can lead to infection of ‘zoonotic’ pathogens, with the creatures in particular known for hosting more viruses than any other mammal. Transmission occurs from bites, scratches, bodily fluids, tissue and excrement.

Cambridge LogoFrom surveying hunters, vendors and bat meat consumZoological_Society_of_London_(logo)ad been bitten and scratched. None reported using protective equipment, such as gloves. Four of those interviewed said people fight over bats, sometimes lying over the animal while it was still alive to stop others from taking it – often resulting in injury. Bats were prepared and cooked in a variety of ways, with the most common being to smoke them and putting them in soup. Researchers said it appears bat bushmeat is both a source of sustenance and luxury food, as many hunters said they would keep their catches for themselves. Consumers reported high taste ratings and relatively high prices, suggesting it is a sought-after product. – For complete article see http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak-why-do-people-eat-bat-meat-1469295

CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS (CHIKV):

aaCDC-LogoWestern Hemisphere 10/07/14 cdc.gov: Media Release – Since the chikv outbreak began in December 2013, nearly 750,000 cases have been reported in the Caribbean and Central, South and North America. In the United States, 1,200 travelers have imported the virus to the United States, and 11 locally transmitted cases have been reported in Florida as of September 30. The mosquitoes that can transmit chikv are common in many parts of the Americas, including the United States. CDC anticipates that the virus will continue to spread to new areas in the Americas. In the United States, CDC experts believe chikv will behave like dengue virus. Imported dengue cases have led to small, sporadic local transmission in the continental United States but have not led to widespread outbreaks. – See http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p1006-chikungunya-in-americas.html

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

EEE54fgh84Maine 10/10/14 pressherald.com: A York County resident over 60 has been identified as the state’s first human case of EEE since Maine began testing for the virus in 1964. The individual fell sick in late July and was hospitalized in August, first in Maine and later in Massachusetts, but has since returned home to recuperate.- For complete article see http://www.pressherald.com/2014/10/10/first-maine-resident-tests-positive-for-eee/

ANAPLASMOSIS:

tickPreview2Maine 10/11/14 outbreaktoday.com: According to state health officials there have been 133 cases of anaplasmosis reported in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 94 cases reported during the same time period last year. That’s an increase of 39 cases, or more than 40% with three months remaining in the year. Nationally, the number of anaplasmosis cases reported to the CDC has increased from 348 cases in 2000, to 1,761 cases in 2010. The disease is tick-borne and people get the infection when bitten by an infected deer tick, the same one involved in the transmission of Lyme disease. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-reports-dozens-more-anaplasmosis-cases-compared-to-2013-2013/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 10/08/14 CA Dept of Health: Media Release - There were 60 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Glenn (1), Kern (2), Kings (1), Los Angeles (18), Orange (15), Riverside (4), San Bernardino (2), San Joaquin (2), Santa Clara (1), Stanislaus (3), Sutter (2), Tehama (1), Tulare (1), and Yolo (5). 16 WNV-related fatalities have been reported in to CDPH from in nine local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (1), Los Angeles (2), Orange (4), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). 488 human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

3495411871-1Illinois 10/07/14 DuPage County Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a female resident of Hanover Park in her 40s is the first fatality in the county due to WNV. State officials report two previous deaths due to WNV this year. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/WNVdeath2014

SDdhSouth Dakota 09/30/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 49 human cases of WNV statewide in 25 counties. – See Page 3at https://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Sept2014.pdf

RABIES:

Alabama 10/07/14 Covington County: A coyote found about three miles 1_62_coyote_snarlsouth of Andalusia in the Carolina community has tested positive for rabies.

New Jersey 10/07/14 dailyrecord.com: by Peggy Wright – A 69-year-old bow hunter from Cliffside Park used a knife and arrow to kill a rabid coyote that jumped him Sunday at the Black River Wildlife Management Area and a day earlier bit a bicyclist on Patriot’s Path, authorities said Tuesday. . . . The Cliffside Park man, whose name was withheld, was at the rear of the Archery Range at the management area on North Road when bitten around 12:55 p.m. on Sunday. State Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said the 34-pound male coyote “jumped” the man. Cris Cooke-Gibbs, the health officer for Chester and Washington townships, said the hunter was bitten on the face. – See http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/news/local/2014/10/07/cops-rabid-coyote-bit-two-chester-township/16847079/

CALIFORNIAN attacked by BOBCAT ~ DEER farm in IOWA is new CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE title holder ~ COLORADO warns HUNTERS of widespread TULAREMIA ~ RABIES reports from MD & VA.

Bobcat. Courtesy National Park Service.

Bobcat. Courtesy National Park Service.

California 10/02/14 keyt.com: by Claire Scholl and Tracy Lehr – A 65-year-old woman is recovering in the hospital from multiple bobcat bites and scratches to her hand, arm and neck. The attack occurred at the Alisal Guest Ranch at about 12:30 p.m. Thursday. State Department of Fish and Wildlife officers said the woman, who works at the ranch, was eating lunch at a picnic table around the corner from the ranch entrance when she was attacked. They did not know what she was eating, but they said she tried to push the bobcat away but the animal came back. Officers said the bobcat had mange and looked emaciated. They found the bobcat beneath a wooden bridge nearby and killed it. Ranch guests said they heard a shot fired. They saw the dead animal and said it looked like it may have been in poor health before the incident. Some people think the drought is pushing animals out of the hills to search for food and water. The ranch is in the 1000 block of Alisal Road just a few miles from Solvang. – For video and complete article see http://www.keyt.com/news/woman-attacked-by-bobcat-while-eating-lunch/28377576

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD):

HEADERIowa 10/04/14 jsonline.com: by Paul A. Smith – In the world of deer hunting, records are kept of antler size, deer harvests and license sales. States and hunters often claim bragging rights. There’s a flip side, too. News came Thursday that Iowa claimed a dubious title previously held by Wisconsin. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced 284 of 356 deer (80%) from a captive herd in north-central Iowa tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The finding represents the highest number of CWD-positive animals detected at a facility, according to wildlife health officials. “This is what happens when you allow disease to sit and percolate on a game farm,” said Bryan Richards, the CWD project leader at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison.

Deer with CWD.

Deer with CWD.

A deer farm near Portage, Wis., is infamous for having 60 of 76 deer test positive for the disease in 2006. Wisconsin purchased the farm in order to keep fences in place and prevent wild deer from entering the property. However, in 2013 a wild deer near the facility tested positive for the disease. To help combat the spread of CWD, Wisconsin has banned baiting and feeding of deer in 35 counties and requires CWD tests on all animals that die on deer and elk farms. CWD is a progressive, degenerative neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose. There is no known treatment. CWD is similar to other prion diseases including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) and human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. CWD has not been linked to human illness, but the Centers for Disease Control recommends humans not consume meat from CWD-positive animals. – For complete article see http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outdoors/iowa-deer-farm-riddled-with-chronic-wasting-disease-b99364005z1-278133231.html

TULAREMIA:

tularemia-pueblo-county-jpgColorado 10/01/14 CO Dept of Public Health: Media Release – October is the beginning of small game hunting season in Colorado. As the number of human tularemia cases in our state continues to rise, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reminds small game hunters to “hunt healthy” this year.  “We haven’t seen this many tularemia cases in Colorado since the 1980s,” said State Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Jennifer House. “Historically, we see cases of tularemia in hunters, and the disease is so widespread this year, we want to make sure our hunters understand the risks.” “In the last 10 years Colorado has averaged three human cases of tularemia a year,” Dr. House said. “So far in 2014 we have had 11, and additional suspected cases are under investigation.”

zoonosis_TularemiaLocal health departments have received numerous reports of rabbit and rodent die-offs across the state this year. Animals from 12 counties tested positive for tularemia, a bacterial disease that can affect small game animals. It commonly causes illness and death in rabbits and rodents such as squirrels. People can get tularemia if they handle infected animals or are bitten by ticks or deer flies. People also can be exposed to tularemia by touching contaminated soil, drinking contaminated water or inhaling bacteria. Hunters are most at risk when skinning game and preparing and consuming the meat. – For precaution and complete release see https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news/tularemia-hunters

RABIES:

Maryland 10/01/14 Baltimore County: A male, gray-striped tabby cat, possibly with a limp, found in the vicinity of Delight Road in Reisterstown has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wbaltv.com/news/cat-5731289-very-cute-child-with-a-cat-in-armsfrom-reisterstown-area-tests-positive-for-rabies/28357964

Virginia 10/01/14 Warren County: A domestic short hair orange tabby cat with white feet and white belly that attacked a person on Fletcher Street near the Happy Creek Bike Trail in Front Royal on September 29th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.nvdaily.com/news/2014/10/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies.php

CDC confirms MAN in TEXAS first in U.S. diagnosed with EBOLA VIRUS ~ MISSOURIAN dies of RABIES ~ FLEAS on dead PRAIRIE DOG in ARIZONA positive for BUBONIC PLAGUE ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from WASHINGTON.

oLTXG4wTEXAS 09/30/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A man in intensive care in Dallas is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in U.S., the CDC said. The man, who flew from Liberia Sept. 19 and arrived in Dallas Sept. 20, is “critically ill” at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, according to CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD. . . . Frieden said the man was checked for fever before getting on his U.S.-bound flight Sept. 19 and had no symptoms until Sept. 24. He did not give details of the flight, saying there was no risk to other passengers because Ebola is not infectious in its asymptomatic phase. Frieden and other health officials also did not give details of the man’s activities between Sept. 26, when he first sought care, and Sept. 28 when he was admitted to Texas Health Presbyterian. . . The Ebola outbreak has been raging in West Africa for several months, after it was first recognized in March. In the three hardest-hit countries — Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone — the virus has caused 6,553 infections and 3,083 deaths, according to the latest situation report from the World Health Organization. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/45296

Author’s Note: Because Ebola can be transmitted from animals to people it is classified as a zoonotic disease.

Excerpts from cdc.gov re Ebola Virus: Ebola, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare and deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains. Ebola can cause disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).

Ebola is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus. There are five identified Ebola virus strains, four of which are known to cause disease in humans: Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus); Sudan virus (Sudan ebolavirus); Taï Forest virus (Taï Forest ebolavirus, formerly Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus); and Bundibugyo virus (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). The fifth, Reston virus (Reston ebolavirus), has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.

Ebola viruses are found in several African countries. Ebola was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically in Africa.

The natural reservoir host of Ebola virus remains unknown. However, on the basis of evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is animal-borne and that bats are the most likely reservoir. Four of the five virus strains occur in an animal host native to Africa.

Because the natural reservoir host of Ebola viruses has not yet been identified, the manner in which the virus first appears in a human at the start of an outbreak is unknown. However, researchers believe that the first patient becomes infected through contact with an infected animal.

Symptoms of Ebola include:

  • Fever (greater than 38.6°C or 101.5°F)
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days. Recovery from Ebola depends on the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

When an infection does occur in humans, the virus can be spread in several ways to others. Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with

  • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, feces, vomit, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
  • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
  • infected animals
  • Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.

No specific vaccine or medicine (e.g., antiviral drug) has been proven to be effective against Ebola.

Symptoms of Ebola are treated as they appear. The following basic interventions, when used early, can significantly improve the chances of survival:

  • Providing intravenous fluids (IV)and balancing electrolytes (body salts)
  • Maintaining oxygen status and blood pressure
  • Treating other infections if they occur

Some experimental treatments developed for Ebola have been tested and proven effective in animals but have not yet been tested in randomized trials in humans.

RABIES:

Rabieslogo45179Missouri 09/29/14 abc17news.com: by Lindsey Henry – A 52-year-old Cole County man is dead after apparently contracting rabies. Family members told ABC 17 it all started about two weeks ago when John Emmerich of Eugene felt severe neck pain, began shaking, (had) trouble swallowing, and (had) hallucinations. Not long after that, he was admitted to University Hospital where he died last Friday. Family members said test results last week came back from the CDC and confirmed Emmerich had rabies. He died the following day. The Miller County Health Department said Missouri’s Health Department is investigating the cause of death. – For complete article see http://www.abc17news.com/news/cole-county-man-apparently-dies-after-being-infected-with-rabies/28324396

BUBONIC PLAGUE:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAArizona 09/30/14 kfyi.com: Health officials in Coconino County have confirmed that fleas from dead prairie dogs found in Flagstaff have tested positive for bubonic plague. – See complete article at http://www.kfyi.com/onair/arizona-news-55067/bubonic-plague-found-in-arizona-12816601

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

imagesWashington 09/30/14 yakimaherald.com: Health officials have confirmed a fourth human case of WNV contracted by a Yakima County woman in her 40s. Human cases of WNV have also been confirmed in each of three other locations in the state including Walla Walla and King counties, and Grays Harbor. – See http://www.yakimaherald.com/news/latestlocalnews/2541203-8/west-nile-virus-case-verified-in-yakima

CALIFORNIA WOMAN survives BLACK BEAR attack ~ Follow-Up Report: NEW HAMPSHIRE WOMAN looses battle with EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) ~ EEE report from NY ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CAx2, FL, KS, LA, MA, MS & NM ~ RABIES report from VA.

Black bear. Bing free use license.

Black bear. Bing free use license.

California 09/25/14 keyt.com: by John Palminteri – A Carpinteria Valley rancher was injured when she took on a 300-pound Black Bear Monday in what is called an “unprovoked” attack in an avocado grove. Emily Miles was on a walk around noon in Rincon Canyon near her home, when her two dogs bolted out of the trees followed by the bear. In moments the animal was on its hind legs and swinging at the woman who was trying to defend herself. Long red scratches on her back shows where  the bear claws shredded Miles’ shirt and tore her skin. Miles tried to get away, turning and running a short distance. That is when the bear chased her down, and took a bite into her upper left thigh. She hit the ground hard, breaking a rib and still vigorously turned over to kick towards the bear while screaming. “He took me down. He grabbed me. He sunk his teeth into my thigh and knocked me down,” said Miles. Blood was coming out of four puncture wounds from the bite, during the harrowing ordeal. “Looking at him, I knew he could kill me in an instant. He was probably 300 pounds and six feet tall standing,” said Miles. The bear reared back again, and Miles said the two stared eye to eye, before the animal came down on all fours, and slowly moved back into the trees.   After a few steps, the bear stopped and “walked away and kept looking back at me,” she said. – For video and complete article see http://www.keyt.com/news/breaking-woman-injured-in-bear-attack-on-a-carpinteria-valley-avocado-ranch/28232774

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

Follow-Up Report:

(See EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) report from NH posted 13 Sept 2014)

Eastern-Equine-EcephalitisNew Hampshire 09/24/14 conwaydailysun.com: by Tom Eastman – The Conway woman who was diagnosed with the EEE virus lost her battle with the disease Sept. 18 at the Gosnell Hospice House with her family by her side. Diane Catherine Humphreys, 51, of Haynesville Avenue in Conway, was diagnosed with the illness in August. The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services confirmed the diagnosis on Aug. 22. She was the first person in the state to be diagnosed with the mosquito-borne disease in five years. A second adult was diagnosed in early September in Hopkinton. That patient was recently discharged from the hospital, according to state epidemiologist Dr. Benjamin Chan, who spoke with The Conway Daily Sun Wednesday. – See http://www.conwaydailysun.com/newsx/local-news/116675-humphreys-51-of-conway-succumbs-to-eee

New York 09/24/14 citycentral.com: A second known human case of EEE in Onondaga County has been confirmed in a patient that is currently hospitalized. The first case was reported in August. – See http://www.cnycentral.com/news/story.aspx?id=1100809#.VCZFjRaOra4

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

disease%20cycleCalifornia 09/29/14 CA WNV: Officials have confirmed 375 human cases of WNV including 15 fatalities so far this year. – For individual county reports see http://westnile.ca.gov/

California 09/25/14 mercedsunstar.com: Merced County officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV. Both individuals were hospitalized but are recovering. – See http://www.mercedsunstar.com/2014/09/25/3868212_first-human-cases-of-west-nile.html?rh=1

Florida 09/23/14 FL Dept of Health Polk County: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the county’s first human case of WNV so far this year. The victim, a female resident of Lake Wales, is recovering. This is the seventh confirmed case in the state this year. – See http://www.mypolkhealth.net/pressreleases/

Kansas 09/26/14 kwch.com: Seven new cases of WNV have been reported statewide, according to the latest numbers from the Kansas Health Department. New cases have been reported in Barton, Comanche, Haskell and Pawnee counties. Four of the new cases are in Barton County, which now has two confirmed cases of the more serious neuro-invasive form of the disease. In total, 16 cases of WNV have been reported in Kansas so far this year. – See http://www.kwch.com/news/local-news/seven-new-cases-of-west-nile-confirmed-in-kansas/28275526

Louisiana 09/26/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 15 new cases of WNV, of which five were neuro-invasive disease infections, bringing this year’s total to 118 reported infections. This week’s new infections include five neuro-invasive disease cases in Ascension (1), Bossier (1), East Baton Rouge Parish (1), Ouachita (1) and Pointe Coupee (1) parishes. There were nine new cases of West Nile fever; these cases were in Caddo (3), East Baton Rouge (5) and La Fourche (1) parishes, and one new asymptomatic case in East Baton Rouge (1) parish. There were no new deaths reported this week. – See http://www.dhh.state.la.us/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3123

Massachusetts 09/23/14 MA Health & Human Services: Media Release – A female resident of Middlesex County in her 20s is the third human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The victim is recovering. – See http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/newsroom/press-releases/dph/third-human-case-of-west-nile-virus-in-mass-announced.html

Mississippi 09/29/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed three new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 40 cases including five deaths so far in 2014. The new cases were reported in Lowndes, Neshoba, and Rankin counties. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15640,341.html

New Mexico 09/23/14 therepublic.com: An 89-year-old Lea County man hospitalized for encephalitis has died of WNV. This is the state’s first WNV-related death this year, but eight human cases of WNV have been confirmed in the state so far this year. – See http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/e51b0f9fb38241f4b8cffb862e6e33a3/NM–West-Nile-Death-New-Mexico

RABIES:

cat-child66789Virginia 09/26/14 Grayson County: Two local residents are being treated following exposure to a feral cat that tested positive for rabies. An alert has been issued because there are other cats in this stray population. – See http://www.wvva.com/story/26636022/2014/09/26/rabid-cat-prompts-local-health-district-to-issue-rabies-alert

NEW JERSEY: Rutgers senior killed by BLACK BEAR ~ WYOMING hunter bitten by GRIZZLY ~ TENNESSEEAN killed by GRIZZLY in CANADA’S NORTHWEST TERRITORIES ~ Another COLORADAN gets TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from MS & TX

Courtesy Alaska Fish & Game Dept.

Courtesy Alaska Fish & Game Dept.

New Jersey 09/22/14 dailytargum.com: by Sabrina Szteinbaum – Darsh Patel, a Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences senior from Edison, New Jersey, was killed yesterday in a bear attack while hiking in the Apshawa Preserve in West Milford Township. President Robert L. Barchi emailed the University community yesterday informing it of the attack and sending thoughts and prayers to the 22-year-old’s family and friends. “I deeply regret to report that we learned this morning of the passing of another Rutgers student, Darsh Patel, a senior in the School of Arts and Sciences majoring in information technology and informatics,” Barchi said via email. “Darsh was killed in a bear attack yesterday while hiking with friends in a wooded area of Passaic County.”

apshawa preserve njBill Maer, the department spokesman for the Passaic County Sheriff’s Department, said a group of five hikers began the hike on the preserve. After a bear followed them, only four came out. After the hikers called the West Milford police, a search began for the missing hiker. Patel was found at around 5:54 p.m., according to nj.com. The sheriff’s office has ruled out foul play or criminal activity, and Maer said there were bear sightings in the general area where the hikers were yesterday. “We have not had a bear attack that I’m aware of in a long time, if ever,” Maer said. “Generally, there’s not much interaction between individuals and bears.” West Milford Police Chief Timothy Storbeck said the black bear was found and euthanized, according to nj.com. Larry Ragonese, the press director for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection said the last recorded bear attack in New Jersey was in 1852, and Sunday’s attack was “unique and unusual.” He also said West Milford is one of the most populated places in the state for black bears. – For complete article see http://www.dailytargum.com/article/2014/09/rutgers-senior-dies-in-bear-attack

bearspray8897Wyoming 09/22/14 trib.com: A grizzly bear bit a hunter in an attack in western Wyoming, sending him to a hospital with minor injuries, but officials said Monday they found no link to a bear that killed a man earlier this month. Two elk hunters surprised a female grizzly with two cubs Sunday just north of Dubois. The bear bit one of the hunters on the side, Wyoming Game and Fish Department Regional Wildlife Supervisor Jason Hunter said. The bow hunters fended off the animal with bear spray before one was treated for minor injuries at a hospital in Lander. Their names were not immediately available. Hunter said they did everything right by hunting in pairs and carrying bear spray. “The individuals knew what they were doing out there,” he said. – For complete article see http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/grizzly-bear-bites-hunter-in-wyoming/article_a7421f2b-38c9-5fa5-97a8-db4da1f6e234.html

Canada:

grizzlyattacking6657Northwest Territories 09/22/14 wctrib.com: by Tom Cherveny – A family with its roots in Renville County is mourning the loss of two brothers who died days apart, one in a tragic hunting accident. Ken Novotny, 53, of Germantown, Tennessee, died Wednesday when he was attacked by a grizzly bear while hunting southwest of Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada. Keith Novotny, 59, of Appleton, died Sunday. Friends said he was waiting for a kidney transplant. Their mother, Marjorie Novotny, learned the news of her second son’s death after reaching Tennessee to be with Ken Novotny’s family. He is survived by his wife, Brenda (Johnson), originally of Lake Lillian, and their three children.

mapNormanWellsNWTKen Novotny was hunting along the border with the Yukon when he was attacked by the bear, according to Dr. Cathy Menard, M.D., chief coroner for the Northwest Territories. The Commercial Appeal in Tennessee reported that a coach of the victim’s daughter said the bear “came out of nowhere” and attacked him as he was prepping a moose he had shot. The coroner said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police received a call for assistance from a guide accompanying Novotny on the hunt at 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Darkness and weather conditions prevented help from reaching the remote site in the Arctic that night. A helicopter reached the site the following morning. Novotny had died at the scene, according to the coroner. The guide was not harmed. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reported that the bear believed to have attacked Novotny was tracked and killed by staff with the Department of the Environment and Natural Resources. – For complete article see http://www.wctrib.com/content/friends-mourning-loss-former-olivia-grad-killed-grizzly-while-hunting-canada

TULAREMIA:

Media.aspx (2)Colorado 09/23/14 Weld County Dept of Public Health: Media Release – A Weld County resident living southeast of Erie was diagnosed with tularemia last week. The resident was hospitalized with a high fever, loss of appetite, and acute diarrhea and is now recovering at home. “This is the first human case of tularemia in Weld County this year” said Chery Darnell, Lab Manager for the Weld County Health Department. Additionally, a field mouse in northwest Johnstown and a rabbit southeast of Berthoud tested positive for tularemia. “We are seeing more than three times the usual number of human tularemia cases along the Front Range this year, so the public really needs to be cautious about not getting exposed to this disease,” said Darnell. – For complete release see http://www.co.weld.co.us/assets/2C80b9dbA1Ad162DDdab.pdf

Author’s Note: Officials have confirmed 10 human cases of tularemia in Colorado so far this year

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

wnv1_clip_image002Mississippi 09/22/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed two new deaths and 12 new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 37 human cases and five deaths so far this year. The deaths were reported in Lee and Coahoma counties. The new cases were reported in Adams, Carroll, Coahoma, Clarke, Forrest (2), Hinds (2), Jones, Lee, Monroe, and Washington counties.

imagesCAWX5STJTexas 09/22/14 texomashomepage.com.com: Wichita Falls health officials have confirmed two cases of WNV in the city. Area health professionals say a 48-year-old male was confirmed to be the first human case, while the second human case was a 19-year old male. The Centers for Disease Control lists people over 50 years old as those with the highest risk for the disease, but only about 1 in 150 people will develop severe symptoms. – See http://www.texomashomepage.com/story/d/story/two-cases-of-west-nile-confirmed-in-wichita-falls/12854/-uluDfCF_0SarcTSIhkFVw

COLORADO HIKERS use sticks to fend off MOUNTAIN LION ~ FLORIDA confirms 10th locally acquired case of CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CT, IL, LA, OH & TX ~ RABIES report from NC.

Mountain lion. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Mountain lion. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Colorado 09/17/14 steamboattoday.com: by Matt Stensland – A group of Steamboat Springs hikers has reported a scary, up-close encounter with a mountain lion that had them defending themselves with sticks. Robert Bowes was hiking with friends Jakub and Alyssa Dybala on Sunday afternoon on a trail off of Routt County Road 36 near the Strawberry Park Hot Springs. The trail runs near the Lower Bear Trail and gave them a direct route to Rocky Peak. As the group got close to the tree line, a mountain lion ran behind Bowes and Alyssa Dybala in front of Jakub Dybala. “We both turned around, and he’s pitch white,” Bowes said. “It threaded the needle between us. The dogs didn’t even see it because they were up front.” That was enough of a scare, but then the mountain lion returned and Jakub Dybala spotted it about 20 feet away. Bowes pulled out a small knife, and this time, the dogs went after the lion. He thought they were goners. “They were face to face with the mountain lion,” Bowes said. “It was showing its fangs and swatting at the dogs.” Bowes said the lion was large, with a tail the size of his arm span. With the cat hissing just feet away, Bowes said they were backed into a boulder, which they climbed onto. “The mountain lion jumps up onto the boulder with us all,” Bowes said. “He swiped at me, and I could feel the wind from his paws going past my leg.” After a good whack in the head with a small stick, the lion jumped off the boulder and scurried into the brush.

dog&mtnlion.8997“It was the most scary thing I’ve ever encountered,” Bowes said. He said the dogs returned, and they sprinted into a field making noise as they retreated, not knowing if they were being preyed upon. “That was the scariest part,” Bowes said. They made it back to their car without seeing the lion again. Local wildlife officer Justin Pollock learned about the incident, and he said it made him very concerned. He went to the Rocky Peak area to see if he could find any signs of the animal. He was unsuccessful and said the mountain lion’s aggressive behavior toward humans was unusual. “I can understand if it’s cornered and can’t get out,” Pollock said. “They’re going to avoid any confrontation.” Pollock said it was possible the mountain lion had kittens in a nearby den that it was trying to protect. – For complete article see http://www.steamboattoday.com/news/2014/sep/17/steamboat-springs-hikers-use-sticks-defend-selves-/

CHIKUNGUNYA:

AbledAlert-Global-OUTBREAK-Chikungunya-373x273Florida 09/20/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: The Florida Dept of Health/Broward County has confirmed a locally acquired case of Chikungunya Fever bringing the state total to 10 cases so far this year. The other nine indigenous cases have been reported from Palm Beach County (4), St. Lucie County (3) and Miami-Dade County (2). – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/broward-county-reports-locally-acquired-chikungunya-10th-case-in-florida-73169/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

th4334Connecticut 09/18/14 therepublic.com: The (CT) Department of Public Health has confirmed that a Stamford resident contracted (WNV) and has been treated and released from the hospital. The unidentified resident is the second person in Connecticut this season to test positive for the mosquito-borne virus. Anne Fountain, the city’s director of public health and social services, said the patient was a 39-year-old man. – See http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/bd410794da83414da37d88da52d2591d/CT–West-Nile-Virus

Illinois-Department-Public-HealthIllinois 09/18/14 IL Dept of Public Health: Media Release – Two residents in northern Illinois who became ill with WNV in late-August and early September have died. So far this year, a total of 15 human cases have been reported Cook, Kane, La Salle, Lake and McHenry counties. – See http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/press14/9.18.14_First_West_Nile_Virus_Related_Deaths_Reported_in_Illinois.htm

LA-DHHLouisiana 09/19/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 11 new cases of WNV, of which seven were neuroinvasive disease infections, bringing this year’s total to 103 reported infections. Included in the 11 new cases was one death in DHH Region 3, which includes St. Mary, St. James, St. John, St. Charles, Assumption, Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes. – See http://dhh.la.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3117

07cd7361057a7994e7e590e1fb0d3868ed6ff5ad-1Ohio 09/20/14 Mahoning County: A 66-year-old woman died on Sept 18th after being hospitalized with encephalitis caused by WNV. The victim was the first human case of WNV in the county so far this year. – See http://www.vindy.com/news/2014/sep/20/west-nile-virus-claims-first-victim-in-m/

080722_west_nile_generic (2)Texas 09/18/14 dallasnews.com: by Sherry Jacobson – Dallas County Health and Human Services confirmed the 8th human infection Thursday by the (WNV) for the 2014 season. The resident, who lives in the 75243 zip code in Dallas, was diagnosed with West Nile neuroinvasive Disease. For medical confidentiality and personal privacy reasons, DCHHS does not provide additional identifying information. . . . The latest West Nile infection was the second human case for 75243, which also has had three positive mosquito pools. – For complete article see http://thescoopblog.dallasnews.com/2014/09/dallas-county-confirms-8th-human-case-of-west-nile-virus.html/

RABIES:

rabiesAlert521d4-1North Carolina 09/19/14 Craven County: A black and white pit bull type puppy about 10 weeks old found by a trash dumpster between the former Carolina Grill restaurant and the U.S. Post Office on Highway 70 in Havelock has tested positive for rabies. Anyone exposed to this puppy in any way from August 29 thru Sept 18 should seek medical advice immediately. – See http://www.havenews.com/news/local-news/rabies-case-confirmed-in-havelock-1.375539