BEAVER attacks kayaker in upstate NEW YORK – ALASKAN victim of unprovoked GRIZZLY attack – HANTAVIRUS deaths in NEW MEXICO, NORTH DAKOTA & CANADA – ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER kills CALIFORNIAN – WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from AZ, CA, MS, MO & TN – RABIES reports from GAx3, MD, NJ, NYx2 & VT.

American Beaver. BING free use license.

American Beaver. BING free use license.

New York 06/16/14 Monroe County: A Lima resident is receiving post-exposure prophylactic rabies shots after a beaver jumped out of Irondequoit Creek in Rochester and attacked him, knocking him from his kayak and into the water. The victim was treated for bite wounds on his back and deep puncture wounds on his arm. A bystander responding to the commotion hit beaver2the beaver with a paddle several times before the animal let go and disappeared beneath the surface of the creek, and when it returned a few seconds later he hit it again, breaking the paddle. The beaver’s carcass was recovered and is being tested for the rabies virus.- See http://www.13wham.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/beaver-attacks-pulls-man-off-kayak-13005.shtml

Grizzly:

grizzly5Alaska 06/25/14 Valdez-Cordova Census Area: by Josh Staab – A Slana man was visiting a friend’s home Tuesday afternoon when Alaska State Troopers say he was suddenly attacked by an adult grizzly bear. The attack left the man — identified by troopers as 66-year-old Andre Siegenthaler — severely injured following the attack. Siegenthaler’s friend Ed Bullock, who had bought nails which Siegenthaler was stopping by to pick up, says the attack apparently occurred at about 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. “The bear attacked with no warning from behind a spruce tree, and even though Andre was carrying bear spray, the attack happened faster than Andre could react,” Bullock said. “Within two bounds the bear was on Andre.” Bullock gathered the information from Siegenthaler’s wife Briggita, who was with Siegenthaler after the attack occurred. According to Briggita’s account of the attack, Siegenthaler “suffered bites to his right hip area, both shoulders and arms; his left cheek was torn open, right ear mangled and nerve damage to the right cheek. Several neighbors in the area were called and came to Siegenthaler’s aid, Bullock said.

Valdez-Cordova Census Area

Valdez-Cordova Census Area

“(The Siegenthalers) live across the Slana River, so getting out to it is pretty restricted,” Bullock said. Alaska State Troopers spokesperson Beth Ipsen confirmed that the attack had occurred, but says troopers didn’t respond to the incident and have no firsthand information about what happened. “The only thing we did with it was correspond medical response,” Ipsen said. “We believe (Siegenthaler suffered) serious but non-life-threatening injuries.” – For complete article see http://www.ktuu.com/news/news/slana-man-medevaced-after-bear-attack/26665594

Hantavirus:

hantavirus1542New Mexico 06/17/14 San Juan County: Officials have confirmed that a 67-year-old female resident has died of Hantavirus, a rare disease spread by infected rodent droppings, urine and saliva. – See http://krqe.com/2014/06/17/hantavirus-claims-elderly-womans-life/

North Dakota 06/12/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials confirmed today that an adult resident from the central part of the state has died from complications related to Hantavirus. .- See http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-06-12-Hantavirus%20Death%20NR-PIO-v.FINAL.pdf

Canada:

Saskatchewan 06/24/14 swbooster.com: Health officials have confirmed the province’s first fatal case of Hantavirus in 2014 in an adult from the southern part of the province – See http://www.swbooster.com/News/Regional/2014-06-24/article-3775290/Hantavirus-death-reported-in-Southern-Saskatchewan/1

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF):

T_rmsf1 (2)California 06/25/14 Imperial County: Officials have confirmed that an unidentified resident has died of RMSF, which is a tick-borne disease. – See http://www.ivpressonline.com/news/local/local-death-attributed-to-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever/article_6dcb9fe1-bcd3-55f3-a8d0-97e9c09f3704.html

 

West Nile Virus (WNV):

thumbnailCAZ9PMJXArizona 06/14/14 Pinal County: Health officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the county, and perhaps the state, so far this year in a man from Casa Grande who is recovering. – See http://www.trivalleycentral.com/casa_grande_dispatch/area_news/pinal-co-reports-st-west-nile-case/article_38b1913e-f3ea-11e3-8bfc-001a4bcf887a.html

California 06/20/14 CA Dept of Public Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first two human cases of WNV in the state so far this year reported by Contra Costa and San Joaquin counties. The former person was hospitalized but has seen been released, and the latter tested positive but has not yet shown symptoms. – See http://www.cdph.ca.gov/Pages/NR14-058.aspx

Mississippi 06/02/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the state’s second human case of WNV so far this year. The most recent case is in Newton County. In February, a case was reported in Hinds County. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15273,341.html

Missouri 06/26/14 Laclede County: State health officials have confirmed that a 75-year-old male has died of suspected WNV. – See http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/health/first-west-nile-virus-death-reported-in-missouri/article_5ff352d8-f95a-5a5b-81ce-5db71502f9ab.html

Tennessee 06/24/14 TN Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The case involves a resident of Shelby County who is now recovering. – See https://news.tn.gov/node/12595

Rabies:

rabies.warningGeorgia 06/25/14 Wilkes County: A bobcat that attacked a pet dog in the Sandtown Road area of Washington last week has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.news-reporter.com/news/2014-06-26/Front_Page/Rabid_bobcat_killed_last_week_after_attacking_Sand.html

Georgia 06/24/14 Carroll County: A feral cat that bit an employee at Superior Industries on Columbia Drive in Carrollton on June 17th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.times-georgian.com/news/article_e29f43b0-fc11-11e3-b0fc-001a4bcf6878.html

Georgia 06/18/14 Chatham County: A feral kitten that has been in contact with a raccoon and at least six other feral cats in the Wilmington Island neighborhood has tested positive for rabies. The kitten was being fed by several residents in the Wilmington Park area.- See http://wjcl.com/2014/06/18/eight-exposed-to-rabies-on-wilmington-more-cases-expected/

Maryland 06/18/14 Frederick County: A feral cat that attacked a homeowner near Deer Crossing Elementary School in New Market on June 11th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.fredericknewspost.com/locations/local/frederick_county/frederick/cat-near-deer-crossing-elementary-tests-positive-for-rabies/article_d0e65e1c-f70f-11e3-972e-001a4bcf6878.html

New Jersey 06/25/14 Salem County: A stray cat that was taken in by an Upper Pittsgrove Township family in May has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.nj.com/south/index.ssf/2014/06/rabid_cat_bites_upper_pittsgrove_teen_say_salem_county_health_officials.html

New York 06/20/14 Onondaga County: A feral cat found near Downer Street in Van Buren has tested positive for rabies. Anyone who has been in contact with a feral cat in this vicinity, or whose outside pet might have been exposed, should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2014/06/feral_cat_in_van_buren_tests_positive_for_rabies.html

New York 06/06/14 Erie County: A sick cat found by children on the side of Cedar Road in Newstead has tested positive for rabies. – See http://wivb.com/2014/06/06/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies/

Vermont 06/23/14 Washington County: A small gray fox that attacked six people in Montpelier on June 21st has tested positive for rabies. Those bitten were in their yards in the vicinity of Derby, Colonial and Hillcrest drives. – See http://www.mychamplainvalley.com/story/d/story/fox-attacks-six-people-in-montpelier/38397/xC75qCTBlES0y41dYEQ3AQ

Celebrity WOLF OR-7 has fathered pups in OREGON – GRIZZLY attacks car on CANADIAN highway – TRAVEL WARNING: CDC places CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER on Level 1 Watch List in CARIBBEAN – MISSISSIPPI confirms second HUMAN case of WEST NILE VIRUS – NORTH DAKOTA confirms HANTAVIRUS fatality – RABID STRAY CATS found in NY & PA.

OR-7's pups. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

OR-7′s pups. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Wolf OR-7:

Oregon 06/04/14 chicoer.com: by Jeff Barnard – Oregon’s famous wandering wolf has fathered pups with a mate in the southern Cascade Range — the first confirmed wolf pack in those mountains since the 1940s, officials said today. Biologists made the determination after traveling Monday to a site on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest east of Medford, where photos and a GPS tracking collar showed the wolf known as OR-7 has been living with a mate. They saw two pups peering out from a pile of logs and may have heard more, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said. OR-7 and his mate were nowhere to be seen but could well have been nearby in the dense timber, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said. “It was pretty exciting seeing the pups,” he said. “OR-7 was probably off getting some food. We saw a couple deer (and elk) legs that had obviously been getting chewed on.” Scientists also saw some ground disturbance where the pack “clearly had been playing around,” Stephenson said. The discovery marked the farthest west and south a wolf pack has established itself since the animals were reintroduced in the Northern Rockies in the 1990s, he said. – For complete article see http://www.chicoer.com/breakingnews/ci_25897080/wandering-wolf-or-7-has-fathered-pups

Canada:

Grizzly Bear:

Not related to article. For size comparison only. National Geographic image.

Not related to article. For size comparison only. National Geographic image.

Alberta 06/12/14 huffingtonpost.ca: A female resident of Jasper reported that her vehicle was attacked by a GRIZZLY when she slowed down on Highway 16 to let two bears cross in front of her car. The female decided to cross, she said, and the male stopped so she proceeded slowly between them. The male charged her car hitting it full force and rocking it violently. “I could see his teeth, the drool on his face,” she said. She told The Fitzhugh, a Jasper newspaper, she heard the bear’s claws scrape against the metal of her car as he sped away. About a kilometer down the road she stopped and could see the bears chasing after her. She told the Edmonton Journal that repairing the dents left in the car’s side panels would cost about $5,500.00. Parks Canada confirmed a similar incident about an hour earlier near the same location and they suspect the same GRIZZLY was involved.  – For complete article and video see http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/06/12/grizzly-attacks-car-jasper_n_5488751.html

Travel Warning:        

Chikungunya Fever:

chikVCaribbean06/02/14 travelweekly.com: by Gay Nagle Myers -U.S. and Caribbean health officials report that chikungunya, a viral disease spread by the bite of an infected mosquito, now has reached 17 Caribbean countries with 4,406 confirmed cases and more than 103,000 suspected cases. The mosquito-borne disease first appeared in French St. Martin in December. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that Florida has reported 10 cases coming from travelers returning from Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Martinique and St. Maarten/Martin. To date, no case has been reported of people contracting the disease in Florida, “but there is a high likelihood, as we continue to monitor and investigate, that we will find some,” according to Roger Nasci, a CDC expert on vector-borne diseases. The CDC has placedchikungunya on its Level 1 Watch List in the Caribbean, urging travelers to follow precautions. The risk to travelers “is slightly above the baseline risk,” the CDC said. – For complete article see http://www.travelweekly.com/Caribbean-Travel/Mosquito-borne-illness-spreads-in-Caribbean/

West Nile Virus:

imagesGW02ZP9VMississippi06/05/14 vaccinenewsdaily.com: A second human case of West Nile virus (WNV) in the state this year had been confirmed. The WNV case was confirmed in NewtownCounty. The first case was confirmed in HindsCounty in February. “This serves as a powerful reminder of the importance of preventing mosquito exposures, particularly as we approach the historically active summer months,” Thomas Dobbs, an epidemiologist for MSDH, said. – See http://vaccinenewsdaily.com/medical_countermeasures/330914-second-west-nile-case-confirmed-in-mississippi/

Hantavirus:

504f618286f53_preview-300North Dakota06/12/14 ND State Health Dept: State officials have confirmed the death of an adult resident due to Hantavirus, which is found in the feces and urine of rodents and can be inhaled while cleaning poorly ventilated areas. No other information was provided. – See http://www.theolympian.com/2014/06/12/3178016/death-in-central-nd-attributed.html?sp=/99/988/

Rabies:

imagesPG7OKBFQNew York06/06/14ErieCounty: An apparently ill feral cat found by children on Cedar Road in Newstead has tested positive for rabies. No description of the cat was provided. – See http://wivb.com/2014/06/06/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies/

Pennsylvania06/06/14AdamsCounty: A feral cat that attacked a woman in the 400-block of Sibert Road in StrabanTownship has tested positive for rabies. No description of the cat was provided. – See http://www.gettysburgtimes.com/news/local/article_0098850e-2937-5739-bcc2-97ac223bc623.html

 

 

 

 

 

CANADIAN biker survives GRIZZLY attack when bear punctures can of pepper spray ~ OKLAHOMA’s first case of HEARTLAND VIRUS proves fatal ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE has highest incidence of LYME DISEASE ~ COLORADO confirms third case of HANTAVIRUS this year ~ OKLAHOMA confirms first case of HANTAVIRUS this year proves fatal ~ RABIES report from OHIO.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Canada:

Alberta 05/25/14 660news.com: A well-prepared mountain biker is recovering with minor injuries after a grizzly bear attack in Alberta. It happened Saturday night around 9:00 p.m. just outside the town of Jasper. Parks Canada Spokesperson Kim Weir said the cyclist was riding on a trail when he was charged by the bear and knocked off his bike. Fortunately when the biker was face down, there was a can of bear spray on his backpack. “So the bear actually pepper-spray-bearbit into the bear spray, punctured the can, the bear spray was deployed, the bear got it into his mouth and his eyes and so on and left the area,” she said. “The mountain biker had a cell phone so he then called for help.” Weir reminds all trail users in the mountains be make noise, to let wildlife know they are nearby. She added at this time of year, it’s also a good idea to avoid the trails during dawn and dusk as it’s a highly active period for wildlife hunting. – See http://www.660news.com/2014/05/25/grizzly-punctures-bear-spray-can-during-attack-on-biker-and-flees/

Heartland virus:

Lone Star Tick

Lone Star Tick

Oklahoma 05/27/14 newsok.com: The Oklahoma Department of Health has confirmed the state’s first case and death of Heartland virus. The Health Department says a Delaware County resident recently died from complications of the virus. Heartland virus was first identified in Missouri in 2009. The virus is found in the Lone Star tick and is likely spread through tick bites. The Oklahoma case is only the tenth person confirmed with the virus and the second person to die from it. Other cases have occurred in Missouri and Tennessee. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, loss of appetite, nausea, bruising easily and diarrhea. All of the patients diagnosed with Heartland virus reported spending several hours per day in outside activities or occupations. There is no vaccine or drug to prevent or treat the disease. – See http://newsok.com/oklahoma-heartland-virus-death-confirmed/article/4851400 and http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/heartland/index.html

Lyme Disease:

lyme-awareness5128New Hampshire 05/25/14 fosters.com: According to Alan Eaton, an entomologist with the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, New Hampshire has the highest incidence of Lyme disease in the country. Eaton said this is in part due to high tick populations, but also because so many people live close to or in wooded areas where ticks flourish. Eaton also said the highest incidence of Lyme Disease within the state is found in the Seacoast region. – See http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140525/GJNEWS_01/140529521/-1/FOSNEWS

Hantavirus:

imagesCA4WCXZVColorado 05/23/14 Costilla County: The third human case of hantavirus in the state this year was reported in Costilla County. Earlier this month a fatal case was reported in Rio Grande County. Two to six cases are reported in the state each year. – See http://www.koaa.com/news/hantavirus-reported-in-costilla-county/

Deer mouse. CDC.

Deer mouse. CDC.

Oklahoma 05/22/14 Texas County: by Kyle Fredrickson – A Panhandle man has died as a result of a virus commonly carried by wild rodents, according to the state Health Department. The man, who is only identified as being age 65 or older, was a Texas County resident. The state Health Department said he died of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, which has no cure, said Becky Coffman, an epidemiologist with the department. Hantavirus is carried by wild rodents, especially deer mice, found in Oklahoma and southwest portions of the U.S. It’s transmitted to humans by touch or inhalation of virus particles shed by its host through fecal matter, urine and saliva. Data show it is most often contracted when people in rural areas are maintaining buildings with high rodent activity. – See http://newsok.com/oklahoma-panhandle-resident-dies-as-result-of-virus-carried-by-wild-rodents/article/4846191

Rabies:

Raccoon cub.

Raccoon cub.

Ohio 05/28/14 Westchester County: Someone left five well-fed baby raccoons on the doorstep of the Westchester County, N.Y., Health Department on Friday, and the department said that person should call immediately to be assessed for the possibility of rabies. The month-old raccoons were delivered to the department’s office in Mount Kisco in a cage with bottles of milk, blankets and toys, the department said. “They appear to have been well cared for and nurtured, which means that there was direct contact between these raccoons and the person or people who were caring for them,” said Dr. Sherlita Amler, the county health commissioner. “That’s why it’s important that we talk to the individual or individuals who left them to determine if they may have been potentially exposed to rabies.” Raccoons are among the most-common carriers of rabies, a disease that is fatal if not quickly treated. Department spokeswoman Caren Halbfinger said that the raccoons’ caretaker needs to be asked about any bites or scratches. Officials also want to know whether the raccoons’ mother was sick. – See http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/national_world/2014/05/26/raccoons-0526-art-gj9sdmjt-1.html

Two COLORADO women attacked by MOOSE ~ CANADA: Two NUNAVUT hunters attacked by POLAR BEAR ~ OKLAHOMA confirms state’s first HANTAVIRUS death in 2014 ~ RABIES report from ILLINOIS.

Bull moose. Courtesy U.S. National Park Service.

Bull moose. Courtesy U.S. National Park Service.

Colorado 05/20/14 cnn.com: by Ed Payne – A couple of Colorado women were recuperating after a moose attack northwest of Denver over the weekend. They were walking their dogs in the city of Black Hawk when the encounter took place, the Gilpin County Sheriff’s Office said. “All of a sudden, I looked up and he was looking right at me and grunted and then charged,” Jackqueline Boron told CNN affiliate KDVR.. “I tried to get up, and he kept coming back and stomping on me.” “When I fell back he got me here,” Boron said, pointing to her arm. “Then, when I curled up forward, that’s when he got me on the head.” The attack left Boron with staples in the back of her head, 15 stitches on her leg and four broken ribs, KDVR reported. Ellen Marie Divis was also stomped on by the moose, but was able to get away to find help. “I heard ‘help me, help me, help me,’” neighbor Chris Hockley told KDVR. “This lady comes running up to her house and she’s covered in blood.” The sheriff’s office issued a warning after the attack. “If you encounter a moose: walk away from it — DO NOT walk towards it; moose are agitated by dogs; make sure your dog is on a leash, control the dog(s) and walk away,” the warning said. – For complete article and video see http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/20/us/colorado-moose-attack/

Polar Bear:

Canada:

Bear-standing-Cranearctic.noss.gov-1Nunavut 05/22/14 nunatsiaqonline.ca: Two hunters are being treated for injuries sustained in a May 22 polar bear attack outside the community of Arctic Bay. Police said local members of the search and rescue team were called to help the two men, who are thought to have been attacked by at least one bear at the floe edge early May 22. The RCMP said the two men were being treated at the local nursing station this morning. Sources in Arctic Bay say the men’s injuries were not serious, and both were able to walk off the sea ice. – For complete article see http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674two_nunavut_hunters_being_treated_after_polar_bear_attack/

Hantavirus:

imagesCAULAVUQOklahoma 05/22/14 Texas County: Health officials have confirmed that a man’s death is due to Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, which is carried by wild rodents. The victim was exposed after dust was stirred up while cleaning a rodent-infested area. – See http://www.sfgate.com/news/science/article/Oklahoma-confirms-hantavirus-death-in-Texas-County-5498427.php

Rabies:

1Illinois 05/20/14 daily-chronicle.com: by Andrea Azzo – Authorities are trying to identify the owners of the pit bull that bit a Sycamore woman’s arm severely enough to require surgery. Part of the urgency behind the search is to determine if she will have to undergo rabies shots. The pit bull’s owners, described as two white men and one Hispanic or Indian man in their 20s, walked away from DeKalb’s new dog park in Katz Park after another couple at the park called the police. The bite victim, Angela Rojas, said her primary focus was to get to the hospital after she was attacked. “It all happened really fast,” Rojas said. “Our goal now is to find out if the dog has his vaccinations.” . . . The dog park where this happened is owned by the DeKalb Park District and is relatively new. Katz Park, 393 W. Dresser Road in DeKalb, opened in December after a five-year lobbying effort to have a local place for dogs to run off-leash. Two signs at the park, one at the entrance, indicate dog owners are responsible for the actions of their dogs and require all dogs must wear current license tags and be up-to-date on shots. – For complete article see http://www.daily-chronicle.com/2014/05/20/dekalb-police-seek-dog-that-bit-woman/a207ony/

Military wife mauled by BROWN BEAR while jogging on base in ALASKA.

Brown bear. Photo by Marshmallow. Wikimedia Commons.

Brown bear. Photo by Marshmallow. Wikimedia Commons.

Alaska 05/19/14 postbulletin.com: by Mark Thiessen – Bloodied and dazed after being slashed by the claws of a brown bear, a woman struggled to walk 2 miles along a curvy, hilly trail to find someone to help her. The woman, who has asked that her identity not be released, was hospitalized in stable condition Monday, a day after the attack on an Anchorage military base, officials said. She suffered lacerations to her neck, arms and legs. The woman was jogging with her soldier husband Sunday morning on the northwestern part of the sprawling Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The couple became separated, and as she jogged down a hill near a bend, she came upon a bear leaving a trail at the same time. Air Force Maj. Angela Webb said they startled each other, and the bear, with two cubs in tow, assumed a defensive position in the largely wooded, remote area. “The bear attacked her, defending her babies, seeing her as a threat,” said Mark Sledge, senior conservation law enforcement officer at the base. The bear knocked down the woman and took at least one swipe at her. Officials still haven’t interviewed the woman and don’t know if she was knocked unconscious or played dead until the animal left the area. Playing dead is the appropriate response when meeting a female bear protecting cubs, Sledge said.

jber logo smallAuthorities don’t know how long she lay there after the attack. At some point, the blood-covered woman was able to start up the rough terrain for the road, about 2 miles away. “The survival instinct for that woman is phenomenal,” Sledge said. “The trauma that she went through and the walk out was heroic.” A soldier driving in the area saw the woman and rushed her to the base hospital. From there, she was transferred to the Alaska Native Medical Center. Meanwhile, her husband knew nothing of the attack. He had gotten ahead of her while jogging and went back looking for her before base security picked him up and took him to the hospital. Sledge estimated the bear to be between 7 and 8 feet tall based on the 7-inch size of the rear paw pads. He said the woman is lucky to be alive.

Brown bear.

Brown bear.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game recommended the recreation areas near the attack site be closed for a week to give the bear time to clear out. Sledge reminded people to be aware of their surroundings, because spring in Alaska can be dangerous. It’s a time when wildlife such as bears and moose will aggressively defend their young. The joint Army and Air Force base covers 75,000 acres within the municipal limits of Anchorage. Some of the base is not fenced, allowing bears and moose to travel freely between base land and forest land surrounding the Chugach Mountains. Based on past studies, officials estimated that up to 40 brown bears and up to 300 black bears migrate through the base seasonally, Sledge said.

Vets in FLOOD AREAS warn DOG owners about LEPTOSPIROSIS ~ Two new LYME DISEASE species found in FLORIDA and GEORGIA ~ COYOTE attacks MAN and DOG in COLORADO ~ RABIES reports from VIRGINIA & CANADA: ONTARIO.

Texas flood zone.

Texas flood zone.

National 05/15/14 rfdtv.com: With all the recent storms and flooding, veterinarians are warning of a disease that spreads through water to both dogs and people. “The most important thing about leptospirosis is it’s a zoonotic disease so dogs can transmit the disease to people,” explained Dr. Ken Harkin, a veterinarian with Kansas State University. Harkin is an expert on leptospirosis. He says the bacterial disease can result in kidney failure and can be deadly to dogs. Symptoms of the disease, for both humans and dogs, include joint pain, weakness, vomiting and possibly jaundice.

image_702798The disease is spread through the urine of wild and domestic animals, and dogs and their owners can be exposed from the same source. “A great example, a few years ago we had a client who brought her dog in here with leptospirosis because their front yard had flooded and the raccoons had contaminated their front yard. Both the husband and the dog ended up in the hospital, obviously different hospitals. He has leptospirosis. The dog had leptospirosis. They both got it from the front yard from the raccoons, but certainly the dog could be a potential source for leptospirosis,” said Harkin. There is a vaccine available. Harkin advises to get your dog vaccinated if you live in an area where this disease is prevalent. – See http://www.rfdtv.com/story/24589387/about-us

Lyme Disease:

Dr. Kerry Clark

Dr. Kerry Clark

National 05/14/14 news-medical.net: Dr. Kerry Clark, associate professor of public health at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, and his colleagues have found additional cases of Lyme disease in patients from several states in the southeastern U.S. These cases include two additional Lyme disease Borrelia species recently identified in patients in Florida and Georgia. Overall, 42 percent of 215 patients from southern states tested positive for some Lyme Borrelia species. More than 90 cases of Lyme infection were confirmed among patients from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia. Of these southern cases, 69 percent were found to have infection with B. burgdorferi, 22 percent with B. americana and 3 percent with B. andersonii. “For years, medical practitioners and the public have been told that Lyme disease is rare to nonexistent in the southern United States. Our earlier research demonstrated that Lyme disease bacteria were present in animals and ticks in our region,” said Clark. “The more recent evidence shows that the disease is also present in human patients in the South, and suggests that it’s common among patients presenting with signs and symptoms consistent with the clinical presentation of Lyme disease recognized in the northeastern part of the country.” His new paper, “Geographical and Genospecies Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA Detected in Humans in the USA,” was published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology in February. Dr. Brian Leydet in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at Louisiana State University and Dr. Clifford Threlkeld of Ameripath Central Florida collaborated with Clark in his latest research.

lyme-disease-in-children1The findings are significant for several reasons. They provide additional evidence that multiple Lyme Borrelia species are associated with human disease in the U.S., similar to the situation in Europe. The new findings expand the geographic area where Lyme disease should be considered by medical providers and citizens alike, and suggest that human cases of Lyme disease in the southern U.S. may be much more common than previously recognized. Prior to Clark’s previously published paper in 2013, only one or two Lyme bacterial species, Borrelia burgdorferi and B. bissettii, were recognized to cause disease in North America. Current testing methods and interpretation criteria, designed to detect just one species (B. burgdorferi), may explain many of the complaints involving the unreliability of Lyme disease tests in the U.S. Most of the patients included in Clark’s study were suffering from a variety of chronic health problems, such as fatigue, headaches, muscle and joint pain and cognitive dysfunction. As a result, Clark’s research may help millions of chronically ill people living in areas where Lyme disease wasn’t previously recognized. Called “The New Great Imitator,” Lyme disease is often mistaken for illnesses such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), Parkinson’s, ADHD and even Alzheimer’s. – For complete article see http://www.news-medical.net/news/20140514/UNF-Professor-discovers-2-Lyme-disease-bacterial-species-that-infect-human-patients.aspx

Coyote:

nm_Coyote_090722_mainColorado 05/16/14 9news.com: by Robert Garrison, KUSA – A coyote attacked a man and his dog walking on the CU-Boulder campus Thursday evening. University of Boulder police said it happened in a wooded area, southwest of Foothills Parkway and Arapahoe Avenue. The man reported that after focusing on them for some time, the coyote approached and eventually attacked his dog. The dog was on a leash and the man was able to pull the dog away from the attack. The coyote then lunged at the man, biting his left forearm as he reached out to block the coyote’s advance. The man was able to fend off the attack by kicking the coyote and swinging a stick as it retreated. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.9news.com/story/news/local/2014/05/16/coyote-attacks-man-dog-on-cu-campus/9190271/

Rabies:

help-mdVirginia 05/15/14 James City County: A cat that bit someone and a dog that scratched another person on Wednesday in two county neighborhoods are wanted by the Peninsula Health District for observation to ensure they aren’t rabid. A Siamese cat with blue eyes bit a person on Wednesday in the Black Heath area of Ford’s Colony, according to a press release. The cat has been seen in the area wearing a collar, but it was not wearing one at the time of the incident. The same day a black dog with a “pug-like” face weighing about 40 pounds scratched a person in the 3900 block of Powhatan Parkway in Powhatan Secondary, according to a separate release. The releases indicate, once found, both animals will be confined within their homes for a period of ten days. If they are not found, the victims will have to undergo post-exposure treatment for rabies prevention. Anyone who has seen an animal fitting either description is asked to call the Peninsula Health District – Williamsburg Environmental Health at 757-603-4277. After hours contact animal control at 757-253-1800.- See http://www.vagazette.com/news/va-vg-two-animals-sought-for-rabies-observation-20140515,0,1810898.story

Canada:

help-298x300Ontario 05/15/14 Grey Bruce Health Unit: by Janice MacKay – (Officials hope) to find the owner of a dog that bit a youth in Owen Sound. A young male was walking the large brown boxer type dog behind the Owen Sound Family YMCA on Tuesday at about 2:20pm, when it bit another youth. Health unit staff hope to confirm the dog is not infectious with rabies, so the victim can avoid post exposure rabies treatment. Anyone with information is asked to call 519-376-9420. – See http://blackburnnews.com/midwestern-ontario/midwestern-ontario-news/2014/05/15/owen-sound-boy-hopes-to-avoid-rabies-treatments/

FOLLOW-UP REPORT: OREGON’S celebrity WOLF known as OR-7 appears to have finally found a mate – 20 FLORIDA healthcare workers believed exposed to second imported case of MERS.

Gray wolves. Courtesy National Park Service. (Not an image of Mr & Mrs OR-7)

Gray wolves. Courtesy National Park Service. (Not an image of Mr & Mrs OR-7)

Follow-Up Report:

Oregon 05/12/14 oregonlive.com: by Lynne Terry – The wandering wolf OR-7 appears to have a mate. Remote cameras in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest have captured several images of  a black female in the same area as OR-7, who has been on the move since 2011 in search of new territory and a mate to form a new pack. The images were recovered Wednesday by John Stephenson, wolf biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as part of an ongoing wolf monitoring program by state and federal wildlife biologists. “This information is not definitive, but it is likely that this new wolf and OR-7 have paired up,” Stephenson said. He said transmissions from OR-7′s radio collar also indicate the two have denned. “If that is correct, they would be rearing pups at this time of year,” Stephenson said.

wolf1_f2USFWS (2)The two have never been in the same shot but they have passed the camera not long after each other, indicating they are aware of each other. Biologists determined that the black wolf was a female because she’s smaller than OR-7 and squats to urinate. U.S. biologists and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will wait until June or later to confirm whether there are pups. If the two have produced offspring, they would be the first wolves known to breed in the Oregon Cascades since the early 20th century. – For video, slides, and complete article see http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/05/oregon_wolf_or-7_finds_a_mate.html

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS):

Countries reporting MERS case(s). CDC.

Countries reporting MERS case(s). CDC.

Florida 05/13/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – Two Florida healthcare workers have developed flu-like symptoms after exposure to the second U.S. case of Middle East coronavirus (MERS). They, and 18 other healthcare workers at two Orlando hospitals, are being tested for the virus, which can cause serious illness and death, medical officials said at a media conference today. They were exposed to the patient in the emergency room of Dr. P. Phillips Hospital before it was clear he was at risk for MERS, officials told reporters. One of the two with symptoms has been admitted to the hospital and the other is in isolation at home. The patient himself, a 44-year-old Saudi Arabian healthcare provider visiting family in the area, has a low-grade fever and a slight cough and remains in isolation at the hospital. Fifteen of the affected workers were involved in caring for the patient himself, but the other five were exposed when the patient last week accompanied another person to Orlando Regional Medical Center for an unrelated medical procedure. Meanwhile, a World Health Organization committee on MERS is meeting in Geneva to discuss whether the recent surge in cases in the Middle East makes the virus an international public health emergency. Results of the discussion are expected tomorrow. Saudi Arabia, the center of the outbreak, has reported an additional four cases, all of them in the capital, Riyadh, as well as five deaths, four of them involving previously reported cases. The new report brings the Saudi total to 495 cases and 152 deaths since the virus was first recognized in 2012. – For complete article and links to earlier reports see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/45755?isalert=1&uun=g632000d1308R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-05-13