Tag Archives: Anaplasmosis

Study finds TICKS like to hang out at GOLF COURSES ~ COLORADAN succumb s to HANTAVIRUS ~ TICK-BORNE ANAPLASMOSIS cases nearly double in MAINE ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: Test confirms first GRAY WOLF near GRAND CANYON in 75 years ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from CALIFORNIA ~ RABIES reports from NJ, PA & VA.

Courtesy of TickEncounter Research Center, University of Rhode Island.

Courtesy of TickEncounter Research Center, University of Rhode Island.

Global 11/22/14 business-standard.com: Golf courses are prime habitats for ticks, the tiny bloodsucking creatures, says a new study. Ticks like to feed at the boundaries between the woods and open spaces – the kind of settings found in golf courses. “Golf courses are the perfect habitat for ticks. This is because people on golf courses scare away the animals that usually prey on small rodents, so these tick-harboring rodents flourish,” said Gregory Owens of the School of Health Sciences and Practice at the New York Medical College in the US.

1319561v3v1In the study, Owens and his colleagues surveyed 29 golfers at a course in New York, where Lyme disease, an infection carried by certain ticks, is native. Nearly three-quarters of the golfers said they had found a tick on themselves after golfing, and 24 percent said they had been diagnosed with Lyme disease in the past. About one third of the golfers said they did not check themselves for ticks after golfing, and 72 percent did not use insect repellent while golfing, found the study.

Deer aka Black-legged Tick stages.

Deer aka Black-legged Tick stages.

Because the study was small, more research is needed to see how common tick-prevention behavior is among golfers, Owens said. Ticks are most active between April and September, but it is important to take preventive measures year-round. The study was presented at the American Public Health Association meeting in New Orleans.- See http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/golf-courses-are-hotspots-for-ticks-114112200181_1.html

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

Colorado 11/21/14 denverpost.com: by Electa Draper – A southeastern Adams County man died of hantavirus Nov. 15, the Tri-County Health Department reported Friday. The adult male, whose name was not released, likely was infected with hantavirus while doing home plumbing repairs in a small space with rodent droppings or in a rodent-infested garage, health officials said in a news release. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is a rare condition, with an average of four cases a year in Colorado, caused by a virus carried by rodents, especially deer mice. People are exposed to hantavirus by inhaling dust that contains the feces, urine or saliva of deer mice. It is fatal to humans in almost half the cases. – For complete article see http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_26988497/adam-county-mans-death-caused-by-hantavirus-health

ANAPLASMOSIS:

ana_incid.cdcMaine 11/22/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – The number of cases of the tick borne bacterial disease, anaplasmosis, continue to climb in Maine as the state Centers for Disease Control reports 164 cases statewide as of Nov. 18. This number is up 70 from the entire 2013 when 94 cases were reported. Anaplasmosis was first recognized as a disease of humans in the United States in the mid-1990’s, but did not become a reportable disease until 1999. It is caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Anaplasmosis is most frequently reported from the upper midwestern and northeastern United States. The areas from which cases are reported correspond with the known geographic distribution of Lyme disease. The tick responsible for transmission of A. phagocytophilum in the upper Midwest and northeastern U.S. is the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Along the West Coast, the western black-legged tick (I. pacificus) may transmit the organism. These tick species also transmit the agents of Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) and babesiosis (Babesia species), and human co-infections with these organisms have occasionally been reported. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-anaplasmosis-cases-nearly-double-last-years-count-65434/

FOLLOW-UP REPORT:

GRAY WOLF:

(See “Are GRAY WOLVES returning to GRAND CANYON?” posted 11/18/14)

12A Canid, a wolf or wolf hybrid seen near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Photo taken Oct. 27, 2014. Courtesy Arizona Game and Fish Dept.Arizona 11/21/14 tucson.com: by Felicia Fonseca – A female gray wolf from the Northern Rockies traveled hundreds of miles into Northern Arizona, marking the species’ first appearance in the region in more than 70 years and the farthest journey south, wildlife officials confirmed Friday. A wolf-like animal had been spotted roaming the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and the adjacent national forest since last month. Biologists collected its scat and sent it to a University of Idaho laboratory for testing, verifying what environmentalists had suspected based on its appearance and a radio collar around its neck. “The corroboration is really good to get,” said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity. Biologists don’t know the wolf’s age or from where it traveled. The radio collar wasn’t transmitting a signal, and cold weather forced biologists to suspend efforts to capture the animal and replace the collar.

A Northern Rockies gray wolf hadn’t been seen in the Grand Canyon area since the 1940s.The Idaho lab might be able to glean more details about the wolf from its DNA, but U.S. Fish and Wildlife spokesman Jeff Humphrey said that could take several weeks or months. “We’ll let this wolf be a wolf where it’s at, and if it decides it’s going to move back north, it can do that,” he said. “Or if somebody joins her, then that’s nature taking its course.” Wolves often roam vast distances in search of food and mates. But the farther they go, the less likely they are to find a mate, said Ed Bangs, who led recovery efforts for wolves in the Northern Rockies over two decades before retiring from the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2011. “It’s looking for love,” he said. “It leaves the core population and doesn’t know the love of its life is going to be right over the next hill, so it just keeps traveling.” For complete article see http://tucson.com/ap/national/dna-confirms-wolf-traveled-hundreds-of-miles-to-grand-canyon/article_66537d48-72f8-56cd-af01-3d00b4456c85.html

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 11/19/14 CA Dept of Health: There were 19 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Fresno (1), Kern (1), Los Angeles (11), Orange (3), San Bernardino (1), Stanislaus (1), and Sutter (1). 27 WNV-related fatalities have been reported to CDPH from twelve local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Kern (1), Long Beach City (2), Los Angeles (5), Orange (7), Placer (1), Sacramento (2), San Diego (1), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (3), and Tehama (1). 752 human cases from 31 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://www.westnile.ca.gov/

RABIES:

New Jersey 11/19/14 Somerset County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a black, brown and white tabby kitten that scratched a resident in the vicinity of Emerald Place in Franklin Township tested positive for the virus. Anyone in contact with this kitten in the Emerald Place area or surrounding neighborhoods is asked to call county health officials at (908) 231-7155 as soon as possible. – See http://patch.com/new-jersey/bridgewater/rabies-exposure-reported-franklin-township-0

IMG4336e-L-001Pennsylvania 11/20/14 Dauphin County: A feral cat brought to the Steelton Community Cat program presenting neurological symptoms has tested positive for rabies. A Rabies Alert has been issued warning residents in the Steelton and Swatara Township areas of the possible presence of the virus in the local wildlife and especially the feral cat population. – See http://www.abc27.com/story/27442070/steelton-cat-tests-positive-for-rabies

Virginia 11/19/14 Chesapeake: A black and white female cat with yellow eyes that attacked three people on November 13th in the Warrington Hall community has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.bdtonline.com/news/cat-that-attacked-in-va-had-rabies/article_613eea08-6ff9-11e4-952e-4fbbcfe01033.html

CANADA: HUNTER mauled by GRIZZLY and shot by friend in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ TEXAS HEALTHCARE WORKER infected with EBOLA ~ Current EBOLA outbreak believed due to consumption of BAT meat ~ CDC predicts CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS will spread in U.S. ~ MAINE reports first ever HUMAN case of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and heavy increase in ANAPLASMOSIS cases ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, IL & SD ~ RABIES reports from AL & NJ.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

British Columbia 10/12/14 globalnews.ca: by Negar Mojtahedi – A 56-year-old man has been transported by air ambulance to Calgary’s Foothills hospital after he was mauled by a grizzly bear and shot by his friend while hunting near Fernie, British Columbia. Early Sunday morning, conservation officers and emergency crews responded to reports of grizzly bear attack in the Elk Valley. “This is a somewhat remote area and there’s no history with this bear,” said Sgt. Cam Schley, a conservation officer from Cranbrook. The victim’s hunting partner shot and killed the 400 pound male grizzly bear. In the process, he accidentally shot his friend. His injuries are the result of being mauled by the animal and from gunfire. The victim’s hunting partner was not injured by the grizzly bear.

sebcmapDavid Karn, a spokesman for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, says the victim was in stable condition when he left the area. He is currently at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and is now believed to be in critical condition. The two men were not hunting grizzly bears. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1611225/grizzly-bear-attack-in-fernie/

EBOLA VIRUS:

EBOLA-texas-us-flag-monitorTexas 10/12/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A female healthcare worker who was involved in the care of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus. The unidentified worker, who was among those monitoring themselves for possible symptoms, developed a fever Friday night and told medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Less than 90 minutes later, the worker was in an isolation unit at the hospital, having driven to the facility, according to Daniel Varga, MD, the chief clinical officer at Texas Health Resources. A close contact of the worker is also “proactively” in isolation, Varga told reporters at a media briefing in Dallas. In a subsequent briefing, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said investigators believed the worker had only the one contact during the period when she may have been infectious. Varga said the patient and her contact are being cared for in a 24-bed intensive care unit that had been cleared for use by possible Ebola patients. He said he could not discuss the other aspects of the care of the patient. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins the county’s chief executive, said blood tests at the state reference laboratory in Austin, using polymerase chain reaction methods, showed the worker has Ebola. A second test, at the CDC, has not yet confirmed the finding, he said, but “unfortunately, we’re confident it will be.” Frieden said results of the confirmatory test were expected later on Sunday. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Ebola/48054?isalert=1&uun=g632000d2324R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-10-12

Straw colored fruit  bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Straw colored fruit bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Global 10/09/14 ibtimes.co.uk: by Hannah Osborne – People in Ghana eat bats because it is a readily available source of protein as well as being a luxury food, researchers have found. Experts at the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London were looking to find out why ‘bushmeat’ is so popular in the West African country despite the risks involved. Like many infections, Ebola is likely to have arisen from human interaction with wild animals. The current outbreak, which has killed almost 4,000 people, is believed to have come from hunting and eating bats. Researchers surveyed almost 600 people across Ghana to find out why the practice is so prevalent, despite the risks involved. Hunting and eating bats can lead to infection of ‘zoonotic’ pathogens, with the creatures in particular known for hosting more viruses than any other mammal. Transmission occurs from bites, scratches, bodily fluids, tissue and excrement.

Cambridge LogoFrom surveying hunters, vendors and bat meat consumZoological_Society_of_London_(logo)ad been bitten and scratched. None reported using protective equipment, such as gloves. Four of those interviewed said people fight over bats, sometimes lying over the animal while it was still alive to stop others from taking it – often resulting in injury. Bats were prepared and cooked in a variety of ways, with the most common being to smoke them and putting them in soup. Researchers said it appears bat bushmeat is both a source of sustenance and luxury food, as many hunters said they would keep their catches for themselves. Consumers reported high taste ratings and relatively high prices, suggesting it is a sought-after product. – For complete article see http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak-why-do-people-eat-bat-meat-1469295

CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS (CHIKV):

aaCDC-LogoWestern Hemisphere 10/07/14 cdc.gov: Media Release – Since the chikv outbreak began in December 2013, nearly 750,000 cases have been reported in the Caribbean and Central, South and North America. In the United States, 1,200 travelers have imported the virus to the United States, and 11 locally transmitted cases have been reported in Florida as of September 30. The mosquitoes that can transmit chikv are common in many parts of the Americas, including the United States. CDC anticipates that the virus will continue to spread to new areas in the Americas. In the United States, CDC experts believe chikv will behave like dengue virus. Imported dengue cases have led to small, sporadic local transmission in the continental United States but have not led to widespread outbreaks. – See http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p1006-chikungunya-in-americas.html

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

EEE54fgh84Maine 10/10/14 pressherald.com: A York County resident over 60 has been identified as the state’s first human case of EEE since Maine began testing for the virus in 1964. The individual fell sick in late July and was hospitalized in August, first in Maine and later in Massachusetts, but has since returned home to recuperate.- For complete article see http://www.pressherald.com/2014/10/10/first-maine-resident-tests-positive-for-eee/

ANAPLASMOSIS:

tickPreview2Maine 10/11/14 outbreaktoday.com: According to state health officials there have been 133 cases of anaplasmosis reported in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 94 cases reported during the same time period last year. That’s an increase of 39 cases, or more than 40% with three months remaining in the year. Nationally, the number of anaplasmosis cases reported to the CDC has increased from 348 cases in 2000, to 1,761 cases in 2010. The disease is tick-borne and people get the infection when bitten by an infected deer tick, the same one involved in the transmission of Lyme disease. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-reports-dozens-more-anaplasmosis-cases-compared-to-2013-2013/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 10/08/14 CA Dept of Health: Media Release - There were 60 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Glenn (1), Kern (2), Kings (1), Los Angeles (18), Orange (15), Riverside (4), San Bernardino (2), San Joaquin (2), Santa Clara (1), Stanislaus (3), Sutter (2), Tehama (1), Tulare (1), and Yolo (5). 16 WNV-related fatalities have been reported in to CDPH from in nine local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (1), Los Angeles (2), Orange (4), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). 488 human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

3495411871-1Illinois 10/07/14 DuPage County Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a female resident of Hanover Park in her 40s is the first fatality in the county due to WNV. State officials report two previous deaths due to WNV this year. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/WNVdeath2014

SDdhSouth Dakota 09/30/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 49 human cases of WNV statewide in 25 counties. – See Page 3at https://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Sept2014.pdf

RABIES:

Alabama 10/07/14 Covington County: A coyote found about three miles 1_62_coyote_snarlsouth of Andalusia in the Carolina community has tested positive for rabies.

New Jersey 10/07/14 dailyrecord.com: by Peggy Wright – A 69-year-old bow hunter from Cliffside Park used a knife and arrow to kill a rabid coyote that jumped him Sunday at the Black River Wildlife Management Area and a day earlier bit a bicyclist on Patriot’s Path, authorities said Tuesday. . . . The Cliffside Park man, whose name was withheld, was at the rear of the Archery Range at the management area on North Road when bitten around 12:55 p.m. on Sunday. State Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said the 34-pound male coyote “jumped” the man. Cris Cooke-Gibbs, the health officer for Chester and Washington townships, said the hunter was bitten on the face. – See http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/news/local/2014/10/07/cops-rabid-coyote-bit-two-chester-township/16847079/

1000 people to be evaluated for exposure to RABIES at SOUTH CAROLINA hospital ~ MAINE newspaper reports huge increase in state’s ANAPLASMOSIS cases over a decade ~ Other RABIES reports from TX, & VA.

Big brown bat. Common in South Carolina. Bing free use license.

Big brown bat. Common in South Carolina. Bing free use license.

South Carolina 02/17/14 wistv.com: by LaDonna Beeker – Governmental agencies are asking more than 1,000 patients and employees at The Regional Medical Center to get a health assessment immediately since the hospital reported bat sightings. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control asks patients who stayed overnight in the hospital’s east wing between Jan. 1 and Feb. 16 to contact DHEC to assess their health risk for possible exposure to bats, which can sometimes transmit rabies to people. DHEC and Centers for Disease Control are currently notifying more than 800 patients and Big_brown_bat28834300 hospital staff to encourage individuals who had direct contact with a bat or who awakened to find a bat in a room to call DHEC at 1-800-868-0404 to assess their potential risk for rabies exposure and provide referrals for further medical evaluation, if needed. DHEC is working with The Regional Medical Center and the CDC to investigate reports of recent bat sightings and contact with bats. To date, the joint investigation has not identified any reports of bites from bats by The Regional Medical Center patients or employees. – For complete article see http://www.wistv.com/story/24745074/dhec

Anaplasmosis:

Deer tick, aka Blacklegged Tick.

Deer tick, aka Blacklegged Tick.

Maine 02/16/14 kjonline.com: Epidemiologists in the state are paying close attention to a steady rise in patients presenting with anaplasmosis, yet another tick-borne virus that can cause fever, chills, fatigue, a headache or muscle pain and in some cases, death, particularly if contracted by a person whose immune system has been compromised. The disease infects white blood cells and cases have increased by a factor of ten over the past decade. According to the CDC, about one in 200 people diagnosed with the disease does not survive.

ana_incid.cdcAnaplasmosis was first recognized in the U.S. in the 1990s. In  2004, the state of Maine reported one case, its first. Eight years later, in 2012, the number of cases in Maine had increased to 52. Preliminary figures for 2013 suggest that number in Maine has now risen to 94 in a single year. – For complete article, relative statistics and preventive measures see http://www.kjonline.com/news/Anaplasmosis__Maine_s_other_tick-borne_disease_.html

Other Rabies Reports:

Texas 02/17/14 Tarrant County: A skunk captured near the Oak Lake Park area of east Fort Worth in ZIP code 76103 has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/02/17/5576511/rabid-skunk-caught-88e779r0ekilled-in-east.html?rh=1

Virginia 02/17/14 Gloucester County: A raccoon that wandered into a yard on Mark Pine Road in Bena last week exposed three dogs to rabies. One of the dogs was current on its vaccination, but two of the dogs were not. – See http://www.dailypress.com/news/gloucester-county/gloucester-blog/dp-raccoon-exposes-three-bena-dogs-to-rabies-20140217,0,7324709.story

COYOTE attacks on PETS increasing in KANSAS ~ MOUNTAIN LION report from MISSOURI ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from CDC National, AL, IL, LA, & NY ~ RABIES reports from CA, CO, NJ, NC, & VA ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending November 3, 2012.

Coyote. Courtesy National Park Service.

Kansas 11/07/12 Sedgwick County: Several veterinary clinics in Wichita report rising incidents of coyote attacks on pets. Dr. Brock Lofgreen said “Over the past few weeks I just counted four in my head that I saw over the last two weeks. I know we’ve had more than that…” – See http://www.ksn.com/news/local/story/Coyotes-are-attacking-pets-in-and-around-Wichita/sHdKE4RrykKkm3Iq_Eaf4w.cspx

Mountain Lion Sightings:

Missouri 11/09/12 Reynolds and Ripley counties: State officials have confirmed trail camera photos taken recently of a mountain lion in each county. One was taken in Reynolds County’s Current River Conservation Area south of Ellington, the other in northeast Ripley County. – See http://www.waynecojournalbanner.com/reynolds_county/news/article_3b8f1e16-2a93-11e2-aa43-0019bb30f31a.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

National 11/06/12 cdc.gov: Update – As of November 6, 2012, 48 states have reported WNV infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. A total of 5,054 cases of WNV disease in people, including 228 deaths, have been reported to CDC. Of these, 2,559 (51%) were classified as neuroinvasive disease (such as meningitis or encephalitis) and 2,495 (49%) were classified as non-neuroinvasive disease. The 5,054 cases reported thus far in 2012 is the highest number of WNV disease cases reported to CDC through the first week in November since 2003. Almost 80 percent of the cases have been reported from 12 states (Texas, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Illinois, South Dakota, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colorado, Ohio, and Arizona) and over a third of all cases have been reported from Texas. – For further details see http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm

Alabama 11/06/12 usgs.gov: Update – State health officials have confirmed 43 human cases of WNV throughout the state this year, including one death. – For a breakdown of cases by county see http://diseasemaps.usgs.gov/wnv_al_human.html

Illinois 11/08/12 Kane County: Health officials confirm an Aurora man, 64, has been identified as the 12th human case of WNV in the county this year. State officials report 245 human cases statewide, including 10 deaths. – See http://couriernews.suntimes.com/news/16248952-418/another-west-nile-case-brings-kane-county-total-to-12-in-2012.html

Louisiana 11/05/12 dhh.louisiana.gov: Update – State health officials today confirmed six new WNV human cases, urging Louisiana residents to continue to Fight the Bite. No deaths from the disease occurred this week. So far, there have been 344 human cases and 13 deaths from the disease reported this year. There are two new neuroinvasive disease cases reported this week, from East Baton Rouge and Livingston parishes. There are four new West Nile Fever cases, from Calcasieu (1), East Baton Rouge (2) and West Baton Rouge (1) parishes. – See http://new.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/2686

New York 11/08/12 Suffolk County: Health officials confirm the county’s 5th human case of WNV this year in a Babylon resident under the age of 55 who was hospitalized but has since recovered. This brings to 19 the total number of WNV human cases confirmed on Long Island this year, including one elderly resident who died. – See http://www.newsday.com/long-island/nassau/suffolk-reports-fifth-case-of-west-nile-1.4202655

Rabies:

California 11/08/12 Los Angeles County: Officials report that two more bats found in the Santa Clara Valley in the past few weeks have tested positive for rabies. This brings the total number of rabies cases in the county to 55 this year, which is a record number since testing began in 1961. – See http://scvnews.com/2012/11/08/two-more-rabid-bats-in-scv-last-for-2012/

Colorado 11/08/12 Larimer County: A skunk trapped in the vicinity of the Residence Inn near the Outlet Mall in Loveland  has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.noco5.com/story/20047511/skunk-found-in-loveland-tests-positive-for-rabies

New Jersey 11/08/12 Burlington County: A raccoon found in the vicinity of Kanabe Drive in Westampton Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://sj.sunne.ws/2012/11/08/rabies-case-found-in-area/

North Carolina 11/08/12 Brunswick County: A fox that ran from the woods on Oak Island Wednesday and bit a Mercer Street resident who was collecting her mail has tested positive for rabies. – See http://stateportpilot.com/news/article_70ee9c76-29e4-11e2-af93-0019bb2963f4.html

Virginia 11/08/12 Pittsylvania County: Health officials have issued a rabies alert after a skunk found recently in the Deerview Road area of Gretna tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.wdbj7.com/news/wdbj7-skunk-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-gretna-20121108,0,534621.story

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending November 3, 2012:

Published November 9, 2012/ 61(44); ND-607-ND-620

Anaplasmosis . . . 2 . . . New York (2),

Babesiosis . . . 9 . . . Maine, New York (8),

Giardiasis . . . 100 . . . Alabama (2), Alaska (2), Arizona, Arkansas (5), California (10), Florida (20), Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Maryland (3), Michigan (5), Missouri, New York (24), Ohio (8), Pennsylvania (2), Vermont (4), Virginia (2), Washington (6), West Virginia, Wisconsin,

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 1 . . . Maryland,

Lyme Disease . . .  100. . .  Alabama, Florida (2), Maine, Maryland (6), New York (61), Ohio, Pennsylvania (17), Tennessee, Vermont (2), Virginia (8),

Rabies (Animal) . . . 17. . . Idaho (2), New York (5), Vermont, Virginia (9),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 15 . . . Alabama, Florida, Maryland, North Carolina (8), Virginia (4),

Tularemia . . . 2 . . . Indiana, Oklahoma.

FLORIDA confirms second case of DENGUE FEVER ~ RABIES reports from ARKANSAS, & IOWA ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending October 27, 2012.

Florida 11/03/12 examiner.com: by Jim Ford – A second confirmed case of dengue fever was diagnosed in Florida on Friday and health officials are investigating a possible third case.

Seminole County

The first confirmed case was reported earlier this week in Seminole County, while the latest case is in Osceola County. It appears that dengue is now widespread in the local environment. Dengue is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. The mosquito becomes infected with dengue virus when it bites a person who has dengue virus in their blood. The person may have no symptoms and may not even be aware they are infected. After about a week, the mosquito can then transmit the virus while biting a healthy person.

Osceola County

There is no prevention other than trying to avoid mosquito bites. Though some people may experience little to no effects, the most common symptoms of dengue include high fever (over 101 degrees Fahrenheit), severe headache, severe pain behind the eyes, muscle, joint and bone pain, rash, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a more severe form of dengue infection. It can be fatal if unrecognized and not properly treated in a timely manner. DHF is caused by infection with the same viruses that cause dengue fever. With good medical management, mortality due to DHF can be less than 1%. – For complete article see http://www.examiner.com/article/dengue-fever-strikes-again-florida

Rabies:

Arkansas 10/20/12 katv.com:  The number of animals that have tested positive for rabies in the state is up to 141 animals. Last year there were 60 rabid animal cases. According to the Arkansas Department of Health, so far this year there have been 115 skunks, 21 bats, two cows and three dogs that tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.katv.com/story/19871433/rabies-cases-up-in-arkansas

Iowa 11/03/12 Polk & Dallas counties: A black cat with a pink collar reportedly bit two people on Beggars’ Night in the downtown Urbandale area, and police say they want help finding it. The incidents occurred on 69th Street north of Douglas Parkway on Tuesday. The bites were serious, said Urbandale Police Sgt. Gary Lang. The victims have started rabies shots. It creates a big problem to have cats wandering around the neighborhood, Lang said. “Cats need to be confined just like dogs,” he said. “We just need to find the owner and see if it’s had its shots.” People have been asked to call 222-3321 if they see the suspected cat.

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending October 27, 2012:

Published November 2, 2012/ 61(43); ND-593-ND-606

Anaplasmosis . . . 6 . . . New York (6),

Babesiosis . . . 5 . . . New York (5),

Ehrlichiosis . . . 4 . . . Florida, New York, North Carolina, Virginia,

Giardiasis . . . 185 . . . Alabama, Alaska (2), Arizona, Arkansas (2), California (28), Florida (25), Georgia (26), Idaho (4), Iowa (4), Maine, Maryland (2), Missouri (9), New York (33), Ohio (11), Oregon (5), Utah, Virginia (2), Washington (26), Wisconsin (2),

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 1 . . . Indiana,

Hansen Disease (Leprosy) . . . 1 . . . North Carolina, 

Lyme Disease . . .  95. . .  Florida (3), Maine (2), Maryland (5), New York (74), North Carolina (4), Ohio, Tennessee, Vermont (2), Virginia (3),

Rabies (Animal) . . . 67. . . Alabama (2), Arkansas (35), Illinois, Kansas, Maine (3), New York (4), Oklahoma (12), Oregon (2), Texas (7),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 25 . . . Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina (16), Oklahoma (3), Tennessee (3), Texas.

MINNESOTA YOUNGSTER attacked by possibly RABID RACCOON ~ FLORIDA WOMAN hospitalized after being attacked by COYOTE ~ Two MOUNTAIN LIONS concern CALIFORNIA officials ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from CDC NATIONAL, CAx2, FL, MS, & TX ~ RABIES reports from AR, FL, IL, & ME ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending October 20, 2012.

Photo by Svdmolen. Wikimedia Commons.

Minnesota 10/25/12 Mower County: A raccoon that attacked and bit a 3-year-old girl near Austin will be tested for rabies. The girl’s father killed the raccoon after her mother saw it biting her daughter’s arm and kicked it away. – See http://www.startribune.com/local/175810081.html

Florida 10/25/12 Brevard County: A Malabar woman was hospitalized on Wednesday after being attacked by a coyote in the 500 block of Hall Road.  The woman’s daughter-in-law shot the animal. – See http://www.clickorlando.com/news/Malabar-woman-hospitalized-after-coyote-attack/-/1637132/17135712/-/b0aa1z/-/index.html

Mountain Lion Sightings:

California 10/24/12 Contra Costa County: A woman walking with her child in a stroller on a trail in the vicinity of Lake Drive in Kensington on Friday spotted a mountain lion about 2,000 feet north of the Berkeley border and about the same distance east of the Little Farm in Tilden Park. – See http://berkeley.patch.com/articles/mountain-lion-encounter-reported-by-mother-with-child-in-stroller

California 10/24/12 Los Angeles County: Hikers in Malibu’s Point Mugu State Park found a dead mountain lion a short distance from one of the trails. State wildlife officials are investigating. – See http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/10/mountain-lion-found-dead-in-point-mugu-state-park.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

National 10/23/12 cdc.gov: Update – 48 states have reported WNV infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. A total of 4,725 cases of WNV disease in people, including 219 deaths, have been reported to CDC. Of these, 2,413 (51%) were classified as neuroinvasive disease (such as meningitis or encephalitis) and 2,312 (49%) were classified as non-neuroinvasive disease. The 4,725 cases reported thus far in 2012 is the highest number of WNV disease cases reported to CDC through the fourth week in October since 2003. Almost 70 percent of the cases have been reported from eight states (Texas, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Illinois, South Dakota, Michigan, and Oklahoma) and over a third of all cases have been reported from Texas. – For further details see http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm

California 10/23/12 San Bernardino County: A man in his 70s from Rancho Cucamonga is the first WNV-related fatality in the county this year. – See http://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com/sanbernardinocounty/ci_21838181/rancho-cucamonga-resident-dies-from-west-nile-virus

California 10/24/12 San Mateo County: Health officials today confirmed a squirrel in San Mateo tested positive for WNV. The squirrel tested positive for WNV chronic, which officials say indicates a low infection level, meaning the infection was not acquired this year and is a lesser concern to public health officials. – See http://sanmateo.patch.com/articles/san-mateo-squirrel-tests-positive-wnv

Florida 10/23/12 Duval County: A 39-year-old woman is the 26th human case of WNV in the county this year. – http://jacksonville.com/news/metro/2012-10-23/story/jacksonville-journal-26th-west-nile-case-reported-duval

Mississippi 10/24/12 bolivacom.com: The state’s health department has confirmed 8 new human cases of WNV in the past week occurring in seven counties, including 1 case in Sunflower County. Two positive cases had earlier been reported in Bolivar County. There have been 233 human cases statewide this year, including 5 deaths. – See http://www.bolivarcom.com/view/full_story/20587777/article-WNV-hits-new-county?instance=latest_articles

Texas 10/24/12 Jim Wells County: A 14-month-old baby in the city of Alice is the first confirmed human case of WNV in the county. – See http://www.kristv.com/news/baby-diagnosed-with-west-nile-virus/

Rabies:

Arkansas 10/25/12 Fulton County: A dead skunk found in a resident’s backyard near a fenced area where unvaccinated dogs are kept has tested positive for rabies. So far this year officials have confirmed 115 cases of rabies statewide including 90 skunks. – See http://www.areawidenews.com/story/1906835.html

Florida 10/25/12 Brevard County: Officials say a bat found in Melbourne on Tuesday has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.sfgate.com/news/science/article/Bat-in-Melbourne-tested-positive-for-rabies-3981526.php

Illinois 10/25/12 Will County: A bat trapped beneath a light pole outside a residence in Elwood is the 12th positive rabies case in the county this year, which marks a new record. Previously, the 11 cases confirmed in 2007 held the record. – See http://bolingbrook.patch.com/articles/will-county-sets-record-for-rabid-bats-in-one-year-c30373c1

Maine 10/26/12 Cumberland County: A Falmouth woman is trying to identify a dog so she can spare her 5-year-old daughter a series of rabies shots. Gia Davis said her daughter was walking with a care-giver on one of Portland’s trails near the Ocean Avenue dog park about 4:45 p.m. Tuesday when a dog attacked her. The care-giver and witnesses told Davis that the girl, who was already afraid of dogs, curled up in a fetal position and the dog bit her in the back of the neck and broke the skin, Davis said. The dog retreated after a woman called for it. “We were probably pretty lucky,” Davis said. “This dog had her by the back of the neck.”

Now, Davis wants to make sure the dog has had a rabies shot, so that her daughter doesn’t have to get a series of five shots, including two at the site of the puncture. “I have to vaccinate her. It’s most likely not needed, but I don’t know 100 percent and I have to make a pretty quick call,” Davis said. She must hear by Friday night or she will have to start the treatment, she said. The care-giver, who is a nurse, tried to get the name of the dog’s owner, Davis said. The woman said her name was Regina and she was from Vermont. She gave her a phone number with a Vermont area code. When they tried to call the number later, it was disconnected. Davis said the number may have been copied wrong, but either way, she wants to know whether the dog is up to date on its vaccinations. Dogs must be licensed in Maine and must have up-to-date rabies vaccinations to be licensed. Davis said she has few clues about the dog’s identity. It appeared to be a mixed breed related to a pit bull though somewhat bigger, like a Labrador retriever, she said.

The woman was with a man, and they appeared to be in their 30s. He had a short, scruffy beard and she had shoulder- length, straight dark hair and was wearing a green L.L. Bean-style vest, the care-giver told Davis. They appeared to be with another couple, who had two yellow Labrador retrievers, Davis said. Anyone with information is asked to call Lt. John Kilbride at the Falmouth Police Department.

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending October 20, 2012:

Published October 26, 2012/ 61(42); ND-579-ND-592

Anaplasmosis . . . 7 . . . Missouri, New York (6),

Babesiosis . . . 8 . . . New York (8),

Brucellosis . . . 2 . . . Florida, Tennessee,    

Ehrlichiosis . . . 12 . . . Florida, Missouri, New York, North Carolina (8), Virginia,

Giardiasis . . . 171 . . . Alabama (3), Arizona (2), Arkansas (3), California (20), Florida (35), Idaho (2), Iowa (4), Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts (3), Michigan (3), Nevada, New York (34), Ohio (23), Oregon (6), Pennsylvania (11), Vermont (2), Washington (15), Wisconsin (2),

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 2 . . . Maryland, New York,

Hansen Disease (Leprosy) . . . 1 . . . Kansas, 

Lyme Disease . . .  119. . .  Connecticut, Delaware, Florida (5), Maine (2), Maryland (8), Massachusetts (2), New York (54), North Carolina (5), Pennsylvania (29), Virginia (12),

Rabies (Animal) . . . 42. . . Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York (12), Rhode Island (2), Texas (8), Vermont (5), Virginia (12), West Virginia,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 1. . . Indiana,  

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 10 . . . Indiana, Missouri, North Carolina (4), Pennsylvania, Tennessee (3),

Tularemia . . . 8 . . . Oklahoma (8).

EQUINE WEST NILE VIRUS cases now at 518 nationally ~ COYOTE report from ILLINOIS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from GA, IL, OK, & SC ~ RABIES report from GEORGIA ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending October 13, 2012.

Feral horse and foal. Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, Montana. Courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

National 10/18/12 dvm360.com: by Heather Biele, DVM – In early September, 187 cases of equine West Nile virus were reported nationwide, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s disease maps. Now, just one month later, that number has soared to 518, according to a report posted on October 16. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) released a similar report in early October showing that the mosquito-borne virus is a much greater problem this year, having far surpassed 2011’s report of 87 cases. The USDA states, however, that while this number is higher than the number of cases identified last year, it’s very similar to the number of cases reported to officials years prior.

Amy Glaser, DVM, PhD, a West Nile virus expert and senior research associate at the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, isn’t surprised by these numbers and actually expects a peak in caseload around this time each year. “Traditionally, the largest volume for equine West Nile virus occurs in September and October, right up until the first frost,” she says. “That typically represents the peak of cases we see during any particular epizootic year.”

At this time, only seven states remain free of the virus—Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, New Hampshire and West Virginia (Alaska and Hawaii have never reported West Nile virus). As of October 16, Texas holds the highest number of cases with 83, and Louisiana and Pennsylvania are close behind with 50 and 46, respectively. – For complete article see http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+Equine/Equine-West-Nile-virus-cases-almost-triple-in-past/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/793412?contextCategoryId=378

Coyote Attacks:

Illinois 10/19/12 Cook and Lake counties: A pair of coyotes attacked a dog on Thursday being walked by its owner in Buffalo Grove’s Mike Rylko Community Park. A park representative said signs have been posted advising people to remain on trails and to keep their dogs leashed. – See http://buffalogrove.patch.com/articles/park-district-warns-of-coyotes-near-buffalo-grove-park

West Nile Virus (WNV):

Georgia 10/18/12 Houston County: Family members have confirmed that 65-year-old Charles Hendrix of Warner Robins has died of WNV after a long battle with the virus. – See http://www.41nbc.com/news/local-news/15764-houston-county-man-infected-with-west-nile-virus-dies

Illinois 10/18/12 idph.state.il.us: Update – State health officials have confirmed 211 human cases of WNV in the state so far this year, including 9 fatalities. For additional statistics see http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/wnvglance12.htm

Oklahoma 10/18/12 Pontotoc County: Health officials confirmed today that a county man older than 65 is the 12th person to die from WNV in the state this year. – http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=17&articleid=20121018_17_0_OKLAHO422102

South Carolina 10/17/12 greenvilleonline.com: State health officials have confirmed the number of WNV-related fatalities in the state so far this year now totals three, and there have been a total of 40 human cases of the virus reported this year, which is about 700% above the typical figure of 3 to 5 cases per year. – See http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20121017/NEWS/310170071/Three-dead-state-from-West-Nile-virus?odyssey=nav|head

Rabies:

Georgia 10/18/12 Forsyth County: A fox suspected of having rabies attacked a man and bit two dogs, authorities reported Thursday. Local officers are warning residents to be on the lookout for the fox in and near the Hampton subdivision, located off GA 400 as it remains on the loose. – See http://cumming.patch.com/articles/possibly-rabid-fox-attacks-man-dogs-in-north-forsyth

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending October 13, 2012:

Published October 19, 2012/ 61(41); ND-565-ND-578

Anaplasmosis . . . 10 . . . New York (9), North Carolina,

Babesiosis . . . 4 . . . New York (4),

Giardiasis . . . 127 . . . Alabama (3), Alaska (2), Arizona, Arkansas (4), California (27), Delaware, Florida (22), Iowa (2), Maryland (3), Michigan (2), Missouri (2), New York (17), Ohio (9), Oregon, Pennsylvania (5), Vermont (4), Virginia (3), Washington (15), Wisconsin (2), Wyoming,

Hansen Disease (Leprosy) . . . 1 . . . California, 

Lyme Disease . . .  75. . .  Florida (2), Maine (2), Maryland (6), New Hampshire, New York (37), North Carolina (3), Ohio, Pennsylvania (21), Virginia, Wyoming,

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 1 . . . Michigan,  

Rabies (Animal) . . . 56. . . Kansas (2), Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri (2), Nevada (2), New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York (4), Ohio, Oklahoma (7), Texas (26), Vermont, Virginia (7),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 1. . . North Carolina,  

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 15 . . . Arkansas (2), North Carolina (8), Tennessee (3), Virginia (2).