Tag Archives: bat

CANADA: HUNTER mauled by GRIZZLY and shot by friend in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ TEXAS HEALTHCARE WORKER infected with EBOLA ~ Current EBOLA outbreak believed due to consumption of BAT meat ~ CDC predicts CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS will spread in U.S. ~ MAINE reports first ever HUMAN case of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and heavy increase in ANAPLASMOSIS cases ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, IL & SD ~ RABIES reports from AL & NJ.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

British Columbia 10/12/14 globalnews.ca: by Negar Mojtahedi – A 56-year-old man has been transported by air ambulance to Calgary’s Foothills hospital after he was mauled by a grizzly bear and shot by his friend while hunting near Fernie, British Columbia. Early Sunday morning, conservation officers and emergency crews responded to reports of grizzly bear attack in the Elk Valley. “This is a somewhat remote area and there’s no history with this bear,” said Sgt. Cam Schley, a conservation officer from Cranbrook. The victim’s hunting partner shot and killed the 400 pound male grizzly bear. In the process, he accidentally shot his friend. His injuries are the result of being mauled by the animal and from gunfire. The victim’s hunting partner was not injured by the grizzly bear.

sebcmapDavid Karn, a spokesman for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, says the victim was in stable condition when he left the area. He is currently at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and is now believed to be in critical condition. The two men were not hunting grizzly bears. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1611225/grizzly-bear-attack-in-fernie/

EBOLA VIRUS:

EBOLA-texas-us-flag-monitorTexas 10/12/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A female healthcare worker who was involved in the care of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus. The unidentified worker, who was among those monitoring themselves for possible symptoms, developed a fever Friday night and told medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Less than 90 minutes later, the worker was in an isolation unit at the hospital, having driven to the facility, according to Daniel Varga, MD, the chief clinical officer at Texas Health Resources. A close contact of the worker is also “proactively” in isolation, Varga told reporters at a media briefing in Dallas. In a subsequent briefing, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said investigators believed the worker had only the one contact during the period when she may have been infectious. Varga said the patient and her contact are being cared for in a 24-bed intensive care unit that had been cleared for use by possible Ebola patients. He said he could not discuss the other aspects of the care of the patient. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins the county’s chief executive, said blood tests at the state reference laboratory in Austin, using polymerase chain reaction methods, showed the worker has Ebola. A second test, at the CDC, has not yet confirmed the finding, he said, but “unfortunately, we’re confident it will be.” Frieden said results of the confirmatory test were expected later on Sunday. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Ebola/48054?isalert=1&uun=g632000d2324R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-10-12

Straw colored fruit  bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Straw colored fruit bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Global 10/09/14 ibtimes.co.uk: by Hannah Osborne – People in Ghana eat bats because it is a readily available source of protein as well as being a luxury food, researchers have found. Experts at the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London were looking to find out why ‘bushmeat’ is so popular in the West African country despite the risks involved. Like many infections, Ebola is likely to have arisen from human interaction with wild animals. The current outbreak, which has killed almost 4,000 people, is believed to have come from hunting and eating bats. Researchers surveyed almost 600 people across Ghana to find out why the practice is so prevalent, despite the risks involved. Hunting and eating bats can lead to infection of ‘zoonotic’ pathogens, with the creatures in particular known for hosting more viruses than any other mammal. Transmission occurs from bites, scratches, bodily fluids, tissue and excrement.

Cambridge LogoFrom surveying hunters, vendors and bat meat consumZoological_Society_of_London_(logo)ad been bitten and scratched. None reported using protective equipment, such as gloves. Four of those interviewed said people fight over bats, sometimes lying over the animal while it was still alive to stop others from taking it – often resulting in injury. Bats were prepared and cooked in a variety of ways, with the most common being to smoke them and putting them in soup. Researchers said it appears bat bushmeat is both a source of sustenance and luxury food, as many hunters said they would keep their catches for themselves. Consumers reported high taste ratings and relatively high prices, suggesting it is a sought-after product. – For complete article see http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak-why-do-people-eat-bat-meat-1469295

CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS (CHIKV):

aaCDC-LogoWestern Hemisphere 10/07/14 cdc.gov: Media Release – Since the chikv outbreak began in December 2013, nearly 750,000 cases have been reported in the Caribbean and Central, South and North America. In the United States, 1,200 travelers have imported the virus to the United States, and 11 locally transmitted cases have been reported in Florida as of September 30. The mosquitoes that can transmit chikv are common in many parts of the Americas, including the United States. CDC anticipates that the virus will continue to spread to new areas in the Americas. In the United States, CDC experts believe chikv will behave like dengue virus. Imported dengue cases have led to small, sporadic local transmission in the continental United States but have not led to widespread outbreaks. – See http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p1006-chikungunya-in-americas.html

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

EEE54fgh84Maine 10/10/14 pressherald.com: A York County resident over 60 has been identified as the state’s first human case of EEE since Maine began testing for the virus in 1964. The individual fell sick in late July and was hospitalized in August, first in Maine and later in Massachusetts, but has since returned home to recuperate.- For complete article see http://www.pressherald.com/2014/10/10/first-maine-resident-tests-positive-for-eee/

ANAPLASMOSIS:

tickPreview2Maine 10/11/14 outbreaktoday.com: According to state health officials there have been 133 cases of anaplasmosis reported in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 94 cases reported during the same time period last year. That’s an increase of 39 cases, or more than 40% with three months remaining in the year. Nationally, the number of anaplasmosis cases reported to the CDC has increased from 348 cases in 2000, to 1,761 cases in 2010. The disease is tick-borne and people get the infection when bitten by an infected deer tick, the same one involved in the transmission of Lyme disease. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-reports-dozens-more-anaplasmosis-cases-compared-to-2013-2013/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 10/08/14 CA Dept of Health: Media Release - There were 60 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Glenn (1), Kern (2), Kings (1), Los Angeles (18), Orange (15), Riverside (4), San Bernardino (2), San Joaquin (2), Santa Clara (1), Stanislaus (3), Sutter (2), Tehama (1), Tulare (1), and Yolo (5). 16 WNV-related fatalities have been reported in to CDPH from in nine local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (1), Los Angeles (2), Orange (4), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). 488 human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

3495411871-1Illinois 10/07/14 DuPage County Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a female resident of Hanover Park in her 40s is the first fatality in the county due to WNV. State officials report two previous deaths due to WNV this year. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/WNVdeath2014

SDdhSouth Dakota 09/30/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 49 human cases of WNV statewide in 25 counties. – See Page 3at https://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Sept2014.pdf

RABIES:

Alabama 10/07/14 Covington County: A coyote found about three miles 1_62_coyote_snarlsouth of Andalusia in the Carolina community has tested positive for rabies.

New Jersey 10/07/14 dailyrecord.com: by Peggy Wright – A 69-year-old bow hunter from Cliffside Park used a knife and arrow to kill a rabid coyote that jumped him Sunday at the Black River Wildlife Management Area and a day earlier bit a bicyclist on Patriot’s Path, authorities said Tuesday. . . . The Cliffside Park man, whose name was withheld, was at the rear of the Archery Range at the management area on North Road when bitten around 12:55 p.m. on Sunday. State Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said the 34-pound male coyote “jumped” the man. Cris Cooke-Gibbs, the health officer for Chester and Washington townships, said the hunter was bitten on the face. – See http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/news/local/2014/10/07/cops-rabid-coyote-bit-two-chester-township/16847079/

CONNECTICUT woman attacked by RABID BOBCAT ~ FLORIDA confirms 3 new locally-acquired cases of DENGUE FEVER ~ FLORIDA confirms 7th locally-acquired case of CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from LA & NJ ~ RABIES reports from CO & FL.

Bobcat. Courtesy WI Dept of Natural Resources.

Bobcat. Courtesy WI Dept of Natural Resources.

Connecticut 09/01/14 foxct.com: by Samantha Schoenfeld – A woman was attacked by a bobcat in Bozrah on Saturday, Aug. 30, according to Cindy Chanaca, a spokeswoman from the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. She was attacked in her backyard on Stanton Hill Road, and was then taken to Backus Hospital in Norwich for treatment, but there’s no word on the extent of her injuries. DEEP did not find a bobcat in Bozrah, but on Sunday the department’s Environmental Conservation Police responded to reports of a bobcat sighting in Lebanon on Sunday. The calls came from the area of Norwich Avenue and Waterman Road. ENCON euthanized the bobcat. ENCON believes it is the same one that attacked the woman because of the close proximity to Stanton Road and because the bobcat had injuries consistent with the attack on the woman.

index 09/02/14: The bobcat tested positive for rabies. DEEP Environmental Conservation Police and wildlife experts released the following information about bobcats: Bobcats are common in Connecticut and found in most towns throughout the state. They are secretive, solitary and seldom observed, tending to hunt and travel in areas of thick cover.   Compared to many wildlife species, bobcats rarely cause conflicts with human activities and rarely contract rabies.  For more information visit:  www.ct.gov/deep/bobatfacts

For photos and original article see http://foxct.com/2014/09/01/bobcat-attacks-woman-in-bozrah/

 

Dengue Fever:

Florida 08/29/14 FL Health Miami-Dade County: Media Release – Officials are urging residents to take precautions against mosquito-borne illness following the investigation of three additional locally-acquired cases of dengue fever. Dengue-Fever_10459The three cases include a 49-year-old and two 64-year-old individuals. This brings the total of locally-acquired dengue cases for 2014 in Miami-Dade County to four. – See http://www.dadehealth.org/public/PUBLICnewsarticle.asp?newsID=2226&typeID=&news_type=Press+Releases

Chikungunya Fever:

Florida 08/29/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: State officials have confirmed a seventh locally-acquired case of chikungunya fever in the state, and the second case in St. Lucie County. The person was hospitalized but is recovering. In addition to the two autochthonous cases in St. Lucie County, one autochthonous case was reported in a Miami-Dade resident in June, and four autochthonous cases have been confirmed in Palm Beach County. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/st-lucie-county-confirms-2nd-local-chikungunya-case-floridas-7th-local-transmission-27521/

 

West Nile Virus (WNV):

LA-DHHLouisiana 08/29/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed nine new human cases of WNV, of which five were neuro-invasive disease cases, bringing this year’s total to 61 reported infections. Louisiana continues to have the nation’s second highest number of WNV neuro-invasive disease cases. This week’s new infections include five neuro-invasive disease cases, all in East Baton Rouge Parish. There were four new cases of West Nile fever; Ascension (1), Caddo (1) and East Baton Rouge (2) parishes. – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3100

NJDOH-LogoNew Jersey 08/22/14 NJ Dept of Health: Mosquito-borne virus Update – So far this year officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV in the state in the following counties: Gloucester and Monmouth. – See http://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/westnile/documents/results_aug22_14.pdf

 

Rabies:

jimwhitejrasaboyholdingbatHelpCardColorado 09/01/14 Pueblo County: Health officials in Pueblo County are urgently asking for the public’s help in identifying children who played with a rabid bat over the weekend. According to the Pueblo City-County Health Department, the children were playing with the bat between Wednesday and Sunday at the Sangre de Cristo Housing Apartments. Officials said contacting the children is “critical” and that they need to identify the kids “immediately.” – See http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_26447892/pueblo-health-officials-urgently-seek-kids-who-played

3610192083_22eaf9db7aFlorida 09/01/14 Suwannee County: Health officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a cat tested positive for the virus. The alert covers an area in the county that is south of Highway 90 and West 185th Road. – See http://www.wtxl.com/news/rabies-alert-issued-in-suwannee-county/article_df716a44-3224-11e4-8467-0017a43b2370.html

OTTER attacks young girl swimming in WISCONSIN lake ~ ALASKAN woman survives BROWN BEAR attack ~ COLORADAN may have contracted TULAREMIA while mowing lawn ~ New VACCINE for CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS shows promise ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, ID, LA & MS ~ Notable RABIES reports from FL, PA & TX.

Otter. Photo by Peter Trimming. Wikimedia Commons.

Otter. Photo by Peter Trimming. Wikimedia Commons.

Wisconsin 08/13/14 twincities.com: by Andy Rathbun – It was a fun time at the lake — until the otter arrived. After spending about an hour swimming with friends in Bone Lake near Luck, Wis., on Saturday, Rory Kliewer began to climb a ladder onto a dock when she suddenly felt something bite her backside and thigh. “I thought it was a northern pike,” the 12-year-old Minneapolis girl said Wednesday. “I thought a fish was after me.” As she threw the creature off of her, she realized that the animal was an otter — later estimated at 3 1/2 feet long and about 40 pounds. “It was a big, nasty one,” said Rory, who had been staying at a friend’s family cabin over the weekend. The otter then bit Rory’s head and pulled itself onto her, scratching her face.

1407973737000-Otter2Rory managed to climb the ladder onto the dock and then throw the otter off her once again, screaming throughout the incident, she said. But the otter didn’t stop there. It jumped onto the dock, and Rory ran onto land with the otter in pursuit, she said. A dog and her friend’s mother tried to scare the animal away, but it rose up on its hind legs and hissed. The otter didn’t retreat until Pat Hinschberger, the cabin’s owner and Rory’s friend’s father, rushed to the scene and yelled at the animal. “As far as I’m concerned, this thing was literally trying to kill this kid,” Hinschberger said. He added that the incident lasted no more than a minute, but it felt like much longer. Rory was taken to a local emergency room, where doctors told her it was their first time treating a victim of an otter attack, she said. Speaking from her home Wednesday, Rory was still recovering from bite wounds, scratches and bruises, and possibly the most significant injury: the trauma of the experience, which she called “really frightening.” – For video, photo and complete article see http://www.twincities.com/localnews/ci_26331000/wisconsin-otter-attacks-swimming-girl

Bear Attack:

American Brown BearAlaska 08/13/14 adn.com: by Laurel Andrews – Thea Thomas tried to step off the trail as a brown bear sprinted toward her, chasing a friend’s dog that she had brought along for a hike in Cordova on Tuesday afternoon. Yet in an instant, Thomas was flat on the ground, face-to-face with an angry bear that bit her repeatedly during the mauling on Heney Ridge Trail. . . . Thomas, a 57-year-old commercial fisherman, has lived in the Southcentral Alaska community of Cordova for 32 years, she said. “I hike those trails all the time.” Heney Ridge Trail is a 4.1-mile trail that follows Hartney Bay before climbing up through spruce-hemlock forest, salmon-spawning streams and a mile of steep incline up above the treeline, according to the U.S. Forest Service website. . . . She described the brown bear as 6-7 feet tall on its hind legs, with a thick auburn-orange coat. The bear appeared to be in good health. “I kept thinking he was going to stop,” Thomas said. But the attack continued. The bear walked away a couple of times, but would then turn back and bite her again, she said. At one point she tried to get up, but it pulled her back, she said. . . . She was medevaced to an Anchorage hospital on Tuesday. “I’ve got a feeling I’m going to be here a while,” she said. The bear bit her around seven times, she said. The worst bites were to her back and inner thigh. – For complete article see http://www.adn.com/article/20140813/woman-mauled-brown-bear-cordova-hiking-trail-describes-attack

Tularemia:

Media.aspxColorado 08/12/14 9news.com: A Larimer County man hospitalized for tularemia may have been exposed to the disease while mowing a property outside of Windsor. He was treated with two courses of antibiotics that offered no improvement, but he was released after several days and is expected to make a full recovery. – See http://www.9news.com/story/news/health/2014/08/12/tularemia-fort-collins-weld-larimer-county/13964835/

Chikungunya Virus:

Canine-Health-Dog-Vaccinations-Bordetella-Vaccine-for-DogsGlobal 08/15 /14 techtimes.com: by Linda Nguyen – People afraid of contracting chikungunya from mosquitoes have reason to hope. A vaccine for the virus is currently undergoing its first stages of human trials. The vaccine so far has shown promise for protecting people from the chikungunya virus. The report is published online in the Lancet. “The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, and we believe that this vaccine makes a type of antibody that is effective against chikungunya,” said Dr. Julie Ledgerwood, leader of the study. This would be the first medication to treat or prevent this virus which manifests with fever and severe arthiritis. The Chikungunya virus has spread through Africa and Asia to the Caribbean, and now to the United States. The first domestic cases of the virus were reported in Florida last month when four Americans caught the virus. Ledgerwood said the next step in the clinical trials will be to test the vaccine on more people and more age groups since the current study looked at a relatively small 25-person group. She said the vaccine also has to be tested in areas where the virus is endemic to see whether it truly protects patients. She estimates that the testing will take another five years before it is on the market for the public. She added that it could be given to people living in the areas and to travelers and military personnel if it is proven to be safe and effective. – For complete article see http://www.techtimes.com/articles/13164/20140815/new-vaccine-may-ward-off-chikungunya-virus.htm

West Nile Virus (WNV):

santaclaractyhealthCalifornia 08/15/14 Santa Clara County Public Health: Officials have confirmed that five county residents have been infected with WNV. Two of the cases are the more severe neuro-invasive form of the disease. – See http://www.sccgov.org/sites/sccphd/en-u/Newsandevents/Pages/West-Nile-Virus-First-Human-Cases-2014.aspx

IDHW_col_stack_smallIdaho 08/12/14 ID Dept of Health: Officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the state so far this year in a Blaine County woman in her 20s. The woman was not hospitalized and is recovering. – See http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/AboutUs/Newsroom/tabid/130/ctl/ArticleView/mid/3061/articleId/1777/First-West-Nile-Infection-Reported-in-Blaine-County.aspx

LA-DHHLouisiana 08/15/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 13 new human cases of WNV, of which five are neuro-invasive disease infections, bringing this year’s total to 42 reported human cases. This week’s new infections include neuro-invasive disease cases in Caddo (3), East Baton Rouge (1) and Livingston (1) parishes. There were also new cases of West Nile fever reported from Caddo (4), Calcasieu (1) and East Baton Rouge (1) parishes, and asymptomatic cases in Ascension (1) and East Baton Rouge (1) parishes. – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3090

MS_71058_121809421211160_5406251_nMississippi 08/12/14 MS State Dept of Health: Officials have confirmed the death of a Yazoo County resident from WNV. So far this year, seven human cases of WNV have been reported in Adams, Hinds, Newton, Rankin(2), Yazoo and Wilkinson counties. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15486,341.html

Rabies:

Florida 08/14/14 Duval County: A stray cat that bit a man and his daughter in Jacksonville’s Southside neighborhood when they coaxed it out from under their car has tested positive for rabies. A Rabies Alert has been issued throughout their section of the Southside and Arlington effective until October. – See http://www.news4jax.com/news/man-daughter-bitten-by-rabid-cat-on-5731289-very-cute-child-with-a-cat-in-armssouthside/27488858

Pennsylvania 08/14/14 Northampton County: A stray cat found in by a woman in her yard in Glendon and delivered to the Center for Animal Health and Wealth in Williams Township has tested positive for rabies. Eleven people so far have been advised to receive post-exposure treatment for the virus including eight at the shelter, two at the Easton Animal Hospital, and the Glendon woman. – See http://www.wfmz.com/news/news-regional-lehighvalley/eight-getting-rabies-vaccine-after-contact-with-cat/27483698

austin-congress-bridge-bats_7335_large_slideshowTexas 08/14/14 Williamson County: Health officials are asking the public to help them identify a woman who may have been exposed to rabies in Round Rock when she was bitten by a bat while leaving the Wal-Mart on East Palm Valley Boulevard at about 9:15 pm, Wednesday, August 6th. She is described as white, possibly in her 20s and wearing shorts, flip-flops and a blue shirt. – See http://www.wcchd.org/news/press_releases/docs/2014_Wilco_Rabies_Incident_Release_080820114.pdf

Study finds ELK may adapt to CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE ~ BEAR attacks DANISH birdwatcher in CANADA ~ COLORADAN hospitalized with HANTAVIRUS infection ~ Interesting RABIES reports from MD, SC, TX & VT.

Bull elk bugling. Courtesy National Park Service.

Bull elk bugling. Courtesy National Park Service.

Wyoming 07/21/14 ktvq.com: A 10-year study conducted by the University of Wyoming and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department suggests that the effects of chronic wasting disease (CWD) on elk populations may not be as devastating as once believed. Research has shown that genes play a role in elk susceptibility to CWD. Some elk have genes that prolong the time between exposure to the CWD prion, the infectious agent of CWD, and the onset of the disease. These genes become dominant over many decades, greatly reducing the impact of CWD on the population. Elk with these genes live longer even when heavily exposed to CWD and therefore have more opportunity to reproduce than elk with other genes.

WY-2010-12-06_16-28-11_078Some people have feared that winter feed grounds for elk would concentrate the disease resulting in much higher incidence of CWD. “This study model essentially represents the worst-case scenario that would face feed ground elk,” said Dr. Terry Kreeger, retired state wildlife veterinarian for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “We predict a genetic shift over several decades favoring genes that prolong the incubation time of CWD resulting in elk populations that are able to persist in the face of the disease.”

WY_GFD-LogoScott Edberg, deputy chief of the Wyoming Game and Fish Wildlife Division states: “It helps to know that based on this research, if CWD should become established on feed grounds, we won’t see a devastating effect on populations as many have feared. This research also looked at how hunting would affect populations, and it appears, Game and Fish would still need to have hunting seasons to manage elk populations even if faced with CWD on feed grounds.” – See http://www.ktvq.com/news/study-finds-elk-may-be-able-to-adapt-to-chronic-wasting-disease-214986/

Bear Attack:

field_trip_atlas_of_canada_subsetCanada 07/22/14 Alberta: A 53-year-old tourist from Copenhagen, Denmark, was attacked by a bear on July 19th while looking for a good spot to birdwatch along the Powerline trail by Quarry Lake near Canmore. The man defended himself with his binoculars and there was a struggle, and the man suffered bruises and scratches, but the bear suddenly turned and left without ever so much as knocking the man to the ground. It’s believed the bear as feeding on berries and was startled. Fish and Wildlife officers have closed the area and set traps for the bear, but it hasn’t been seen since the attack. – For complete article see http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/alberta/blue+this+bear+attacked+recalls+Danish+birdwatcher/10052325/story.html

Hantavirus:

504f618286f53_preview-300Colorado 07/23/14 postindependent.com: Officials have confirmed a case of hantavirus in a Mesa County resident. The patient was being treated at a Denver hospital as of July 21st. – See http://www.postindependent.com/news/12325603-113/hantavirus-case-county-droppings

Rabies:

rabies.warningMaryland 07/21/14 Wicomico County: A feral cat found in the Friendship Road area of Pittsville has tested positive for rabies. Individuals recently exposed to a feral cat in the Pittsville area should call Animal Control at the county Humane Society. – See http://www.wboc.com/story/26072724/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-wicomico-county

South Carolina 07/23/14 Greenville County: A feral cat that was in contact with an area resident has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wyff4.com/news/cat-exposes-person-to-rabies-in-greenville-county/27108696#!bkT7Wj

can_you_helpTexas 07/23/14 Austin/Travis County Health: Officials are asking the public to help locate a man who may have been exposed to rabies. On Saturday, July 19th at approximately 10:30 a.m., a call came into Animal Services dispatch regarding a grounded bat. By the time APD arrived, a man had picked up the bat, running toward the Ann Richards Bridge.  If anyone has information, please contact our Disease Surveillance Program at 512-972-5555. Rabies exposure occurs only when a person is bitten or scratched by a potentially rabid animal, or when abrasions, open wounds, or mucous membranes are contaminated with the saliva, brain, or nervous system tissue of a potentially rabid animal. It may take several weeks or longer for people to show symptoms after being infected with rabies. The early signs of rabies can be fever or headache, but this changes quickly to nervous system signs such as confusion, sleepiness, or agitation. Once someone with a rabies infection has the advanced symptoms, that person usually does not survive. – See http://www.austintexas.gov/news/possible-human-exposure-rabies-2

Vermont 07/22/14 Chittendon County: A woodchuck that bit a South Road resident in Williston last weekend has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/local/2014/07/22/williston-woodchuck-test-positive-rabies/13013557/

Will the CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS become a threat in the U.S.? Scientist says “it’s only a matter of time”. ~ TULAREMIA killing RABBITS in COLORADO ~ FLORIDA reports five HORSES down with EEE ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CO, SD & TX ~ RABIES reports from CO & NY.

Aedes aegypti biting human. Courtesy U.S. Dept of Agriculture.

Aedes aegypti biting human. Courtesy U.S. Dept of Agriculture.

Global 07/01/14 nationalgeographic.com: by Karen Weintraub – Chikungunya (pronounced chick-un-GOON-ya) has plagued other parts of the world—particularly Asia and Africa—for decades, becoming more prevalent in recent years. But it arrived in the Caribbean only in December and has already infected as many as 250,000 people there. The virus is generally not lethal and can’t pass from person to person. But the pain it brings can be horrible—some who have weathered its wrath have said they wished the virus had killed them. In rare cases, the agony can last for months or even years. Public health officials in the Caribbean are struggling to contain the outbreak, in part because of the difficulty of limiting mosquito breeding grounds and because the disease is so new to the area. Paola Lichtenberger, director of the Tropical Medicine Program at the University of Miami, says she is sure the epidemic is more widespread than official numbers suggest simply because making the diagnosis is so difficult. Public health officials in the U.S. and around the world, meanwhile, are tracking cases carefully and encouraging people in affected areas to take precautions to avoid infections and to clean up areas of standing water. Airports in ten major American East Coast cities with Caribbean-bound flights have posted warnings to passengers about chikungunya.

81343_990x742-cb1404168438So far, 73 American travelers have brought the disease home from abroad and another 15 have been infected by mosquitoes in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, though it hasn’t yet reached mosquitoes in the continental United States. But it’s only a matter of time before that happens, according to Lichtenberger, who has helped treat three chikungunya patients since the outbreak began. – For complete article see http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140701-chikungunya-caribbean-mosquitoes-world-health/?rptregcta=reg_free_np&rptregcampaign=20140623_t1_rw_membership_r1p_us_dr_w

Tularemia:

colojackColorado 07/04/14 Larimer County: Officials confirmed on July 3rd that a rabbit found in Fort Collins has tested positive for tularemia, aka Rabbit Fever, a bacterial infection that is potentially life-threatening to humans. A die-off of rabbits has been reported in the area over the past few weeks. – For complete article including risks, symptoms and precautions see http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/2014/07/03/tularemia-found-southeast-fort-collins-area-rabbit/12205939/

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE):

eee-threat-249x187Florida 07/03/14 wcjb.com: A fifth horse has tested positive for EEE in North Central Florida. Three of the infected horses were reported stabled in Marion County, and two in Alachua County. – See http://www.wcjb.com/local-news/2014/07/fifth-case-eastern-equine-encephalitis-north-central-florida

West Nile Virus (WNV):

1184134480-mosquito2Colorado 07/03/14 CO Dept of Public Health & Environment: Officials have confirmed the state’s first two human cases of WNV so far this year reported in Saguache and Pueblo counties. – See https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news-release-human-cases-west-nile-virus-identified-colorado

South Dakota 07/03/14 SD Dept of Health: Officials have confirmed two new human cases of WNV in Codington and Lincoln counties. – See http://doh.sd.gov/diseases/infectious/wnv/documents/WestNileupdates2014.pdf

Texas 07/03/14 TX Dept of State Health: Officials have confirmed the state’s first human case of WNV this year was reported in Travis County. – See https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/20140703.aspx

Rabies:

rabiesAlert521d4-1Colorado 07/02/14 Yuma County: Officials have confirmed that a feral cat found near the Morgan Community College campus in Wray has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.yumapioneer.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6060&Itemid=39

New York 07/02/14 Tompkins County: A bat captured earlier this week in Montgomery Park in the town of Dryden has tested positive for rabies. It is known, and was reported, that three children using sticks poked at the bat on Monday, but no one knows who the children are. Officials need to determine as soon as possible if any or all of these children were exposed to the virus. The health department urges anyone who had contact or knows of anyone who had contact with a bat in Montgomery Park in Dryden to immediately contact them at 607-274-6688. – See http://ithacavoice.com/2014/07/officials-scramble-find-kids-poked-rabid-bat-dryden-park/

 

FLORIDA woman attacked by BLACK BEAR ~ TICK taken from CALIFORNIA park carrying TULAREMIA ~ IOWA reports first case of CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE in a wild DEER ~ RABIES reports from CT, GAx2, MA, NH, NJx2, NYx2, NC, TXx4, VT, VA & WI.

Black bear. Courtesy freepik.com.

Black bear. Courtesy freepik.com.

Florida 04/13/14 Seminole County: Officials are investigating a black bear attack that occurred in Lake Mary on April 12th around 8 p.m. Firefighters say they were called to a home at 1900 Brackenhurst Place after one of five bears rooting through trash at the residence attacked a woman identified as Terri Franna who was taken to a local hospital for treatment and later released. Wildlife officials say they have since put down four bears that did not appear to be fearful of humans, which is considered dangerous. The director of the state’s bear management programs said bears are looking for food this time of year and, if they can’t find it in your neighborhood, they’ll move on. – See http://www.clickorlando.com/news/woman-attacked-by-bear-in-lake-mary/25453094

Tularemia:

th777389546ddCalifornia 04/10/14 San Diego County: Officials have issued a warning to hikers and others who work or play in the great outdoors that a tick taken during routine monitoring in Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve, an urban park in San Diego, has tested positive for tularemia, also known as “rabbit fever”. Ticks in the U.S. that can transmit the F. tularensis bacteria include the dog, wood and long star varieties. Deer flies can also transmit the bacteria. Tularemia can be very difficult to diagnose. It is a rare but potentially serious disease. During 2001-2010, a total of 1,208 cases were reported from a total of 47 states, but more than half of the total number of cases were in MO, AR, OK, MA, SD and KS. – See http://poway.patch.com/groups/around-town/p/county-urges-public-to-protect-against-ticks-after-tularemia-find-poway

Author’s Note: For more information about Tularemia see http://www.cdc.gov/tularemia/index.html

Chronic Wasting Disease:

CWD-TitleIowa 04/09/14 IA Dept of Natural Resources: Media Release – The first case of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a wild Iowa deer has been confirmed. The deer was reported as harvested in Allamakee County during the first shotgun season in early December. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is currently working to obtain as much information as possible about the infected deer to implement its CWD response plan. “We have been testing for CWD in Iowa’s deer herd for more than a decade and are optimistic, given the extensive data we have collected, that we have caught this early,” said Chuck Gipp, DNR director. “The next step will be to focus our monitoring efforts in the area where the animal was harvested and work closely with local landowners and hunters to gather more information.” said Gipp.

Deer infected with CWD.

Deer infected with CWD.

CWD is a neurological disease affecting primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein, called a prion that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions. Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head. The only reliable test for CWD requires testing of lymph nodes or brain material. There is currently no evidence that humans can contract CWD by eating venison. However, the National Institute of Health and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that hunters do not eat the brain, eyeballs or spinal cord of deer and that hunters wear protective gloves while field dressing game and boning out meat for consumption. Prior to the positive detection in Iowa, CWD had been detected in every bordering state.

Rabies:

batinlaundryConnecticut 04/07/14 New London County: A bat captured in a Gales Ferry home on April 4th in the Eagle Ridge Drive area of Ledyard has tested positive for rabies. – See http://groton.patch.com/groups/around-town/p/bat-captured-in-gales-ferry-tests-positive-for-rabies-groton

Georgia 04/11/14 Hall County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert for the Persimmon Tree Road area after a raccoon that was in contact with a dog tested positive for the virus. This is the fifth confirmed case of rabies found in the county this year. – See http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/section/6/article/98112/

Georgia 04/10/14 Henry County: A raccoon that was killed by a dog on April 2nd in the City of McDonough has tested positive for rabies. Officials have issued a city-wide quarantine. – See http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/story/25214076/henry-county-issues-rabies-quarantine-88e779r0efor-mcdonough#axzz2ydBtnx7b

Massachusetts 04/07/14 Middlesex County: A skunk found near the Framingham/Southborough town line has tested positive for rabies. – See http://framingham.wickedlocal.com/article/20140407/NEWS/140406953

4541357140foxNew Hampshire 04/11/14 Rockingham County: A fox that attacked two children at the Don Ball Park in Derry on April 10th has tested positive for rabies. The animal knocked a boy down, and then bit a 5-year-old girl after she came down a slide. Police and wildlife officials finally cornered the animal in nearby woods and killed it, but in the interim the fox also attacked a porcupine and dog. – See http://www.wmur.com/news/fox-that-attacked-children-tests-positive-for-rabies/25438202

New Jersey 04/11/14 Monmouth County: Health officials have issued a Rabies Alert for the Middletown area after two raccoons tested positive for the virus this week. The first was found in the vicinity of Michael Drive off Nutswamp Road, and the second was found in the vicinity of Essex Street and Bray Avenue in the northern section of the township. – See http://www.ahherald.com/newsbrief/local-news/17351-rabies-alert-in-middletown

111009110345_Raccoon3 - CopyNew Jersey 04/09/14 Hunterdon County: A raccoon captured in the vicinity of Brown Street in Flemington has tested positive for rabies. The animal might have been in contact with several stray cats in the area. – See http://www.nj.com/hunterdon-county-democrat/index.ssf/2014/04/raccoon_cuaght_in_flemington_t.html

New York 04/11/14 Niagara County: A raccoon killed by two dogs on Stone Road in Hartland has tested positive for rabies. – http://wivb.com/2014/04/11/niagara-co-reports-first-rabies-case-of-2014/

rabidcatNew York 04/07/14 Oneida County: A man who tried to help what he thought was an injured cat was bitten on the hand last week when he picked the animal up. The cat later tested positive for rabies and the victim is receiving post-exposure treatment. – See http://www.wktv.com/news/local/Oneida-County-man-exposed-to-rabies-by-injured-cat-254233751.html

GA_Gray_Fox_6869North Carolina 04/10/14 Cumberland County: A fox that attacked two unvaccinated dogs on April 9th outside their owner’s home on Lake Upchurch Road in Parkton has tested positive for rabies. The owner of the dogs is being treated for potential exposure to virus when he grabbed the fox and broke its neck. – See http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/article_3ca95f9e-f7c3-5939-99fa-678cb761daaf.html

Texas 04/11/14 Wichita County: A second skunk has tested positive for rabies in the city of Wichita Falls within two weeks. The first was in the southern part of the city while this latest case is in the northern sector. – See http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2014/apr/10/second-case-rabies-wichita-falls/

2195804032_bb25565f77-copyTexas 04/11/14 Young County: Two skunks found in the City of Graham have tested positive for rabies. One was found near Pioneer Cemetery and the other in the northeast part of the city. – See http://www.grahamleader.com/ci_25546497/rabies-cases-reported-graham

Texas 04/10/14 McClellan County: A skunk found in the 600 block of Regina Drive in Hewitt on April 7th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.kcentv.com/story/25206822/skunk-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-hewitt

Texas 04/08/14 Bell County: A skunk that scratched a dog in the 4500 block of Lonesome Dove in Killeen has tested positive for rabies. – http://www.kxxv.com/story/25197702/rabid-skunk-spurs-caution-in-bell-county

lottaraccoons - CopyVermont 04/11/14 Chittenden County: Four raccoons trapped in Burlington and South Burlington in the last ten days have all tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.boston.com/news/local/vermont/2014/04/11/animal-rabies-found-near-vermont-largest-city/OTbD8fi44nBSYDmPkeRrDO/story.html

Rabid-cat-4-11-14 VaVirginia 04/11/14 Virginia Beach: A stray cat that was following children waiting for the school bus in the 1200 block of Warwick Drive has tested positive for rabies. Anyone who came in contact with the cat is advised to seek medical advice immediately. – See http://wavy.com/2014/04/11/cat-found-near-school-bus-stop-tests-positive-for-rabies/

help7689Wisconsin 04/09/14 Marathon County: Officials are looking for the owner of a large Rottweiler-type dog that bit a seven-year-old boy around 7:30 p.m. on April 8th near the corner of S. 5th Avenue and West Street in Wausau. The dog was wearing a dark green or black harness and was being walked by a woman with brown, shoulder length hair. She is believed to have been in her 30s and was wearing running pants and a bright pink shirt. Anyone with information should call the health department at (715) 849-7785. – http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/Health-Dept-Searching-for-Dog-to-Prevent-Boy-from-going-through-Rabies-Shots-254575171.html?ref=171

 

World traveler hospitalized in MINNESOTA with LASSA FEVER ~ UTAH confirms case of HANTAVIRUS ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: OREGON’s celebrity WOLF OR-7 may soon exit stage ~ RABIES reports from AZ, AR, CT, FL, GA, MD, NJ, NCx2, PA, SCx2 & VA.

Rat. Bing free use license.

Rat. Bing free use license.

Minnesota 04/04/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A man is in stable condition in a Minnesota hospital with Lassa fever after returning from a trip to West Africa, where an outbreak of Ebola virus is now raging. The Minnesota Department of Health said the man flew to Minneapolis-St. Paul on March 31 and soon after his arrival visited a physician. Because of his travel history and symptoms, the doctor suspected a possible hemorrhagic fever. The man was admitted to the hospital with fever and confusion and CDC testing confirmed a diagnosis of Lassa fever on April 3, the department and the CDC said in separate statements. “This imported case is a reminder that we are all connected by international travel,” CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said in a statement. “A disease anywhere can appear anywhere else in the world withinhours.”

Air routes connecting to and from Africa.

Air routes connecting to and from Africa.

Lassa fever is rarely seen in the U.S., with only seven cases recorded, the latest in 2010, according to the CDC. The agency reported that preliminary information suggests the man flew from West Africa to New York City and on to Minneapolis on another flight. The agency did not say where in West Africa the trip started. The CDC is working with public health officials and airlines to identify anyone who might have had close contact with the infected person, although Lassa fever is not easily spread from human to human. “Casual contact is not a risk factor for getting Lassa fever,” said Barbara Knust, DVM, a CDC epidemiologist in the lab that tested the patient’s blood for Lassa virus. “People will not get this infection just because they were on the same airplane or in the same airport,” she said in a statement.

RatthumbnailCANGBSFFThe Lassa virus is carried by rodents and transmitted to humans through contact with urine or droppings, but in some cases people can catch it from another person through direct contact with blood or bodily fluids, the mucous membranes, or sexual contact. “Given what we know about how Lassa virus is spread to people, the risk to other travelers and members of the public is extremely low,” Martin Cetron, MD, of the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, said in a statement. Between 100,000 and 300,000 cases of Lassa fever occur in West Africa each year, with up to 5,000 deaths. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/45120?isalert=1&uun=g632000d1042R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-04-04

Author’s Note: For more information on Lassa Fever see http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/lassa/

Hantavirus:

imagesCAULAVUQUtah 04/04/14 kcsg.com: The Southwest Utah Public Health Department (SWUPHD) has confirmed a case of hantavirus infection in Kane County. Hantavirus incidences are rare in the five-county region, with the last case being reported four years ago in Iron County. The virus is found in the droppings, urine, and saliva of rodents, usually deer-mice. “This time of year, a lot of people start spring cleaning in places where rodent droppings are found; such as sheds, barns, and cabins,” says Dr. David Blodgett, SWUPHD Health Officer. “If hantavirus is present, it can be inhaled and cause respiratory illness within a few weeks.” Hantavirus infection, called Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, starts with flu-like symptoms followed by difficulty breathing and can be life-threatening. Treatment includes intensive hospital care to deal with the respiratory distress. Hantavirus is not known to spread person-to-person. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.kcsg.com/view/full_story/24877415/article-Hantavirus-Infection-in-Southwest-Utah?instance=more_local_news1

Follow-Up Report:

Wolf OR-7:

(See previous posts dated 11/12/11, through 12/13/13)

graywolfNPRphotoOregon 03/29/14 missoulian.com: The wandering wolf dubbed OR-7 has enjoyed well over his 15 minutes of fame. But even with continued public interest, he could soon fade from the spotlight. The Global Positioning System collar that has sent regular electronic pulses to reveal his travels for the past three years has eclipsed its normal life span, and state and federal biologists don’t plan to replace it. “When that collar dies, we’ll never know his fate,” Rob Klavins of the conservation group Oregon Wild told the Mail Tribune newspaper. “But that could be OK. It’s good to have a little mystery in the world.“ The wolf gained celebrity status in 2011 after leaving a pack in northeastern Oregon, days after the state issued a kill order for his father and a sibling for preying on livestock.

wolfMost Oregon wolves on such journeys, called dispersals, have stayed in northeast Oregon or traveled to Idaho. The young wolf headed west with the tracking satellite following his moves as he fruitlessly searched for a mate. He became the first confirmed wolf in western Oregon since the last one was killed under a livestock-protection bounty program in 1937. He then crossed a state line and became California’s only confirmed wolf since 1924. He wandered throughout Northern California and almost traveled into Nevada before retracing his steps to southern Oregon, where he’s spending his time near Mount McLoughlin. The wolf will not be re-collared because biologists prefer to collar breeding pairs or members of packs. Collaring can be dangerous and time-consuming, and biologists would rather collar animals in other packs not sporting GPS collars to get information on their whereabouts and habits instead of an established bachelor like OR-7. – See this article at http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/oregon-wandering-wolf-s-signal-ready-to-fade/article_15a8644a-b6ac-11e3-aef0-001a4bcf887a.html. See 3/22/14 companion article about a group retracing the path of wandering Oregon wolf OR-7 at http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/group-retracing-trek-of-wandering-oregon-wolf-or/article_bad003c8-b121-11e3-bc24-001a4bcf887a.html

Rabies:

a898778rabies-alertArizona 04/04/14 Santa Cruz County: Officials have announced that the entire county is under quarantine after an outbreak of rabies reached record-breaking levels. The quarantine order, effective through December 31st, was issued after 23 positive cases of rabies were reported since January 1st of this year. The county recorded only 12 cases in all of 2013. – See http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/county-now-under-rabies-quarantine/article_1a9ef380-bc0e-11e3-a7b0-0019bb2963f4.html

323rabies-skunk_mediumArkansas 04/01/14 Pulaski County: A skunk that was observed behaving strangely near the 800 block of Buttercup in North Little Rock‘s Levy neighborhood has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/rabies-warning-in-north-little-rock/59358/GB4-wF9jxECoaYCA8PI3Gw

Connecticut 04/02/14 Hartford County: A raccoon that fought with two vaccinated dogs on Rogers Lane in Enfield on March 26th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.journalinquirer.com/towns/enfield/raccoon-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-enfield/article_84f6f590-ba68-11e3-acb9-001a4bcf887a.html

17858296_BG1Florida 03/29/14 Hernando County: A raccoon that fought with a vaccinated dog on Sun Hill Lane in Brooksville has tested positive for rabies. – See http://tbo.com/health/rabid-raccoon-reported-in-east-brooksville-20140329/

Georgia 04/02/14 Hall County: A raccoon that fought with a dog on Bowen Bridge Road in the Clermont area is the fourth wild animal in the county to test positive for rabies so far this year. – See http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=273283

17907533_240X180Maryland 03/31/14 Prince George’s County: A fox removed from the 4000 block of Woodrow Lane in Bowie on March 21st has tested positive for rabies. – See http://laurel.patch.com/groups/politics-and-elections/p/fox-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-bowie

raccoonrabid113524New Jersey 04/01/14 Atlantic County: A raccoon removed from the backyard of a resident in the 4000 block of Ridge Avenue in Egg Harbor Township is the third animal to test positive for rabies in the township so far this year. – See http://www.shorenewstoday.com/snt/news/index.php/egg-harbor-twp/eht-general-news/50867-third-case-of-rabies-found-in-egg-harbor-township.html

rabiesAlert521d4-1North Carolina 04/04/14 Cleveland County: Eighteen people are being treated for potential exposure to rabies after a Good Samaritan in the town of Lawndale adopted one of two puppies that were abandoned and were wandering along Elam Road. The adopted puppy began acting sickly and when brought to a clinic was diagnosed with and tested positive for the virus. Making matters worse, the other puppy ran away. Officials are warning area residents who might have been in contact with either of the puppies to seek immediate medical attention. – See http://www.wsmv.com/story/25158263/stray-puppies-leave-cleveland-co-neighbors-owing-thousands-of-dollars-in-medical-bills

320x240North Carolina 03/28/14 Cumberland County: A bat found between Pamalee Drive and Murhison Road in Fayetteville has tested positive for rabies. This is the 3rd case of the virus to be confirmed in the county this year. – See http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/article_1026ca27-0ce1-51f8-9ed6-2af733ba68ac.html

Rabid-Fox---26690055Pennsylvania 04/02/14 Montgomery County: A fox that was killed by a resident’s unvaccinated dog on the 2000 block of Weber Road in Worcester Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.timesherald.com/general-news/20140402/montgomery-county-health-department-confirms-fox-positive-for-rabies-in-worcester

Cat-RabiesSouth Carolina 04/01/14 Laurens County: A stray cat found in or near the town of Gray Court has tested positive for rabies. At least one person has been advised to seek treatment for possible exposure to the virus. – See http://www.independentmail.com/news/2014/apr/01/cat-exposes-person-rabies-laurens-county/

South Carolina 03/29/14 Aiken County: A man in his 20s has been advised to seek post-expsosure treatment for rabies after a raccoon entered his home on Limerick Drive in Aiken and scratched his face. The raccoon has since tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.aikenstandard.com/article/20140329/AIK0101/140329342/1004/man-recommended-to-undergo-treatment-after-rabies-exposure

crittersVirginia 04/04/14 Prince William Health District: A cat found on March 31st near Forest Glen Road in Woodbridge between Horner Road and Hylton Avenue has tested positive for rabies. And in Nokesville, four raccoons and a skunk have tested positive for the virus since July of 2013. A Rabies Alert has been issued for both communities. – See http://www.insidenova.com/health/health-district-warns-residents-about-rabies-in-woodbridge-nokesville/article_a439195c-bc3d-11e3-947e-0019bb2963f4.html