Tag Archives: Bear

Study projects how EBOLA VIRUS will spread ~ Promising EBOLA VACCINE abandoned a decade ago ~ NEW YORK & NEW JERSEY to quarantine all travelers with EBOLA contacts ~ CANADIAN killed when GRIZZLY invades cabin ~ First case of CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE found in OHIO captive DEER ~ FLORIDIAN contracts ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, LA, PA & SD ~ COYOTE attacks weed eater before biting NORTH CAROLINA MAN and other RABIES reports from CA & NC.

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Global 10/20/14 wsj.com: by Gautam Naik – Up to three Ebola-infected people could embark on overseas flights every month from the three most-affected African countries, according to a new study that projected travel patterns based on infection rates and recent flight schedules. The findings, published Monday in the journal Lancet, suggest that Ebola cases could be spread overseas by unwitting travelers from the worst-hit countries—Guinea, Liberia and Sierra who-logoLeone. The World Health Organization has estimated that, by early December, there could be as many as 10,000 new cases a week in west Africa. The upshot is “that controlling the outbreak at the source is the most important thing that needs to happen” to prevent the international spread of the ECE_522805_St-MichaelsHospitalvirus, said Kamran Khan, an infectious disease physician at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and lead author of the study.

Dr. Kamran Khan

Dr. Kamran Khan

The researchers’ analysis assumed no exit screening in the airports of the three African nations. In reality, exit screenings occur, but the authors contend that this doesn’t change their conclusion because screenings can miss travelers who don’t yet show signs of Ebola. A person can incubate the virus for up to 21 days without exhibiting signs of the disease. – For complete article see http://online.wsj.com/articles/ebola-study-projects-spread-of-virus-on-overseas-flights-1413846023?tesla=y

Money-vaccineGlobal 10/23/14 nytimes.com: by Denise Grady – Almost a decade ago, scientists from Canada and the United States reported that they had created a vaccine that was 100 percent effective in protecting monkeys against the Ebola virus. The results were published in a respected journal, and health officials called them exciting. The researchers said tests in people might start within two years, and a product could potentially be ready for licensing by 2010 or 2011. It never happened. The vaccine sat on a shelf. Only now is it undergoing the most basic safety tests in humans — with nearly 5,000 people dead from Ebola and an epidemic raging out of control in West Africa. Its development stalled in part because Ebola is rare, and until now, outbreaks had infected only a few hundred people at a time. But experts also acknowledge that the absence of follow-up on such a promising candidate reflects a broader failure to produce medicines and vaccines for diseases that afflict poor countries. Most drug companies have resisted spending the enormous sums needed to develop products useful mostly to countries with little ability to pay. – For complete article see http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/24/health/without-lucrative-market-potential-ebola-vaccine-was-shelved-for-years.html?emc=edit_tnt_20141023&nlid=57949252&tntemail0=y

0New York/New Jersey 10/24/14 medscape.com: by Robert Lowes – In the wake of New York City’s first Ebola case, New York and New Jersey will quarantine all healthcare workers arriving at two key airports from Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia for 21 days if they have treated patients with the deadly virus in those countries. The quarantine will extend to all travelers from the three countries who have had direct contact with an infected individual. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie announced the decision to impose quarantines this afternoon. Calls for this stringent measure have grown louder since Craig Spencer, MD, tested positive for the Ebola virus yesterday after he returned to New York City on October 17 from an assignment with Doctors Without Borders in Guinea. – For complete article see http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/833879?src=wnl_edit_newsal&uac=218349HV

Quarantine-Sign-NHE-18384_600Blog Author’s Note: Definitely a step in the right direction, but the people of the U.S. would be much better served if all travelers from Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia using all modes of transportation were quarantined for 21 days under penalty of prison terms and/or deportation. In addition, all commercial flights to and from these countries should be stopped until the virus is no longer a threat. Healthcare workers and other emergency personnel could travel in and out of these countries on military flights, which would also provide an optimal level of control. Yes, this would be costly to enforce, but if we can spend trillions protecting the American public from terrorists, we can afford a comparative pittance to protect them from the Ebola virus, which at the current survival rate could wipe out half of the U.S. population.

BEAR ATTACK:

Canada:

1306540277907_ORIGINAL.gRIZZLY.Yukon Territory 10/21/14 calgarysun.com: Claudia Huber, 42, a native of Switzerland and naturalized Canadian, died on October 18th as a result of injuries sustained when she was mauled by a 170 kg. older, male grizzly near her home in Johnsons Crossing, about 136 km southeast of Whitehorse. The grizzly climbed through a rear window into her cabin when Claudia and her husband, Matthias Liniger, fled but the grizzly caught up with Claudia. Matthias shot the grizzly, but not before Claudia was badly mauled. A little later that day, some 50 km away in theTeslin health center, Claudia died. The couple has lived in Johnsons Crossing since they came to Canada from Switzerland eight years ago to start a year-round adventure touring company offering like-minded Europeans an opportunity to experience their isolated lifestyle in the Canadian wilderness for short periods of time. – For complete article see http://www.calgarysun.com/2014/10/20/claudia-was-my-soulmate-says-husband-of-grizzly-attack-victim

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE:

whitetail deer 3Ohio 10/25/14 OH Dept of Natural Resources: Media Release – State officials have confirmed the first positive case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the state in a captive deer herd in Holmes County. The state continues to take quarantine action to control the further spread of the disease. There is no evidence that CWD has affected the wild deer population in the state. The positive sample was taken from a single buck on a hunting preserve in Millersburg and tested as part of Ohio’s CWD monitoring program for captive white-tailed deer operations. The preserve had been under quarantine since April 24, 2014, and was subject to intensive monitoring and sampling protocols because of a known connection to a captive deer operation in Pennsylvania that tested positive for CWD earlier this year. The quarantine will remain enforced until the state is satisfied that disease transference can no longer occur. The disease is fatal in deer, elk and moose, but there is no evidence CWD can be transmitted to humans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The World Health Organization. Though no human disease has been associated with CWD, the CDC recommends, as a precaution, that people or other animals do not eat any part of an animal diagnosed with or showing signs of CWD. – For complete release see http://ohiodnr.gov/news/post/first-case-of-chronic-wasting-disease-confirmed-in-ohio-on-private-preserve

ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS:

Mosquito_08849rt77Florida 10/22/14 Duval County: A 58-year-old female resident of the county contracted St. Louis Encephalitis but has fully recovered following treatment. This is the first human case of the mosquito-borne virus reported in the state of Florida since 2003. – See http://members.jacksonville.com/news/health-and-fitness/2014-10-22/story/first-st-louis-encephalitis-case-florida-03-found-duval

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

imagesCACMXFDXCalifornia 10/24/14 CA Dept of Public Health: Media Release - There were 46 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Colusa (1), Kern (1), Los Angeles (23), Orange (15), Placer (2), San Diego (1), Stanislaus (2), and Yolo (1). Twenty WNV-related fatalities have been reported to CDPH from ten local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (2), Los Angeles (3), Orange (5), Placer (1), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). Six hundred and eight (608) human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV thus far in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

Louisiana 10/17/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed two (2) new cases of WNV this week, but no new deaths. One (1) new case with fever was reported from Caddo Parish and one (1) new case with fever was reported from East Baton Rouge Parish. – For summary see http://www.dhh.state.la.us/assets/docs/SurveillanceReports/wnv/weekly2014/ARBO_1441.pdf

Pennsylvania 10/18/14 PA Dept of Health: The number of WNV cases statewide has now reached seven and Philadelphia has recorded  the first WNV-related fatality this year. – For a summary see http://www.westnile.state.pa.us/

South Dakota 10/22/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – 57 human cases of WNV disease have been reported statewide.   Status:  meningitis/encephalitis 21%, fever 79%; hospitalized 25%; deaths 0.   Counties with cases:  Beadle, Brown(6), Charles Mix(2), Codington(5), Day, Dewey(3), Edmunds(2), Faulk, Grant(2), Hamlin(3), Hand, Hanson, Harding, Hughes(4), Hutchinson, Jackson, Lawrence, Lincoln(3), Marshall, McPherson, Meade(2), Minnehaha(5), Sanborn, Shannon(2), Spink, Tripp, Union(3) and Walworth. – See http://doh.sd.gov/documents/diseases/WNVupdate10-24.pdf

RABIES:

HelpCalifornia 10/23/14 San Diego County: On Tuesday, a bat found near Pizza Nova on North Twin Oaks Road (in San Marcos) was found to be positive for rabies, according to county health officials. Five children spotted the bat under a tree near the restaurant a few days before the County Public Health Laboratory’s rabies result was confirmed. Concerns are that the children or others may have touched the bat, possibly exposing them to the disease. The county is looking for help in finding the five children and any others that might have been in the area and have come into contact with the animal, according to Craig Sturak, communications officer with the County Health and Human Services Agency. Contact the County’s Health and Human Services Agency by calling (619) 692-8499. – See https://thecoastnews.com/2014/10/county-looking-for-kids-that-may-have-handled-rabid-bat/

4904540_GNorth Carolina 10/17/14 tryondailyubulletin.com: by Leah Justice – A man weed eating his yard last Thursday evening was attacked by what he reported to be a coyote, according to Polk County Animal Control. Officers from the sheriff’s office said the man was weed eating around 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16 on King Stepp Road, off Grassy Knob Road (in Sunny View), when all of a sudden, the animal attacked the weed eater, then bit the man on the leg. The man immediately went to the hospital, where he received rabies shots and several stitches in his leg. Officers described it as a substantial wound. The man described the animal as a small coyote. The coyote was not captured. – See complete article at: http://www.tryondailybulletin.com/2014/10/17/sunny-view-man-attacked-by-suspected-rabid-coyote/#sthash.gcecZrlx.dpuf

North Carolina 10/23/14 Randolph County: A stray cat found in the vicinity of Robbins Farm and Kennedy roads in Trinity has tested positive for rabies. – See http://myfox8.com/2014/10/23/cat-in-trinity-area-tests-positive-for-rabies/

CANADA: HUNTER mauled by GRIZZLY and shot by friend in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ TEXAS HEALTHCARE WORKER infected with EBOLA ~ Current EBOLA outbreak believed due to consumption of BAT meat ~ CDC predicts CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS will spread in U.S. ~ MAINE reports first ever HUMAN case of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and heavy increase in ANAPLASMOSIS cases ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, IL & SD ~ RABIES reports from AL & NJ.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

British Columbia 10/12/14 globalnews.ca: by Negar Mojtahedi – A 56-year-old man has been transported by air ambulance to Calgary’s Foothills hospital after he was mauled by a grizzly bear and shot by his friend while hunting near Fernie, British Columbia. Early Sunday morning, conservation officers and emergency crews responded to reports of grizzly bear attack in the Elk Valley. “This is a somewhat remote area and there’s no history with this bear,” said Sgt. Cam Schley, a conservation officer from Cranbrook. The victim’s hunting partner shot and killed the 400 pound male grizzly bear. In the process, he accidentally shot his friend. His injuries are the result of being mauled by the animal and from gunfire. The victim’s hunting partner was not injured by the grizzly bear.

sebcmapDavid Karn, a spokesman for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, says the victim was in stable condition when he left the area. He is currently at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and is now believed to be in critical condition. The two men were not hunting grizzly bears. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1611225/grizzly-bear-attack-in-fernie/

EBOLA VIRUS:

EBOLA-texas-us-flag-monitorTexas 10/12/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A female healthcare worker who was involved in the care of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus. The unidentified worker, who was among those monitoring themselves for possible symptoms, developed a fever Friday night and told medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Less than 90 minutes later, the worker was in an isolation unit at the hospital, having driven to the facility, according to Daniel Varga, MD, the chief clinical officer at Texas Health Resources. A close contact of the worker is also “proactively” in isolation, Varga told reporters at a media briefing in Dallas. In a subsequent briefing, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said investigators believed the worker had only the one contact during the period when she may have been infectious. Varga said the patient and her contact are being cared for in a 24-bed intensive care unit that had been cleared for use by possible Ebola patients. He said he could not discuss the other aspects of the care of the patient. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins the county’s chief executive, said blood tests at the state reference laboratory in Austin, using polymerase chain reaction methods, showed the worker has Ebola. A second test, at the CDC, has not yet confirmed the finding, he said, but “unfortunately, we’re confident it will be.” Frieden said results of the confirmatory test were expected later on Sunday. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Ebola/48054?isalert=1&uun=g632000d2324R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-10-12

Straw colored fruit  bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Straw colored fruit bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Global 10/09/14 ibtimes.co.uk: by Hannah Osborne – People in Ghana eat bats because it is a readily available source of protein as well as being a luxury food, researchers have found. Experts at the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London were looking to find out why ‘bushmeat’ is so popular in the West African country despite the risks involved. Like many infections, Ebola is likely to have arisen from human interaction with wild animals. The current outbreak, which has killed almost 4,000 people, is believed to have come from hunting and eating bats. Researchers surveyed almost 600 people across Ghana to find out why the practice is so prevalent, despite the risks involved. Hunting and eating bats can lead to infection of ‘zoonotic’ pathogens, with the creatures in particular known for hosting more viruses than any other mammal. Transmission occurs from bites, scratches, bodily fluids, tissue and excrement.

Cambridge LogoFrom surveying hunters, vendors and bat meat consumZoological_Society_of_London_(logo)ad been bitten and scratched. None reported using protective equipment, such as gloves. Four of those interviewed said people fight over bats, sometimes lying over the animal while it was still alive to stop others from taking it – often resulting in injury. Bats were prepared and cooked in a variety of ways, with the most common being to smoke them and putting them in soup. Researchers said it appears bat bushmeat is both a source of sustenance and luxury food, as many hunters said they would keep their catches for themselves. Consumers reported high taste ratings and relatively high prices, suggesting it is a sought-after product. – For complete article see http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak-why-do-people-eat-bat-meat-1469295

CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS (CHIKV):

aaCDC-LogoWestern Hemisphere 10/07/14 cdc.gov: Media Release – Since the chikv outbreak began in December 2013, nearly 750,000 cases have been reported in the Caribbean and Central, South and North America. In the United States, 1,200 travelers have imported the virus to the United States, and 11 locally transmitted cases have been reported in Florida as of September 30. The mosquitoes that can transmit chikv are common in many parts of the Americas, including the United States. CDC anticipates that the virus will continue to spread to new areas in the Americas. In the United States, CDC experts believe chikv will behave like dengue virus. Imported dengue cases have led to small, sporadic local transmission in the continental United States but have not led to widespread outbreaks. – See http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p1006-chikungunya-in-americas.html

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

EEE54fgh84Maine 10/10/14 pressherald.com: A York County resident over 60 has been identified as the state’s first human case of EEE since Maine began testing for the virus in 1964. The individual fell sick in late July and was hospitalized in August, first in Maine and later in Massachusetts, but has since returned home to recuperate.- For complete article see http://www.pressherald.com/2014/10/10/first-maine-resident-tests-positive-for-eee/

ANAPLASMOSIS:

tickPreview2Maine 10/11/14 outbreaktoday.com: According to state health officials there have been 133 cases of anaplasmosis reported in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 94 cases reported during the same time period last year. That’s an increase of 39 cases, or more than 40% with three months remaining in the year. Nationally, the number of anaplasmosis cases reported to the CDC has increased from 348 cases in 2000, to 1,761 cases in 2010. The disease is tick-borne and people get the infection when bitten by an infected deer tick, the same one involved in the transmission of Lyme disease. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-reports-dozens-more-anaplasmosis-cases-compared-to-2013-2013/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 10/08/14 CA Dept of Health: Media Release - There were 60 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Glenn (1), Kern (2), Kings (1), Los Angeles (18), Orange (15), Riverside (4), San Bernardino (2), San Joaquin (2), Santa Clara (1), Stanislaus (3), Sutter (2), Tehama (1), Tulare (1), and Yolo (5). 16 WNV-related fatalities have been reported in to CDPH from in nine local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (1), Los Angeles (2), Orange (4), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). 488 human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

3495411871-1Illinois 10/07/14 DuPage County Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a female resident of Hanover Park in her 40s is the first fatality in the county due to WNV. State officials report two previous deaths due to WNV this year. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/WNVdeath2014

SDdhSouth Dakota 09/30/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 49 human cases of WNV statewide in 25 counties. – See Page 3at https://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Sept2014.pdf

RABIES:

Alabama 10/07/14 Covington County: A coyote found about three miles 1_62_coyote_snarlsouth of Andalusia in the Carolina community has tested positive for rabies.

New Jersey 10/07/14 dailyrecord.com: by Peggy Wright – A 69-year-old bow hunter from Cliffside Park used a knife and arrow to kill a rabid coyote that jumped him Sunday at the Black River Wildlife Management Area and a day earlier bit a bicyclist on Patriot’s Path, authorities said Tuesday. . . . The Cliffside Park man, whose name was withheld, was at the rear of the Archery Range at the management area on North Road when bitten around 12:55 p.m. on Sunday. State Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said the 34-pound male coyote “jumped” the man. Cris Cooke-Gibbs, the health officer for Chester and Washington townships, said the hunter was bitten on the face. – See http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/news/local/2014/10/07/cops-rabid-coyote-bit-two-chester-township/16847079/

CALIFORNIA WOMAN survives BLACK BEAR attack ~ Follow-Up Report: NEW HAMPSHIRE WOMAN looses battle with EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) ~ EEE report from NY ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CAx2, FL, KS, LA, MA, MS & NM ~ RABIES report from VA.

Black bear. Bing free use license.

Black bear. Bing free use license.

California 09/25/14 keyt.com: by John Palminteri – A Carpinteria Valley rancher was injured when she took on a 300-pound Black Bear Monday in what is called an “unprovoked” attack in an avocado grove. Emily Miles was on a walk around noon in Rincon Canyon near her home, when her two dogs bolted out of the trees followed by the bear. In moments the animal was on its hind legs and swinging at the woman who was trying to defend herself. Long red scratches on her back shows where  the bear claws shredded Miles’ shirt and tore her skin. Miles tried to get away, turning and running a short distance. That is when the bear chased her down, and took a bite into her upper left thigh. She hit the ground hard, breaking a rib and still vigorously turned over to kick towards the bear while screaming. “He took me down. He grabbed me. He sunk his teeth into my thigh and knocked me down,” said Miles. Blood was coming out of four puncture wounds from the bite, during the harrowing ordeal. “Looking at him, I knew he could kill me in an instant. He was probably 300 pounds and six feet tall standing,” said Miles. The bear reared back again, and Miles said the two stared eye to eye, before the animal came down on all fours, and slowly moved back into the trees.   After a few steps, the bear stopped and “walked away and kept looking back at me,” she said. – For video and complete article see http://www.keyt.com/news/breaking-woman-injured-in-bear-attack-on-a-carpinteria-valley-avocado-ranch/28232774

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

Follow-Up Report:

(See EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) report from NH posted 13 Sept 2014)

Eastern-Equine-EcephalitisNew Hampshire 09/24/14 conwaydailysun.com: by Tom Eastman – The Conway woman who was diagnosed with the EEE virus lost her battle with the disease Sept. 18 at the Gosnell Hospice House with her family by her side. Diane Catherine Humphreys, 51, of Haynesville Avenue in Conway, was diagnosed with the illness in August. The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services confirmed the diagnosis on Aug. 22. She was the first person in the state to be diagnosed with the mosquito-borne disease in five years. A second adult was diagnosed in early September in Hopkinton. That patient was recently discharged from the hospital, according to state epidemiologist Dr. Benjamin Chan, who spoke with The Conway Daily Sun Wednesday. – See http://www.conwaydailysun.com/newsx/local-news/116675-humphreys-51-of-conway-succumbs-to-eee

New York 09/24/14 citycentral.com: A second known human case of EEE in Onondaga County has been confirmed in a patient that is currently hospitalized. The first case was reported in August. – See http://www.cnycentral.com/news/story.aspx?id=1100809#.VCZFjRaOra4

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

disease%20cycleCalifornia 09/29/14 CA WNV: Officials have confirmed 375 human cases of WNV including 15 fatalities so far this year. – For individual county reports see http://westnile.ca.gov/

California 09/25/14 mercedsunstar.com: Merced County officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV. Both individuals were hospitalized but are recovering. – See http://www.mercedsunstar.com/2014/09/25/3868212_first-human-cases-of-west-nile.html?rh=1

Florida 09/23/14 FL Dept of Health Polk County: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the county’s first human case of WNV so far this year. The victim, a female resident of Lake Wales, is recovering. This is the seventh confirmed case in the state this year. – See http://www.mypolkhealth.net/pressreleases/

Kansas 09/26/14 kwch.com: Seven new cases of WNV have been reported statewide, according to the latest numbers from the Kansas Health Department. New cases have been reported in Barton, Comanche, Haskell and Pawnee counties. Four of the new cases are in Barton County, which now has two confirmed cases of the more serious neuro-invasive form of the disease. In total, 16 cases of WNV have been reported in Kansas so far this year. – See http://www.kwch.com/news/local-news/seven-new-cases-of-west-nile-confirmed-in-kansas/28275526

Louisiana 09/26/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 15 new cases of WNV, of which five were neuro-invasive disease infections, bringing this year’s total to 118 reported infections. This week’s new infections include five neuro-invasive disease cases in Ascension (1), Bossier (1), East Baton Rouge Parish (1), Ouachita (1) and Pointe Coupee (1) parishes. There were nine new cases of West Nile fever; these cases were in Caddo (3), East Baton Rouge (5) and La Fourche (1) parishes, and one new asymptomatic case in East Baton Rouge (1) parish. There were no new deaths reported this week. – See http://www.dhh.state.la.us/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3123

Massachusetts 09/23/14 MA Health & Human Services: Media Release – A female resident of Middlesex County in her 20s is the third human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The victim is recovering. – See http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/newsroom/press-releases/dph/third-human-case-of-west-nile-virus-in-mass-announced.html

Mississippi 09/29/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed three new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 40 cases including five deaths so far in 2014. The new cases were reported in Lowndes, Neshoba, and Rankin counties. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15640,341.html

New Mexico 09/23/14 therepublic.com: An 89-year-old Lea County man hospitalized for encephalitis has died of WNV. This is the state’s first WNV-related death this year, but eight human cases of WNV have been confirmed in the state so far this year. – See http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/e51b0f9fb38241f4b8cffb862e6e33a3/NM–West-Nile-Death-New-Mexico

RABIES:

cat-child66789Virginia 09/26/14 Grayson County: Two local residents are being treated following exposure to a feral cat that tested positive for rabies. An alert has been issued because there are other cats in this stray population. – See http://www.wvva.com/story/26636022/2014/09/26/rabid-cat-prompts-local-health-district-to-issue-rabies-alert

NEW JERSEY: Rutgers senior killed by BLACK BEAR ~ WYOMING hunter bitten by GRIZZLY ~ TENNESSEEAN killed by GRIZZLY in CANADA’S NORTHWEST TERRITORIES ~ Another COLORADAN gets TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from MS & TX

Courtesy Alaska Fish & Game Dept.

Courtesy Alaska Fish & Game Dept.

New Jersey 09/22/14 dailytargum.com: by Sabrina Szteinbaum – Darsh Patel, a Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences senior from Edison, New Jersey, was killed yesterday in a bear attack while hiking in the Apshawa Preserve in West Milford Township. President Robert L. Barchi emailed the University community yesterday informing it of the attack and sending thoughts and prayers to the 22-year-old’s family and friends. “I deeply regret to report that we learned this morning of the passing of another Rutgers student, Darsh Patel, a senior in the School of Arts and Sciences majoring in information technology and informatics,” Barchi said via email. “Darsh was killed in a bear attack yesterday while hiking with friends in a wooded area of Passaic County.”

apshawa preserve njBill Maer, the department spokesman for the Passaic County Sheriff’s Department, said a group of five hikers began the hike on the preserve. After a bear followed them, only four came out. After the hikers called the West Milford police, a search began for the missing hiker. Patel was found at around 5:54 p.m., according to nj.com. The sheriff’s office has ruled out foul play or criminal activity, and Maer said there were bear sightings in the general area where the hikers were yesterday. “We have not had a bear attack that I’m aware of in a long time, if ever,” Maer said. “Generally, there’s not much interaction between individuals and bears.” West Milford Police Chief Timothy Storbeck said the black bear was found and euthanized, according to nj.com. Larry Ragonese, the press director for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection said the last recorded bear attack in New Jersey was in 1852, and Sunday’s attack was “unique and unusual.” He also said West Milford is one of the most populated places in the state for black bears. – For complete article see http://www.dailytargum.com/article/2014/09/rutgers-senior-dies-in-bear-attack

bearspray8897Wyoming 09/22/14 trib.com: A grizzly bear bit a hunter in an attack in western Wyoming, sending him to a hospital with minor injuries, but officials said Monday they found no link to a bear that killed a man earlier this month. Two elk hunters surprised a female grizzly with two cubs Sunday just north of Dubois. The bear bit one of the hunters on the side, Wyoming Game and Fish Department Regional Wildlife Supervisor Jason Hunter said. The bow hunters fended off the animal with bear spray before one was treated for minor injuries at a hospital in Lander. Their names were not immediately available. Hunter said they did everything right by hunting in pairs and carrying bear spray. “The individuals knew what they were doing out there,” he said. – For complete article see http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/grizzly-bear-bites-hunter-in-wyoming/article_a7421f2b-38c9-5fa5-97a8-db4da1f6e234.html

Canada:

grizzlyattacking6657Northwest Territories 09/22/14 wctrib.com: by Tom Cherveny – A family with its roots in Renville County is mourning the loss of two brothers who died days apart, one in a tragic hunting accident. Ken Novotny, 53, of Germantown, Tennessee, died Wednesday when he was attacked by a grizzly bear while hunting southwest of Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada. Keith Novotny, 59, of Appleton, died Sunday. Friends said he was waiting for a kidney transplant. Their mother, Marjorie Novotny, learned the news of her second son’s death after reaching Tennessee to be with Ken Novotny’s family. He is survived by his wife, Brenda (Johnson), originally of Lake Lillian, and their three children.

mapNormanWellsNWTKen Novotny was hunting along the border with the Yukon when he was attacked by the bear, according to Dr. Cathy Menard, M.D., chief coroner for the Northwest Territories. The Commercial Appeal in Tennessee reported that a coach of the victim’s daughter said the bear “came out of nowhere” and attacked him as he was prepping a moose he had shot. The coroner said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police received a call for assistance from a guide accompanying Novotny on the hunt at 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Darkness and weather conditions prevented help from reaching the remote site in the Arctic that night. A helicopter reached the site the following morning. Novotny had died at the scene, according to the coroner. The guide was not harmed. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reported that the bear believed to have attacked Novotny was tracked and killed by staff with the Department of the Environment and Natural Resources. – For complete article see http://www.wctrib.com/content/friends-mourning-loss-former-olivia-grad-killed-grizzly-while-hunting-canada

TULAREMIA:

Media.aspx (2)Colorado 09/23/14 Weld County Dept of Public Health: Media Release – A Weld County resident living southeast of Erie was diagnosed with tularemia last week. The resident was hospitalized with a high fever, loss of appetite, and acute diarrhea and is now recovering at home. “This is the first human case of tularemia in Weld County this year” said Chery Darnell, Lab Manager for the Weld County Health Department. Additionally, a field mouse in northwest Johnstown and a rabbit southeast of Berthoud tested positive for tularemia. “We are seeing more than three times the usual number of human tularemia cases along the Front Range this year, so the public really needs to be cautious about not getting exposed to this disease,” said Darnell. – For complete release see http://www.co.weld.co.us/assets/2C80b9dbA1Ad162DDdab.pdf

Author’s Note: Officials have confirmed 10 human cases of tularemia in Colorado so far this year

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

wnv1_clip_image002Mississippi 09/22/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed two new deaths and 12 new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 37 human cases and five deaths so far this year. The deaths were reported in Lee and Coahoma counties. The new cases were reported in Adams, Carroll, Coahoma, Clarke, Forrest (2), Hinds (2), Jones, Lee, Monroe, and Washington counties.

imagesCAWX5STJTexas 09/22/14 texomashomepage.com.com: Wichita Falls health officials have confirmed two cases of WNV in the city. Area health professionals say a 48-year-old male was confirmed to be the first human case, while the second human case was a 19-year old male. The Centers for Disease Control lists people over 50 years old as those with the highest risk for the disease, but only about 1 in 150 people will develop severe symptoms. – See http://www.texomashomepage.com/story/d/story/two-cases-of-west-nile-confirmed-in-wichita-falls/12854/-uluDfCF_0SarcTSIhkFVw

BEAR kills researcher in WYOMING ~ Follow-Up Report: CALIFORNIA officials kill MOUNTAIN LION that attacked young boy ~ Another NEW MEXICAN contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ VERMONTER contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ 2 COLORADANS test positive for TULAREMIA ~ Travel Warning: 113 deaths in CARIBBEAN region attributed to CHIKUNGUNYA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from IL ~ RABIES reports from CT, MD, SC & TX.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Wyoming 09/15/14 go.com: by Bob Moen – A 31-year-old Utah man doing research alone in a remote backcountry area has died in a bear attack in the Bridger-Teton National Forest in northwest Wyoming. Officials aren’t certain yet what type of bear killed Adam Thomas Stewart of Virgin, Utah. “I’m assuming grizzly, but we don’t have the bear so I can’t say for certain,” Fremont County Coroner Ed McAuslan said Monday. “At this particular time we’re still putting stuff together.” Fremont County Undersheriff Ryan Lee said Stewart was in a remote area checking on a research plot when he failed to return as expected on Sept. 5. He was reported missing on Sept. 7, prompting a search. His body was found last Friday between his campsite and the research plot, Lee said.

washakie-wilderness01.gifStewart last contacted his employer on Sept. 4 from a trailhead, he said. Lee didn’t have the name of the company Stewart worked for. “It was a very short trip. It was basically an in and out type thing with at least one overnight stay,” Lee said. Stewart’s camp was found intact about 3 miles from where his body was found, he said. Lee and McAuslan declined to release what details led them to believe it was a bear attack. Jason Hunter, a regional supervisor with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, said investigators saw signs of both grizzly and black bears in the area where Stewart’s body was found. – For complete article see http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/bear-attack-wyoming-kills-utah-man-25517661

Follow-Up Report:

Mountain Lion:

s_mountain-lion-0002(See CALIFORNIA child attacked by MOUNTAIN LION posted Sept. 13, 2014)

California 09/12/14 kcra.com: Officials say DNA testing has confirmed that a 74-pound, 2-year-old mountain lion shot and killed on Sept. 10th is the same one that attacked a young boy on a hiking trail near Cupertino on Sept. 7th. The lion was treed before being shot just about 130 yards from the attack site. – See http://www.kcra.com/news/tests-show-slain-mountain-lion-attacked-boy-in-bay-area/28032766

Hantavirus:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

New Mexico 09/17/14 NM Dept of Health: Media Release – A 50-year-old man from San Juan County is hospitalized with laboratory confirmed Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). This is the fourth case of Hantavirus in New Mexico this year. An environmental investigation will be conducted at the home of the patient to help reduce the risk to others. “This case is another reminder that Hantavirus is present in deer mice in New Mexico,” said Department of Health Cabinet Secretary Retta Ward, MPH. “I want all New Mexicans to make sure they follow our prevention guidelines to keep themselves and their families safe from Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.” – See http://nmhealth.org/news/disease/2014/9/?view=136

Vermont 09/16/14 VT Dept of Health: Media Release – An out-of-state resident who was cleaning a poorly ventilated seasonal home last month contracted hantavirus. It’s most likely that the victim was exposed to rodent droppings that often carry the virus, which can become airborne during the cleaning process and cause a life-threatening respiratory illness. About one-third of those who contract hantavirus do not survive. – See http://healthvermont.gov/news/2014/091614_hantavirus.aspx

Tularemia:

Colorado 09/16/14 El Paso County Public Health: Media Release – A dead rabbit found south of Highway 94 and west of Yoder has tested positive for tularemia, also known as rabbit fever. – See http://www.elpasocountyhealth.org/news/news-release/2014/tularemia-found-baq4ijctzixmuu7acvc5eastern-el-paso-county-wild-rabbit

Colorado 09/18/14 Boulder County Dept of Health: Media Release – A Louisville resident has tested positive for tularemia after exposure to a dead rabbit while walking with her dog near Coyote Run Open Space in Louisville. The resident had a small cut on her knee, where the tularemia bacteria are thought to have entered her body. The resident was seen by multiple doctors after experiencing swollen lymph nodes, abdominal pain, and pain in the front of her knee. She developed a high fever, headache, and general malaise and was admitted to the hospital. Her condition has greatly improved, and she is recovering at home. This is the second Boulder County resident to test positive for the tularemia this year; nine people have tested positive for the disease in Colorado. In most of the cases, people were exposed to the disease while participating in outdoor activities, such as mowing or recreating in areas where sick or dead wildlife were present. – See http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/bc12.aspx?articleid=4212&zoneid=5

Travel Warning:

716ed7c4d80f74Caribbean Basin 09/15/14 foxnews.com: At least 113 people have died in the Americas, with all the fatalities reported in the Caribbean region, after becoming infected with the Chikungunya virus, the Pan American Health Organization, or PAHO, said, adding that it was not yet clear if these deaths were directly attributable to the virus. In its latest report, which includes figures as of Sept. 12, the PAHO confirmed 55 deaths linked to the virus in Martinique since last December, when the disease was first detected in the Americas. Forty-nine deaths were reported in Guadeloupe, six in the Dominican Republic and three in St. Martin, where the virus was first found in the Americas. . . . . . A total of 644,686 suspected and 9,640 confirmed Chikungunya cases have been reported in the region as of Sept. 8, the Caribbean Public Health Agency, or CARPHA, said. – See http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/health/2014/09/15/death-toll-from-chikungunya-hits-113-in-caribbean-paho-says/

West Nile Virus (WNV):

DuPage_logoIllinois 09/15/14 Dupage County Health Dept: Media Release – The first reported human case of WNV in the county has been confirmed in a male Naperville resident in his 50s. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/wnvhuman2014

Rabies:

help984-05834Connecticut 09/17/14 New Haven County: by David Moran – Police are seeking the public’s help in locating a man who dropped a bat off at a local veterinarian that tested positive for rabies because they fear he may have been exposed to the virus himself. An unidentified man left a box containing a live bat at the Mount Carmel Veterinary Hospital on Whitney Avenue in Hamden on Sept. 16 and then left without giving his name. The veterinarian chose to euthanize the bat and sent it to the Connecticut Department of Public Health where it tested positive for rabies. Hamden police said it is “strongly recommended” that the man who delivered the live bat to the animal hospital immediately seek medical attention to determine if he may have contacted rabies from the animal. Police describe the man as a black male between the ages of 18 and 25, standing approximately 5’10,” with a medium build and a “Mohawk-style” haircut. Anyone with information on this individual is asked to call Hamden Animal control at 203-230-4080. – See http://www.courant.com/community/hamden/hc-hamden-rabies-outbreak-0918-20140917-story.html

Maryland 09/17/14 Worcester County: A stray cat that bit an adult on Sept.15th at the Milburn Landing campground area of the Pocomoke River State Park in Snow Hill has tested positive for rabies. The cat was described as a medium adult male, dark gray with white under its chin and belly, with four white feet. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/story/news/local/maryland/2014/09/17/rabites-bite-worcester/15768459/

South Carolina 09/15/14 Anderson County: A stray cat in the southeastern part of the county that potentially exposed two people to rabies on Sept. 11th has tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.wyff4.com/news/stray-cat-exposes-two-people-to-rabies/28064590

Texas 09/17/14 Brazos County: The College Station Police Department Animal Control is investigating two dog attacks. The first victim says she was visiting a store in the 1900 block of Texas Ave Saturday evening when she was bitten by a dog. The dog was described as being brown and fluffy, medium in help-desk545451size, and of unknown gender and breed. She was not able to describe the dog’s owner.

The second attack happened Monday afternoon. The victim said she was at the dog park on Rock Prairie Road with her two dogs. When one of them ran towards the pond, the victim said another dog, described as a red/white male pit bull wearing a red collar, charged at her dog and began attacking it. The victim grabbed the back legs of the pit bull to get it off her dog. The pit bull turned around and bit the woman’s right hand. Animal Control is asking for the public’s help in locating these dogs to allow for observation and rule out possible rabies exposure to the victims. Anyone with information is asked to contact College Station Police Department Animal Control at (979)764-3600.

CANADIAN mauled to death by GRIZZLY sow ~ CALIFORNIA child attacked by MOUNTAIN LION ~ COLORADAN hospitalized with SEPTICEMIC PLAGUE ~ ILLINOIS reports increase in LYME DISEASE ~ OREGON’s celebrity WOLF OR-7’s mate also a wanderer ~ Travel Warning: CDC warns of CHIKUNGUNYA outbreak in AMERICAN SAMOA ~ EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) report from NH ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from NY, ND & SD.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Alberta 09/08/14 globalnews.ca: by The Canadian Press – Mounties say a hunter who had been missing in southern Alberta’s Kananaskis Country was found dead Monday after a fatal bear attack. RCMP would not confirm the identity of the hunter but it’s thought to be Rick Cross, a 54-year-old Calgary business man who was reported missing by his family after he did not return from a sheep hunting trip near PickleJar Lakes on the weekend.RCMP said a ground and air search was begun for the hunter on Sunday.

zCM-SouthwestAlberta“Evidence was located suggesting that the hunter had been injured at a location approximately four kilometres east from the PickleJar day use area parking lot on Highway 40,” RCMP said in a news release. “Search teams also encountered a female grizzly bear and cub in the immediate area.” The search resumed Monday morning, when teams found the man’s remains in the same area. “The hunter had suffered obvious trauma consistent with a bear attack and is believed to have died from those injuries,” said the release. “The hunter was alone at the time of the incident.” – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1552033/bear-kills-missing-hunter-in-kananaskis-country/

Mountain Lion:

cougar2498California 09/10/14 torontosun.com: Game wardens and hounds combed steep, wooded canyons and ravines for a third day near California’s Silicon Valley on Tuesday, searching for a mountain lion that injured a 6-year-old boy, but the cat has so far evaded trackers, wildlife officials said. The boy was hiking a trail with family and friends on Sunday in a densely wooded preserve adjacent to a winery, just west of the town of Cupertino, when the mountain lion pounced on him and tried to drag the child away, his parents told officials. The boy’s father and another man in the group rushed the cat shouting at the animal, and the cougar retreated into the woods. The boy was left with bite wounds and scratches to his upper body, head and neck, and was hospitalized following the attack. Kirsten Macintyre, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the boy has since been released and was home with his family, who officials have not publicly identified. A team of sheriff’s deputies, game wardens and a tracker with dogs immediately mounted a search for the lion, which resumed after daybreak on Monday and was extended into Tuesday with the addition of a second tracking crew, Macintyre said. She said motion-sensitive cameras also were being been set up in the vicinity, along with several live cage traps. On Tuesday, DNA from cougar saliva samples taken from the victim’s clothing showed the mountain lion was a male. From witness accounts and the size of paw prints left behind, the cat is believed to be a young adult, about three-quarters full grown, or roughly 90 pounds in weight, Macintyre said. If the animal is captured and its DNA matches the saliva samples, the lion will be killed in the interest of public safety, officials said. – For complete article see http://www.torontosun.com/2014/09/10/california-officials-hunt-for-cougar-that-attacked-boy

Author’s Note: California Dept of Fish & Wildlife officials said on Sept 10th that they have captured and killed the mountain lion believed to be responsible for the attack. – See http://abc7news.com/news/authorities-capture-mountain-lion-that-attacked-boy-in-cupertino/303485/

Plague:

types-plagueColorado 09/05/14 San Juan Basin Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed a human case of septicemic plague in a La Plata County resident. An investigation is underway to determine the source of exposure. The patient is currently receiving treatment. Bubonic plague is the most common form of plague; septicemic plague is seen less often. Symptoms typically include fever, chills, extreme weakness, abdominal pain, shock, and possibly bleeding into the skin and other organs. You can get septicemic plague from handling an infected animal or from bites of infected fleas. This is the second case of plague in La Plata County this year. Since 1957, Colorado has identified 65 cases of human plague, nine (14%) of which were fatal. – See http://sjbhd.org/public-health-news/

Lyme Disease:

ribbonIllinois 09/08/14 peoriapublicradio.org: by Hannah Meisel – Reported cases of Lyme disease are on the rise in Illinois. Instances of the illness have gone up about 250 percent in the last ten years. Melaney Arnold, with the Illinois Department of Public Health, says Lyme disease’s carrier — the deer tick — has a carrier of its own. “Very much like the name mentions, they typically ride on deer. So as deer migrate south, we do see some of that southern migration of the ticks.” – See http://peoriapublicradio.org/post/cases-lyme-disease-illinois

Wolf OR-7:

Remote camera photo of a wolf using the same area as the wolf known as OR-7. This is the first evidence that OR-7 has found another wolf in the Oregon Cascades. Photo courtesy of USFWS.

Remote camera photo of a wolf using the same area as the wolf known as OR-7. This is the first evidence that OR-7 has found another wolf in the Oregon Cascades. Photo courtesy of USFWS.

Oregon 09/05/14 oregonlive.com: by Lynne Terry – Oregon’s erstwhile wandering wolf OR-7 truly met one of his own when he mated with a small black female earlier this year: She, too, is a traveler and perhaps even from northeast Oregon as well. DNA tests on her scat indicate she came from northeast Oregon or even Idaho. She shares bloodlines with the Minam and Snake River packs, which include wolves from both those areas, said John Stephenson, wolf coordinator for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. That means she traveled several hundred miles or more to the western Cascades where she mated with OR-7 earlier this year. “It’s fascinating that after dispersing such a great distance to an area where there are so few wolves that they were able to find one another,” Stephenson said.

Oregon's erstwhile wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that were born in April. Photos by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Oregon’s erstwhile wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that were born in April. Photos by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

OR-7 was born into the Imnaha Pack in northeast Oregon, then traveled several thousand miles to California and back to Oregon looking for territory and a mate. The two produced offspring in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in April. Biologists gathered scat from the area in May and July and sent the samples to the University of Idaho for DNA testing. They also collected images of OR-7’s mate and three pups, all snapped by stationary, motion-detecting cameras in the wilderness. The results do not pin down the birthplace of the small, black female but indicate her heritage. – For photos and complete article see http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/09/oregon_wolf_or-7_pups_are_his.html

Travel Warning:

300px-Flag_of_American_Samoa.svgAmerican Samoa 09/09/14 Outbreaknewstoday.com: Post by Robert Herriman – Since the chikungunya outbreak was first geography-of-american-samoa0recognized in American Samoa in late July, the case count has grown to more than 700 cases. This is the first report of locally transmitted chikungunya in Samoa. – For complete post see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/cdc-travel-notice-issued-for-american-samoa-chikungunya-outbreak-now-over-700-cases-64070/

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE):

EEE54fgh84New Hampshire 09/10/14 NH Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the second human case of EEE this season in an adult from Hopkinton. The first human case of EEE in New Hampshire this season was confirmed on August 22nd in Conway, NH. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2014/09-sept/09102014eeecase.htm

West Nile Virus (WNV):

NY-HealthDept-LargeNew York 09/08/14 NYC Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the season’s first human cases of illness with WNV in five New York City residents, all over the age of 50. Two patients reside in Brooklyn, and one each from Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan. Three of the patients were hospitalized and diagnosed with meningitis; all have been discharged. The other two cases did not require hospitalization. – For complete release see http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pr2014/pr031-14.shtml

Logo677854North Dakota 09/09/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – WNV Surveillance Coordinator Alicia Lepp has announced the state’s first WNV-related death in 2014. The individual was a woman who was hospitalized and was older than 60 years of age. Today’s report brings the total number of cases in North Dakota this season to12. – For complete release see http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-09-09-First%202014%20WNV%20Human%20Death-v%20FINAL.pdf

index5587155South Dakota 09/09/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 31 human cases of WNV in 18 counties so far this year. – See http://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Aug2014.pdf

Study suggests SEAL VIRUS H3N8 is a threat to humans ~ PENNSYLVANIA child dies of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER ~ BLACK BEAR trees WASHINGTON BOW HUNTER ~ Follow-Up Report: WEST VIRGINIA BEAR sow judged NOT GUILTY ~ COLORADO child contracts TULAREMIA ~ COLORADO confirms third & fourth human cases of TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from FL, MS & NE ~ RABIES reports from NJ & ND.

Atlantic Harbor Seal. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife.

Atlantic Harbor Seal. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife.

National 09/05/14 breitbart.com: by William Bigelow – The scientific journal Nature Communications has published the results of a study conducted by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that focused on an avian influenza virus that left harbor seals dead along the New England coast, and their findings indicate that the virus poses a threat to humans. The H3N8 virus that killed the seals was found spreading through ferrets in separate cages by respiratory transmission, which 5454598is not the usual case with avian flu viruses, so scientists are worried that it could be transmitted through humans in an airborne manner. . . . Avian H3N8 was responsible for a human flu pandemic in the 1880s. There has been no evidence that the 2011 version that killed the seals resulted in human illness, but there is another virus that was transmitted from seals to humans who were in close contact with them. The study’s first author, Erik Karlsson, Ph.D., warned that surveillance of flu viruses in wild and domestic animals needs to be prioritized. . . . In the St. Jude study, two of the three animals that were exposed to H3N8 from respiratory transmission became infected with minimum symptoms. Researchers also wanted to see if humans vaccinated against seasonal flu strains were immune to the H3N8 virus; they were not. The researchers asserted, “The transmissibility of the seal H3N8 virus coupled with the apparent lack of immunity makes this strain a concern.” – For complete article see http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/09/04/Seal-Virus-Threat-to-Humans

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever:

188737k8Pennsylvania 09/05/14 Dauphin County: Officials have confirmed that a child from the Harrisburg area who recently died contracted Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, which is carried by dog ticks. The disease can be severe but is rarely fatal if treatment with antibiotics begins within a few days after symptoms first appear. – For complete article see http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/09/rocky_mountain_spotted_fever_m.html

 

Bear Attacks:

CAT SCARES BEAR TOPIXWashington 09/05/14 columbian.com: by Shari Phiel – When Longview resident Jerry Hause headed out for Monday’s bow hunting opener, he never imagined he would end up in a fight for his life with a black bear. Hause and his son Jeffrey, 26, drove into a remote, wooded area in the upper Abernathy Creek area about eight miles west of Longview in hopes of bagging deer. Hause, 60, has been hunting for decades, but he’s been a bow-hunter for only four. Hause was about to start driving game toward his son, who was waiting in a tree, when the unexpected happened. “I’d already hiked about three miles so I sat down to take a break before I tried to push some (game) back to him. I took my backpack off and sat my bow down and as I was sitting there I started looking around and … I saw a black head which I thought was a bear,” Hause said from his home Thursday. “I’ve hunted this area for 30-plus years and I’ve never seen a bear up there.” Hause said the bear appeared to be a cub and was 80 to 100 yards away. Knowing knew it’s unwise to come between a cub and its mother, he looked for a way to leave the area. “I stood up and in one motion that bear jumped out of the creek it was in and was on level ground with me. And as soon as it was on level ground it was on a dead run after me,” he said. He doesn’t know if the bear was the mother or the same bear he’d thought was a cub. Hause said he knew he wouldn’t be able to pick and aim his bow, and he wasn’t confident he could drop the 250- to 300-pound animal. His only choice, he said, was to climb the tree he had been resting against. “I knew the tree was right there, so I headed up that to get far enough up the tree that the bear couldn’t get me,” Hause said. Hause climbed several feet up into the tree. The bear followed, but Hause said he thought he was out of the bear’s reach until he looked down just as the bear bit into his left leg. “It totally amazes me how fast that bear got on me. In three seconds it was on me,” he said. Hause said the bear also tried to grab him with one of its paws and left claw marks on his leg. He said he realized he couldn’t climb any higher, so he grabbed a branch above him and held on. “I was thinking, ‘If it gets me out of this tree I’m a dead man.’ It was mad, it was growling. It was serious about what it was going to do,” Hause said. Hause pulled himself and kicked out at the bear with his other foot. Having heard on wildlife shows that sharks will sometimes stop an attack after being hit in the nose, Hause aimed for the bear’s nose. The waStateMapmaneuver seemed to work. The bear let go and dropped to the ground and then moved off. After waiting 10 minutes, Hause said he got out of the tree and began hiking back to his truck. Once he got to an area where he could make a call on his cell phone, he alerted his son and called his wife, who came and took him to PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center. He was treated and released and is expected to make a full recovery from his puncture and scratch wounds.

Washington Fish and Wildlife Sgt. Bob Weaver said the chances of encountering a bear in the woods, let alone being attacked by one, are very slim. “This is are very rare incident. It’s happened before, but it’s a very rare thing to happen,” Weaver said. Statewide, there are an estimated 25,000 to 30,000 black bears. Weaver didn’t know how many bears there are in the Cowlitz County area. – For complete article see http://www.columbian.com/news/2014/sep/05/bear-attacks-bites-bow-hunter-near-longview/

Follow-Up Report

(See: MAN and DOG attacked by BLACK BEAR sow in WEST VIRGINIA posted August 29, 2014)

dogs-must-be-leashed-sign-k-0102West Virginia 09/04/14 newsplex.com: by James Gilbert – Just a few weeks ago a Staunton man had an encounter with a bear that sent him to the hospital. When we look back at bear attacks, they seem to be more like bear defense. “These are most often not bear attacks at all. In every single one of the cases in which we are aware, there’s been a human with a dog off the leash on public land,” comments Ed Clark, Wildlife center of Virginia president. In this case of a Virginia man being attacked, his dog was off the leash and ran towards some cubs. The owner’s reaction was to ‘rescue’ his dog, and momma bear took a man running at her cubs as a threat. “The dog was described as some kind of hero, well perhaps he did in fact save the owner from more severe injuries, but it was the dog who precipitated the attack in the first place, or more technically it was the human who failed to comply with the law about keeping the dog on a leash,” states Clark, who knows how smart and mostly non-violent black bears are. Dogs must be on a leash at all times on any public land unless otherwise noted. Many dog owners know this. – For complete article and video see http://www.newsplex.com/home/headlines/Bear-Attack-Might-be-More-Than-it-Seems-274024081.html

Tularemia:

Colorado 09/03/14 Boulder County: A child in Longmont and two rodents in Boulder have tested positive for tularemia. – See http://www.timescall.com/longmont-local-news/ci_26464004/boulder-county-sees-first-human-case-rabbit-fever

_rabbit_feve_198874000Colorado 09/05/14 Larimer County: A county resident has been stricken with the third human case of tularemia in the state this year. The victim is thought to have been infected by inhaling the bacteria while mowing tall grass in an area where infected rabbits were previously present. – See http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/local/2014/09/05/second-human-case-tularemia-confirmed-larimer/15135067/

Colorado 09/06/14 Larimer County: A second resident of the county has been confirmed to have tularemia, a bacteria also known as rabbit fever. Both adults who were treated for tularemia in Larimer County are believed to have been infected while mowing tall grasses in an area frequented by rabbits. – See http://www.reporterherald.com/lifestyles/health/ci_26479036/second-human-tularemia-case-reported-locally

55468i7West Nile Virus (WNV):

Florida 09/05/14 FL Dept of Health/Volusia County: Media Release – A suspect human case of WNV illness is under investigation awaiting state lab confirmation. The case involves a 34 year old female. WNV is most commonly transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. There are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent WNV infection. – See http://www.floridahealth.gov/chd/volusia/NewsReleases/2014-wnv-extended.pdf

MS_71058_121809421211160_5406251_nMississippi 09/08/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed five new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 24 cases so far in 2014. The new cases were reported in Forrest (2), Harrison (1), and Hinds (2) counties. So far this year, human WNV cases have been reported in the following counties: Adams (2), Bolivar (1), Covington (1), Forrest (4), Harrison (1), Hinds (6), Lauderdale (1), Madison (1), Newton (1), Rankin (4), Yazoo (1), and Wilkinson (1). Three WNV deaths have occurred, in Forrest, Madison, and Yazoo counties. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15578,341.html

5323g446Nebraska 09/03/14 Two Rivers Public Health Dept: Media Release – Three cases of the more severe form of WNV have been confirmed within the department’s jurisdiction during the last two weeks. All of the victims have been hospitalized. – See http://www.trphd.org/Resources/PressReleases/ArticleDisplay/tabid/68/ArticleId/404/Protect-Yourself-from-West-Nile-Virus-during-Fall-Activities.aspx

Rabies:

groundhogNew Jersey 09/08/14 Middlesex County: A groundhog that appeared to be sick was found Sept. 4th in a vacant field in the vicinity of Cortland Street and Hall Avenue in Perth Amboy. Officials confirmed today that the animal tested positive for rabies. One person was potentially exposed to the virus. – See http://www.nj.com/middlesex/index.ssf/2014/09/rabid_groundhog_found_in_perth_amboy.html

3610192083_22eaf9db7aNorth Dakota 09/05/14 Ward County: A kitten that was part of a litter of six sold at Amy’s Pet Parade in Minot has tested positive for rabies. The litter was anonymously dropped off at the pet shop and the last kitten was sold this week. Officials are urging anyone exposed to the kittens since August 22nd should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.kentucky.com/2014/09/05/3414061_kitten-purchased-in-nd-tests-positive.html?rh=1