Tag Archives: Bobcats

CALIFORNIAN attacked by BOBCAT ~ DEER farm in IOWA is new CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE title holder ~ COLORADO warns HUNTERS of widespread TULAREMIA ~ RABIES reports from MD & VA.

Bobcat. Courtesy National Park Service.

Bobcat. Courtesy National Park Service.

California 10/02/14 keyt.com: by Claire Scholl and Tracy Lehr – A 65-year-old woman is recovering in the hospital from multiple bobcat bites and scratches to her hand, arm and neck. The attack occurred at the Alisal Guest Ranch at about 12:30 p.m. Thursday. State Department of Fish and Wildlife officers said the woman, who works at the ranch, was eating lunch at a picnic table around the corner from the ranch entrance when she was attacked. They did not know what she was eating, but they said she tried to push the bobcat away but the animal came back. Officers said the bobcat had mange and looked emaciated. They found the bobcat beneath a wooden bridge nearby and killed it. Ranch guests said they heard a shot fired. They saw the dead animal and said it looked like it may have been in poor health before the incident. Some people think the drought is pushing animals out of the hills to search for food and water. The ranch is in the 1000 block of Alisal Road just a few miles from Solvang. – For video and complete article see http://www.keyt.com/news/woman-attacked-by-bobcat-while-eating-lunch/28377576

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD):

HEADERIowa 10/04/14 jsonline.com: by Paul A. Smith – In the world of deer hunting, records are kept of antler size, deer harvests and license sales. States and hunters often claim bragging rights. There’s a flip side, too. News came Thursday that Iowa claimed a dubious title previously held by Wisconsin. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced 284 of 356 deer (80%) from a captive herd in north-central Iowa tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The finding represents the highest number of CWD-positive animals detected at a facility, according to wildlife health officials. “This is what happens when you allow disease to sit and percolate on a game farm,” said Bryan Richards, the CWD project leader at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison.

Deer with CWD.

Deer with CWD.

A deer farm near Portage, Wis., is infamous for having 60 of 76 deer test positive for the disease in 2006. Wisconsin purchased the farm in order to keep fences in place and prevent wild deer from entering the property. However, in 2013 a wild deer near the facility tested positive for the disease. To help combat the spread of CWD, Wisconsin has banned baiting and feeding of deer in 35 counties and requires CWD tests on all animals that die on deer and elk farms. CWD is a progressive, degenerative neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose. There is no known treatment. CWD is similar to other prion diseases including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) and human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. CWD has not been linked to human illness, but the Centers for Disease Control recommends humans not consume meat from CWD-positive animals. – For complete article see http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outdoors/iowa-deer-farm-riddled-with-chronic-wasting-disease-b99364005z1-278133231.html

TULAREMIA:

tularemia-pueblo-county-jpgColorado 10/01/14 CO Dept of Public Health: Media Release – October is the beginning of small game hunting season in Colorado. As the number of human tularemia cases in our state continues to rise, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reminds small game hunters to “hunt healthy” this year.  “We haven’t seen this many tularemia cases in Colorado since the 1980s,” said State Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Jennifer House. “Historically, we see cases of tularemia in hunters, and the disease is so widespread this year, we want to make sure our hunters understand the risks.” “In the last 10 years Colorado has averaged three human cases of tularemia a year,” Dr. House said. “So far in 2014 we have had 11, and additional suspected cases are under investigation.”

zoonosis_TularemiaLocal health departments have received numerous reports of rabbit and rodent die-offs across the state this year. Animals from 12 counties tested positive for tularemia, a bacterial disease that can affect small game animals. It commonly causes illness and death in rabbits and rodents such as squirrels. People can get tularemia if they handle infected animals or are bitten by ticks or deer flies. People also can be exposed to tularemia by touching contaminated soil, drinking contaminated water or inhaling bacteria. Hunters are most at risk when skinning game and preparing and consuming the meat. – For precaution and complete release see https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news/tularemia-hunters

RABIES:

Maryland 10/01/14 Baltimore County: A male, gray-striped tabby cat, possibly with a limp, found in the vicinity of Delight Road in Reisterstown has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wbaltv.com/news/cat-5731289-very-cute-child-with-a-cat-in-armsfrom-reisterstown-area-tests-positive-for-rabies/28357964

Virginia 10/01/14 Warren County: A domestic short hair orange tabby cat with white feet and white belly that attacked a person on Fletcher Street near the Happy Creek Bike Trail in Front Royal on September 29th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.nvdaily.com/news/2014/10/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies.php

CONNECTICUT woman attacked by RABID BOBCAT ~ FLORIDA confirms 3 new locally-acquired cases of DENGUE FEVER ~ FLORIDA confirms 7th locally-acquired case of CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from LA & NJ ~ RABIES reports from CO & FL.

Bobcat. Courtesy WI Dept of Natural Resources.

Bobcat. Courtesy WI Dept of Natural Resources.

Connecticut 09/01/14 foxct.com: by Samantha Schoenfeld – A woman was attacked by a bobcat in Bozrah on Saturday, Aug. 30, according to Cindy Chanaca, a spokeswoman from the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. She was attacked in her backyard on Stanton Hill Road, and was then taken to Backus Hospital in Norwich for treatment, but there’s no word on the extent of her injuries. DEEP did not find a bobcat in Bozrah, but on Sunday the department’s Environmental Conservation Police responded to reports of a bobcat sighting in Lebanon on Sunday. The calls came from the area of Norwich Avenue and Waterman Road. ENCON euthanized the bobcat. ENCON believes it is the same one that attacked the woman because of the close proximity to Stanton Road and because the bobcat had injuries consistent with the attack on the woman.

index 09/02/14: The bobcat tested positive for rabies. DEEP Environmental Conservation Police and wildlife experts released the following information about bobcats: Bobcats are common in Connecticut and found in most towns throughout the state. They are secretive, solitary and seldom observed, tending to hunt and travel in areas of thick cover.   Compared to many wildlife species, bobcats rarely cause conflicts with human activities and rarely contract rabies.  For more information visit:  www.ct.gov/deep/bobatfacts

For photos and original article see http://foxct.com/2014/09/01/bobcat-attacks-woman-in-bozrah/

 

Dengue Fever:

Florida 08/29/14 FL Health Miami-Dade County: Media Release – Officials are urging residents to take precautions against mosquito-borne illness following the investigation of three additional locally-acquired cases of dengue fever. Dengue-Fever_10459The three cases include a 49-year-old and two 64-year-old individuals. This brings the total of locally-acquired dengue cases for 2014 in Miami-Dade County to four. – See http://www.dadehealth.org/public/PUBLICnewsarticle.asp?newsID=2226&typeID=&news_type=Press+Releases

Chikungunya Fever:

Florida 08/29/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: State officials have confirmed a seventh locally-acquired case of chikungunya fever in the state, and the second case in St. Lucie County. The person was hospitalized but is recovering. In addition to the two autochthonous cases in St. Lucie County, one autochthonous case was reported in a Miami-Dade resident in June, and four autochthonous cases have been confirmed in Palm Beach County. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/st-lucie-county-confirms-2nd-local-chikungunya-case-floridas-7th-local-transmission-27521/

 

West Nile Virus (WNV):

LA-DHHLouisiana 08/29/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed nine new human cases of WNV, of which five were neuro-invasive disease cases, bringing this year’s total to 61 reported infections. Louisiana continues to have the nation’s second highest number of WNV neuro-invasive disease cases. This week’s new infections include five neuro-invasive disease cases, all in East Baton Rouge Parish. There were four new cases of West Nile fever; Ascension (1), Caddo (1) and East Baton Rouge (2) parishes. – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3100

NJDOH-LogoNew Jersey 08/22/14 NJ Dept of Health: Mosquito-borne virus Update – So far this year officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV in the state in the following counties: Gloucester and Monmouth. – See http://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/westnile/documents/results_aug22_14.pdf

 

Rabies:

jimwhitejrasaboyholdingbatHelpCardColorado 09/01/14 Pueblo County: Health officials in Pueblo County are urgently asking for the public’s help in identifying children who played with a rabid bat over the weekend. According to the Pueblo City-County Health Department, the children were playing with the bat between Wednesday and Sunday at the Sangre de Cristo Housing Apartments. Officials said contacting the children is “critical” and that they need to identify the kids “immediately.” – See http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_26447892/pueblo-health-officials-urgently-seek-kids-who-played

3610192083_22eaf9db7aFlorida 09/01/14 Suwannee County: Health officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a cat tested positive for the virus. The alert covers an area in the county that is south of Highway 90 and West 185th Road. – See http://www.wtxl.com/news/rabies-alert-issued-in-suwannee-county/article_df716a44-3224-11e4-8467-0017a43b2370.html

BEAVER attacks kayaker in upstate NEW YORK – ALASKAN victim of unprovoked GRIZZLY attack – HANTAVIRUS deaths in NEW MEXICO, NORTH DAKOTA & CANADA – ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER kills CALIFORNIAN – WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from AZ, CA, MS, MO & TN – RABIES reports from GAx3, MD, NJ, NYx2 & VT.

American Beaver. BING free use license.

American Beaver. BING free use license.

New York 06/16/14 Monroe County: A Lima resident is receiving post-exposure prophylactic rabies shots after a beaver jumped out of Irondequoit Creek in Rochester and attacked him, knocking him from his kayak and into the water. The victim was treated for bite wounds on his back and deep puncture wounds on his arm. A bystander responding to the commotion hit beaver2the beaver with a paddle several times before the animal let go and disappeared beneath the surface of the creek, and when it returned a few seconds later he hit it again, breaking the paddle. The beaver’s carcass was recovered and is being tested for the rabies virus.- See http://www.13wham.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/beaver-attacks-pulls-man-off-kayak-13005.shtml

Grizzly:

grizzly5Alaska 06/25/14 Valdez-Cordova Census Area: by Josh Staab – A Slana man was visiting a friend’s home Tuesday afternoon when Alaska State Troopers say he was suddenly attacked by an adult grizzly bear. The attack left the man — identified by troopers as 66-year-old Andre Siegenthaler — severely injured following the attack. Siegenthaler’s friend Ed Bullock, who had bought nails which Siegenthaler was stopping by to pick up, says the attack apparently occurred at about 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. “The bear attacked with no warning from behind a spruce tree, and even though Andre was carrying bear spray, the attack happened faster than Andre could react,” Bullock said. “Within two bounds the bear was on Andre.” Bullock gathered the information from Siegenthaler’s wife Briggita, who was with Siegenthaler after the attack occurred. According to Briggita’s account of the attack, Siegenthaler “suffered bites to his right hip area, both shoulders and arms; his left cheek was torn open, right ear mangled and nerve damage to the right cheek. Several neighbors in the area were called and came to Siegenthaler’s aid, Bullock said.

Valdez-Cordova Census Area

Valdez-Cordova Census Area

“(The Siegenthalers) live across the Slana River, so getting out to it is pretty restricted,” Bullock said. Alaska State Troopers spokesperson Beth Ipsen confirmed that the attack had occurred, but says troopers didn’t respond to the incident and have no firsthand information about what happened. “The only thing we did with it was correspond medical response,” Ipsen said. “We believe (Siegenthaler suffered) serious but non-life-threatening injuries.” – For complete article see http://www.ktuu.com/news/news/slana-man-medevaced-after-bear-attack/26665594

Hantavirus:

hantavirus1542New Mexico 06/17/14 San Juan County: Officials have confirmed that a 67-year-old female resident has died of Hantavirus, a rare disease spread by infected rodent droppings, urine and saliva. – See http://krqe.com/2014/06/17/hantavirus-claims-elderly-womans-life/

North Dakota 06/12/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials confirmed today that an adult resident from the central part of the state has died from complications related to Hantavirus. .- See http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-06-12-Hantavirus%20Death%20NR-PIO-v.FINAL.pdf

Canada:

Saskatchewan 06/24/14 swbooster.com: Health officials have confirmed the province’s first fatal case of Hantavirus in 2014 in an adult from the southern part of the province – See http://www.swbooster.com/News/Regional/2014-06-24/article-3775290/Hantavirus-death-reported-in-Southern-Saskatchewan/1

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF):

T_rmsf1 (2)California 06/25/14 Imperial County: Officials have confirmed that an unidentified resident has died of RMSF, which is a tick-borne disease. – See http://www.ivpressonline.com/news/local/local-death-attributed-to-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever/article_6dcb9fe1-bcd3-55f3-a8d0-97e9c09f3704.html

 

West Nile Virus (WNV):

thumbnailCAZ9PMJXArizona 06/14/14 Pinal County: Health officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the county, and perhaps the state, so far this year in a man from Casa Grande who is recovering. – See http://www.trivalleycentral.com/casa_grande_dispatch/area_news/pinal-co-reports-st-west-nile-case/article_38b1913e-f3ea-11e3-8bfc-001a4bcf887a.html

California 06/20/14 CA Dept of Public Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first two human cases of WNV in the state so far this year reported by Contra Costa and San Joaquin counties. The former person was hospitalized but has seen been released, and the latter tested positive but has not yet shown symptoms. – See http://www.cdph.ca.gov/Pages/NR14-058.aspx

Mississippi 06/02/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the state’s second human case of WNV so far this year. The most recent case is in Newton County. In February, a case was reported in Hinds County. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15273,341.html

Missouri 06/26/14 Laclede County: State health officials have confirmed that a 75-year-old male has died of suspected WNV. – See http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/health/first-west-nile-virus-death-reported-in-missouri/article_5ff352d8-f95a-5a5b-81ce-5db71502f9ab.html

Tennessee 06/24/14 TN Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The case involves a resident of Shelby County who is now recovering. – See https://news.tn.gov/node/12595

Rabies:

rabies.warningGeorgia 06/25/14 Wilkes County: A bobcat that attacked a pet dog in the Sandtown Road area of Washington last week has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.news-reporter.com/news/2014-06-26/Front_Page/Rabid_bobcat_killed_last_week_after_attacking_Sand.html

Georgia 06/24/14 Carroll County: A feral cat that bit an employee at Superior Industries on Columbia Drive in Carrollton on June 17th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.times-georgian.com/news/article_e29f43b0-fc11-11e3-b0fc-001a4bcf6878.html

Georgia 06/18/14 Chatham County: A feral kitten that has been in contact with a raccoon and at least six other feral cats in the Wilmington Island neighborhood has tested positive for rabies. The kitten was being fed by several residents in the Wilmington Park area.- See http://wjcl.com/2014/06/18/eight-exposed-to-rabies-on-wilmington-more-cases-expected/

Maryland 06/18/14 Frederick County: A feral cat that attacked a homeowner near Deer Crossing Elementary School in New Market on June 11th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.fredericknewspost.com/locations/local/frederick_county/frederick/cat-near-deer-crossing-elementary-tests-positive-for-rabies/article_d0e65e1c-f70f-11e3-972e-001a4bcf6878.html

New Jersey 06/25/14 Salem County: A stray cat that was taken in by an Upper Pittsgrove Township family in May has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.nj.com/south/index.ssf/2014/06/rabid_cat_bites_upper_pittsgrove_teen_say_salem_county_health_officials.html

New York 06/20/14 Onondaga County: A feral cat found near Downer Street in Van Buren has tested positive for rabies. Anyone who has been in contact with a feral cat in this vicinity, or whose outside pet might have been exposed, should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2014/06/feral_cat_in_van_buren_tests_positive_for_rabies.html

New York 06/06/14 Erie County: A sick cat found by children on the side of Cedar Road in Newstead has tested positive for rabies. – See http://wivb.com/2014/06/06/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies/

Vermont 06/23/14 Washington County: A small gray fox that attacked six people in Montpelier on June 21st has tested positive for rabies. Those bitten were in their yards in the vicinity of Derby, Colonial and Hillcrest drives. – See http://www.mychamplainvalley.com/story/d/story/fox-attacks-six-people-in-montpelier/38397/xC75qCTBlES0y41dYEQ3AQ

BOBCATS reported to be attacking DOGS in BRITISH COLUMBIA park ~ NEW MEXICO confirms HUMAN case of PLAGUE ~ HANTAVIRUS suspected in six VIRGINIA infections, two fatal ~ Notable RABIES reports from NY, NC, RI & VT.

Bobcat. Courtesy U.S. Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Land Management.

Bobcat. Courtesy U.S. Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Land Management.

Canada:

British Columbia 04/23/14 cbc.ca: Hikers in Squamish are reporting unusual and violent confrontations with bobcats around Alice Lake Provincial Park, according to WildSafeBC, a program run by the British Columbia Conservation Foundation. “It’s definitely the first time we’ve heard of numerous encounters of bobcats going for dogs,” said coordinator Meg Toom, in an interview with CBC Radio’s Rick Cluff on The Early Edition. g_vancouver9977dToom said in the nine years she’s worked in Squamish, bobcat attacks have never been an issue and that typically they eat small rodents and rabbits . . . Reports have been coming in to conservation officers of other violent bobcat encounters, and some dogs have even been left with stitches. “It’s looking like a territorial situation” said Toom. “We have more people coming into the area, more dogs off leash, and as you put more and more people into the trails network you’re going to have more encounters.” Conservation officers have posted signs in the park and have been warning hikers to beware of the animals. It remains unclear if the attacks are being carried out by a single or multiple bobcats. – For complete article, photos and map see http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bobcat-attacks-hiker-s-dogs-near-squamish-b-c-1.2618833?cmp=rss

Plague:

imag0490resizeNew Mexico 04/26/14 the globaldispatch.com: Health officials have confirmed the first case of human plague of the year in the state and in the United States in a male adult from Torrance County. Confirmatory testing is being conducted and an environmental investigation will take place at the man’s home to look for ongoing risk to others in the surrounding area. Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. It is found in animals throughout the world, most commonly rats but other rodents like ground squirrels, prairie dogs, chipmunks, rabbits and voles. Fleas typically serve as the vector of plague. Human cases have been linked to the domestic cats and dogs that brought infected fleas into the house. People can also get infected through direct contact with an infected animal, through inhalation and in the case of pneumonic plague, person to person. Yersinia pestis is treatable with antibiotics if started early enough.

There are three forms of human plague; bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic.

  • Bubonic plague: This is the most common form. In this form, the bacteria enter the body through the bite of an infected flea or rodent. Here the bacteria infect the lymphatic system. After a few days to week, the person will experience fever, chills, weakness, and swollen lymph glands. These are called buboes. In the U.S., bubonic plague is sporadic, primarily in the West. Typically, there are around 10 cases annually in this country. Untreated bubonic plague is fatal about half the time.
  • Septicemic plague: This form is also contracted from a flea or rodent bite. Sometimes it appears subsequent to untreated bubonic or pneumonic plague. It involves bloodstream dissemination to all areas of the body. Buboes do not occur. Symptoms are endotoxic shock and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Untreated septicemic plague is nearly always fatal.
  • Pneumonic plague: Probably the most serious form of plague and it’s when the bacteria infect the lungs and cause pneumonia. It is contracted when the bacteria is inhaled (primary) or develops when bubonic or septicemic plague spreads to the lungs.

Hantavirus:

hantavirus.cautionVirginia 04/25/14 Pulaski County: Two people have died and four others were hospitalized after an unidentified illness occurred in a small group including a family of five in Snowville and a close friend. Health officials suspect Hantavirus, which can be contracted from exposure to the urine or droppings of infected rodents. The family had been cleaning a long-vacated mobile home near their residence. – See http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/latest-news-ap/official-dead-hospitalized-due-to-illness/article_8371d8d8-ccca-11e3-900d-0017a43b2370.html

Rabies:

help7689New York 04/25/14 Columbia County: Health officials are searching for a person who may be been exposed to rabies by picking up a dead deer from the front yard of a Claverack home on Friday. The owner of the home on County Route 16 in Hollowville had shot and killed the deer Thursday evening after seeing it disoriented, stumbling into trees and a fence. State Department of Environmental Conservation officials were scheduled to pick up the carcass the next morning, but it was already gone. A silver pickup truck was seen around the home at the time the deer disappeared. Health officials are concerned the deer may have been infected with rabies, a neurological disease that is uniformly fatal unless treated, or another serious disease that could threaten anyone who had contact with the animal or ate its meat. Information about the whereabouts of the deer should be brought to the sheriff’s department’s attention at 828-3344. – See http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Officials-Deer-scavenger-may-face-rabies-5430348.php

North Carolina 04/25/14 Guilford County: A cat found on Alderwood Drive in Greensboro has tested positive for rabies after being in contact with a person and three other cats. http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Officials-Deer-scavenger-may-face-rabies-5430348.php. – See http://www.news-record.com/news/article_70f00602-cc8f-11e3-9be9-0017a43b2370.html

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERARhode Island 04/25/14 Providence County: A cat, believed to be a stray, that attacked a Lincoln resident in the vicinity of Lower Road has tested positive for rabies. Two other individuals were also exposed to the virus and at least two people have started post-exposure rabies treatments. The cat is described as “brown with tiger stripes” and has been seen with three other black, grey and orange tiger-striped cats also believed to be strays. Anyone who may have been in contact with these animals should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.providencejournal.com/breaking-news/content/20140425-cat-in-lincoln-tests-positive-for-rabies.ece

pitt-county-racoon-tests-positive-rabiesVermont 04/27/14 Chittenden County: A raccoon that attacked a Burlington woman in her driveway on Adams Court without provocation is still at large in the area and is thought to have rabies. The woman was taken to a local hospital where she received 14 stitches to close wounds on her leg, hands and arms. She is being treated for potential exposure to the rabies virus as a precaution. In the meantime, area residents are being cautioned. – For video and complete article see http://www.wcax.com/story/25354079/scary-raccoon-attack-ends-in-emergency-room

Six new cases of HEARTLAND VIRUS confirmed in MISSOURI and TENNESSEE ~ COYOTE/WOLF hybrid spotted in SOUTH CAROLINA ~ RABIES reports from AZ, FL, MA, NJ, NY, NC, OK, SC & TX.

Lone Star Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Lone Star Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Missouri and Tennessee 03/27/14 cdc.gov: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with health officials in Missouri and Tennessee have identified six new cases of people sick with Heartland virus: five in Missouri and one in Tennessee. The new cases, discovered in 2012 and 2013, are in addition to two discovered in 2009 and are described today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Heartland virus was first reported in two northwestern Missouri farmers who were hospitalized in 2009 with what was thought to be ehrlichiosis, a tick-borne disease. However, the patients failed to improve with treatment and testing failed to confirm ehlrlichiosis. Working with state and local partners, CDC eventually identified the cause of the men’s illness: a previously unknown virus in the phlebovirus family now dubbed Heartland virus.
CDC-LogoOngoing investigations have yielded six more cases of Heartland virus disease, bringing to eight the total number of known cases. All of the case-patients were white men over the age of 50. Their symptoms started in May to September and included fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, headache, nausea, or muscle pain. Four of the six new cases were hospitalized. One patient, who suffered from other health conditions, died. It is not known if Heartland virus was the cause of death or how much it contributed to his death. Five of the six new cases reported tick bites in the days or weeks before they fell ill. Nearly all of the newly reported cases were discovered through a study conducted by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services and CDC are actively searching for human cases at six Missouri hospitals.

 

Range of Lone Star Tick. CDC map.

Range of Lone Star Tick. CDC map.

CDC has been working closely with the Missouri and Tennessee state health departments and other federal agencies to advance understanding of Heartland virus disease by learning more about the patients who were infected, their illness and their exposure to ticks. CDC seeks to determine the symptoms and severity of the disease, where it is found, how people are being infected, and how to prevent infections. CDC studies to date have shown Heartland virus is carried by Lone Star ticks, which are primarily found in the southeastern and eastern United States. Additional studies seek to confirm whether ticks can spread the virus to people and to learn what other insects or animals may be involved in the transmission cycle. CDC is also looking for Heartland virus in other parts of the country to understand how widely it may be distributed. – For complete article including precautions see http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0327-heartland.html
Coyote/Wolf Hybrid:

coywolf-hybridSouth Carolina 03/27/14 greenvilleonline.com: by Charles Sowell – The coyote/wolf hybrid that scares deer hunters throughout South Carolina has been found at the Savannah River Site by U.S. Forestry Service personnel doing a fawn mortality rate study, officials said last week. According to Charles Ruth, with the state Department of Natural Resources, fawn mortality at the SRS was found to be 70 percent, much higher than previously thought, and of that higher rate, 80 percent was found to be caused by coyotes. That number, while higher than expected, was not nearly the surprise that a forest service study of coyote DNA that found one coyote/wolf hybrid — a coyote with Canadian grey wolf DNA, said John Kilgo, a research biologist with the forest service. “It was noticeably bigger than even the largest coyote,” he said. “So we took its DNA and a picture. We were stunned when the results came back with Canadian grey wolf in the animal’s background.”
9661542-wolf.coyote.hybrid“We don’t know how it got here,” Kilgo said. “It may have wandered down from the north, but that is not likely. More likely is that it was imported by fox hunters, or someone else who wants to use the animal for sport and then it escaped.” The hybrid animal comes from female coyotes who bred with male grey wolves in Canada and then crossed the border into the United States, said Ruth. The coyotes are also known to breed with domestic dogs. “We don’t think these animals pose any risk to humans,” said Kilgo. “And we only found one with wolf DNA out of the 500 or so animals tested, so we are treating it as an isolated incident.” – For complete article and photo see http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20140327/ENT/303270050/Coyote-wolf-hybrid-spotted-Savannah-River

Rabies:

800px-Striped_Skunkby_www.birdphotos.comWC-2Arizona 03/28/14 Santa Cruz County: Officials plan to request a quarantine situation next week after the number of animal rabies cases in the county rose to 22 this year. Another seven cases were reported in November and December of 2013. Nearly all have been infected skunks, but one case in Tubac involved a bat. Tubac has had 13 cases since November of last year, four cases were reported in Nogales, four in Sonoita, three each in Rio Rico and Patagonia, and two in Patagonia Lake Estates. – See http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/officials-sound-alarm-over-rabies-outbreak/article_fb4eadb6-b688-11e3-b1e3-001a4bcf887a.html
Racoon15642Florida 03/27/14 Hernando County: A raccoon that fought with a vaccinated dog in the Sun Hill Lane vicinity of Brooksville has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wtsp.com/story/news/local/2014/03/27/brooksville-raccoon-positive-rabies/6969033/
bobcat_ME_IFWMassachusetts 03/26/15 Worcester County: A bobcat that attacked a 35-year-old blind horse in its barn on Grove Street in Upton on March 15th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://uptondaily.com/2014/03/26/rabid-bobcat-attacks-upton-horse/
WashDFWNew Jersey 03/26/14 Morris County: A raccoon that fought with two dogs in the Belrose Court area of Long Valley on March 7th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://newjerseyhills.com/rabid-raccoon-report-in-long-valley-a-warning-to-pet/article_34f6e254-b503-11e3-8790-0019bb2963f4.html
EasternRedFox_VA_WilliamH-Majoros2New York 03/28/14 Herkimer County: A fox that attacked a man at his residence in the Newport area in the past week has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.littlefallstimes.com/article/20140328/NEWS/140329223
RaccoonDEC_NY.govNorth Carolina 03/27/14 Iredell County: A raccoon captured in the vicinity of the 400 block of East Monbo Road in Troutman has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.statesville.com/news/article_ccca6f3e-b624-11e3-a142-001a4bcf6878.html
World+News+10-1Oklahoma 03/27/14 Dewey County: A skunk that tested positive for rabies has prompted officials to issue a Rabies Alert in the county. This is the seventh case of animal rabies reported this year. – See http://www.woodwardnews.net/local/x542465783/Rabid-skunk-identified-in-Dewey-County
raccoon454 - CopySouth Carolina 03/27/14 Horry County: A person is being treated for exposure to rabies after a raccoon tested positive for the virus in the Bakers Chapel community. – See http://www.wbtw.com/story/25091210/rabies-case-investigated-in-horry-county-4th-case-this-year
thumbnailCA0KC8HVTexas 03/28/14 Wichita County: A skunk found in the southeastern part of Wichita Falls has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2014/mar/28/rabies/

 

FOLLOW-UP REPORT: NEVADA litter of PUPPIES exposes 25 people to RABIES ~ Other RABIES reports from FL, NC, VT, & VA.

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(See RABIES reports from NV posted 02/21/14)

Nevada 02/27/14 nevadaappeal.com: Authorities have found nine of the 10 puppies in a litter affected by rabies in Carson City, and at least 25 people faced potential exposure to the disease. One of the puppies tested positive for rabies, according to Carson City Health and Human Services. That agency, in cooperation with other agencies, is looking for the 10th puppy and awaits tests being conducted at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The litter originated in the Minden/Gardnerville area, and the dog that tested positive is described as a boxer mix born in November. Dogs in the litter were sold or given away, according to a news release, and because there is a “lack of verified information as to where the origin of the rabies exposure occurred, CCHHS took precautionary measures by alerting the families that owned the litter mates of their risk of rabies exposure.”

585394932Initially, two people were thought to have been exposed to the disease. Taylor Radtke, CCHHS public-information officer, said that number had grown to 25.  It is the first rabies case in the state in decades, according to CCHHS, which has cautioned that rabies is a life-threatening ailment and that people exposed should get post-exposure treatment. CCHHS staffers urged anyone with information about the 10th puppy to contact the agency at 775-887-2190. The agency says one puppy and an unvaccinated cat were exposed to the litter. Both were tested, and neither has the disease. CCHHS authorities are working with the CDC, Nevada’s Department of Agriculture, Douglas County Animal Services and Nevada’s Division of Public and Behavioral Health Office of Epidemiology on the probe.

Other Rabies reports:

Florida 02/25/14 Orange County: A Rabies Alert has been issued in Orlando after a domestic dog that was bitten by a raccoon and died tested positive for the virus. The center of the alert is in Northeast Orlando. For the alert boundaries and other information see http://www.orlandosentinel.comRaccoon-SiedePreis-sm/news/local/breakingnews/os-rabies-alert-northeast-orlando-20140225,0,7392784.story

North Carolina 02/25/14 Orange County: A raccoon killed by a vaccinated dog in the Smith Level Road area of Chapel Hill on Sunday has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wral.com/raccoon-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-orange-county/13427388/

thumbnailCA6WGA0CVermont 02/26/14 Rutland County: A bobcat that attacked two domestic cats, and possibly four, on Cold River Road in Clarendon has tested positive for rabies. The bobcat was shot by a local resident after the altercation with the pet cats, but two of the cats ran off and it isn’t known if they were injured or had contact with the bobcat. – See http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20140226/THISJUSTIN/702269883

article-1277106566013-09EE76B9000005DC-717773_223x335Virginia 02/28/14 York County: A fox found near Montague Court in the Queens Lake subdivision has tested positive for rabies. – See http://wydaily.com/2014/02/28/rabid-fox-found-in-queens-lake/

WEST NILE VIRUS kills 27 BALD EAGLES in UTAH ~ COLORADO town warns residents of MOUNTAIN LIONS ~ CHIKUNGUNYA in the CARIBBEAN poses threat to U.S. ~ Vets say research needed on LYME DISEASE in HORSES ~ RABIES reports from FLx2, & VA.

Bald Eagle. Bing free use license.

Bald Eagle. Bing free use license.

Utah 12/31/13 ctvnews.ca: by Michelle L. Price – The mystery illness that has killed 27 bald eagles in Utah this month appears to be West Nile Virus, state officials said Tuesday. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources said in a statement that laboratory tests done on some of the first birds found indicate they died from West Nile Virus. Since Dec. 1, officials have found the birds in northern and central Utah. All were either dead or were ill and later died during treatment. The eagles displayed similar symptoms, including head tremors, signs of seizures, weakness in legs and feet and a paralysis of the bird’s wings. Beyond the 27 that have died, officials said five eagles were being treated at a wildlife rehabilitation centre Tuesday. They appeared to be responding well to treatment, officials said. Utah wildlife officials aren’t sure how the eagles caught the virus, but they suspect the birds contracted it by eating Eared Grebes that were infected with the virus and died recently.

Eared Grebe.

Eared Grebe.

West Nile Virus, which is spread by mosquitoes, usually infects eagles and other birds during warmer months. Mark Hadley, a Utah Division of Wildlife Resources spokesman, said the grebes, a duck-like aquatic bird, start arriving in Utah in October, when mosquitoes are still active. “It’s possible that those grebes got bit by mosquitoes after they got here when they arrived in the fall, and it just took a while for them to die.” The bald eagles began arriving in November and appeared to have died relatively quickly once they contracted the virus, Hadley said. About 750 to 1,200 bald eagles begin migrating to Utah each November and stay until March, officials said. During those winter months, the eagles get most of their food by eating dead animals, such as grebes.

Flock of Bald eaglesLeslie McFarlane, a wildlife disease coordinator with DWR, said in a statement that there’s still a chance a few more eagles could die, but because the migration period for grebes is almost over, it’s likely that the risk to eagles will soon drop. The birds do not pose a risk to human health but people should not handle eagles if they find them, wildlife officials said. Hadley said that in the 17 years he’s been with DWR, he has never seen this many eagles die off, particularly in such a short period of time. – See http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/west-nile-virus-caused-27-bald-eagle-deaths-in-december-utah-wildlife-officials-1.1613441

Mountain Lions:

s_mountain-lion-0002Colorado 12/27/13 Douglas County: The town of Parker may be 20 miles from the foothills, but officials sent an e-mail to residents on Thursday warning that mountain lions have been sighted inside the town limits. It cautioned residents not to walk or hike alone, and to make sure children are within sight at all times. – For additional advice see http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/parker-issues-warning-after-mountain-lions-spotted

Chikungunya:

Follow-Up Report:

(See CHIKUNGUNYA virus spreads in the AMERICAS posted 12/15/13)

pic_chikungunyaCaribbean Islands 12/30/13 cidrap.umn.edu: by Lisa Schnirring – Health officials are reporting a sharp rise in the number of patients sickened in a chikungunya fever outbreak centered on the Caribbean island of St. Martin, which may signal an increasing risk to the US mainland. On the French part of the island, where most of the infections have been reported, the number of confirmed cases has risen from 26 to 66, according to a Dec 28 update from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). In addition, health officials from the Netherlands have confirmed the first case on the Dutch side of St. Martin (Sint Maarten), and illnesses have been detected on two other nearby islands: three on Martinique and one on Guadeloupe, according to the ECDC report. Both of those islands are south and slightly east of St. Martin. The case in Guadeloupe represents the island’s first documented local chikungunya case, which was detected because of enhanced surveillance for the disease in all French Caribbean territories, the ECDC said. The patient is co-infected with dengue serotype 4 and had not recently traveled to another area where chikungunya exists. Meanwhile, health officials in the area are investigating a slew of suspected and probable cases. They include 167 suspected cases and 14 probable cases on the French side of St. Martin, and two patients have been hospitalized. Martinique has 27 suspected cases, and on the island of St. Barthelemy, 21 suspected cases are under investigation. The outbreak represents the first known indigenous transmission of chikungunya fever in the Americas. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2013/12/caribbean-chikungunya-outbreak-grows-poses-threat-us

Lyme Disease:

aaep_logoNational 12/30/13 thehorse.com: by Amy Johnson, DVM – It is hard to get a roomful of people to agree on anything, but just about every veterinarian attending the Lyme disease table topic session at the 2013 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Dec. 7-11 in Nashville, Tenn., agreed that more research is needed on this disease in horses. We do know that Lyme disease is an increasingly recognized problem in people living in areas where the causative organism, Borrelia burgdorferi, is endemic. These areas include the northeast and north-central United States. We also know that Borrelia is capable of infecting horses. Despite only a handful of published case reports describing clinical signs in infected horses, many practitioners in endemic areas are convinced that they see cases of Lyme disease in horses. The most common signs in these cases are behavior changes, lethargy or poor attitude, and change in gait/lameness. Uveitis (inflammation within the eye) and neuroborreliosis (neurologic disease due to Lyme disease) are occasionally seen as well. So if a horse is showing possible signs of Lyme disease, how can it be diagnosed? vetSeveral blood tests are available that will identify antibodies against Borrelia. The presence of antibodies (in an unvaccinated horse) indicates that the horse has been infected with Borrelia at some point in its life. The pattern of antibody production might help to ascertain whether infection is acute or chronic. However, more research is needed regarding patterns of antibody production in infected horses. – For complete article see http://www.thehorse.com/articles/33123/aaep-researchers-discuss-lyme-disease-in-horses

Rabies:

thumbnailCA6WGA0CFlorida 12/31/13 Hamilton County: A bobcat that attacked a dog in Jennings has tested positive for rabies. A Rabies Alert has been issued within the boundaries of CR 141 North, CR 143 North, and CR 146. – See http://www.suwanneedemocrat.com/jasper/x1956145775/Health-officials-in-Hamilton-County-issue-rabies-alert

10975940 - CopyFlorida 12/30/13 Palm Beach County: Two raccoons that attacked dogs in West Palm Beach and Jupiter Farms last week have tested positive for rabies. And a third raccoon that attacked a dog near A1A in Tequesta over the weekend is presumed rabid. – See http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/two-raccoons-that-attacked-dogs-in-west-palm-beach/ncYDM/

337278_koshka_kot_rebenok_ditya_devochka_kosichka_ulybka_2990x2170_(www.GdeFon.ru)Virginia 12/30/13 Prince William County: A domestic cat that appeared to be injured was picked up near Powells Landing Circle in Woodbridge on December 20th and has since tested positive for rabies. – See http://manassas.patch.com/groups/police-and-fire/p/cat-with-rabies-found-in-prince-william-county