Tag Archives: Feral Cats

RACCOON on VIRGINIA’s Chincoteague Island has exposed at least one at-large FERAL CAT to RABIES ~ Other RABIES reports from CA, CO, DE, FL, GA(2), KS, MD, MT, TX(2), & VA ~ Scientist in ENGLAND says MALARIA PARASITE has developed resistance to the best drugs ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending April 21, 2012.

Raccoon. Courtesy of U.S. Army.

Virginia 04/26/12 Chincoteague Island, Accomack County: A raccoon seen fighting with a feral cat in the Deep Hole Road area has tested positive for rabies. The cat escaped. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20120426/CB01/204260301

California 04/26/12 Laguna Niguel, Orange County: A California Brown bat found on La Paz Road in Laguna Niguel Regional Park  on Sunday has tested positive for rabies. “The bat was found dead by a park ranger on a park pathway and reported to O.C. Animal Care. No one was observed near the bat, but we are asking anyone who had any contact with the bat to contact HCA Epidemiology to assess for risk of exposure,” said Deanne Thompson, spokesperson for the Orange County Health Care Agency. In California most cases of rabies occur in skunks and bats. Last year in Orange County 11 bats tested positive for rabies. This is the second bat to test positive for rabies this year in the county, she said. Anyone who had recent contact with a bat in the vicinity of Laguna Niguel Regional Park is asked to call the Orange County Health Care Agency Epidemiology at (714) 834-8180 so that a nurse can evaluate the risk for rabies. – See http://lagunaniguel.patch.com/articles/bat-found-at-l-n-regional-park-tests-positive-for-rabies#photo-6799187

Colorado 04/27/12 Pueblo, Pueblo County: Public health officials announced that rabies has spread to a third animal species in Pueblo. A rabid fox was found near 29th Lane and Preston Road on the Mesa April 26th, and another rabid skunk was found near W. 20th Street and Tuxedo Boulevard in the Hyde Park vicinity the same day. Raccoons are also known carriers in the county. – See http://www.krdo.com/news/30969409/detail.html

Delaware 04/27/12 Sussex County: Two raccoons that were in contact with residents’ dogs in separate incidents, one in Frankford and another in Frederica, have both tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20120427/DW01/120427014/SUSSEX-Rabies-recently-confirmed-raccoons-Frederica-Frankford?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|Delaware%20Wave

Florida 04/27/12 Ocala, Marion County: Health officials have issued a rabies alert for an area centered at County Road 316 and Northwest 100th Avenue Road after a bat tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.ocala.com/article/20120427/ARTICLES/120429748/1001/NEWS01?Title=Rabid-bat-found-in-northwest-area-of-county

Georgia 04/27/12 Gainesville, Hall County: A raccoon that came into contact with a dog at Lula and Skitts Mountain roads has tested positive for rabies. This is the 12th case of animal rabies in the county this year. – See http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=248032

Georgia 04/27/12 Dalton, Whitfield County: A dead raccoon that was retrieved from the garage of a LaVista Road residence has tested positive for rabies. This is the first case of animal rabies reported in the county this year. – See http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/17858296/whitfield-county-raccoon-tests-positive-for-rabies

Kansas 04/28/12 El Dorado, Butler County: A horse that has tested positive for rabies is the first case of the virus presented in the county this year. – See http://www.eldoradotimes.com/topstories/x272271971/Butler-County-horse-tests-positive-for-rabies

Maryland 04/27/12 Huntingtown, Calvert County: A calico feral cat captured near Mill Branch and Smoky roads on April 12 has tested positive for rabies. The cat was part of a group of feral cats that roam freely in that area and have been known to inhabit barns. An area resident said he heard animals fighting in his barn and when he investigated the cat “charged him” so he shot the animal. It is very likely that other wild animals in the area, including feral cats, have been exposed to the virus. – See http://www.somdnews.com/article/20120427/NEWS/704279903/1057/rabid-cat-found-in-huntingtown&template=southernMaryland

Montana 04/26/12 Carter County: In accordance with state law, the Montana Department of Livestock has placed the county under a rabies quarantine after a puppy tested positive for the virus. – See http://liv.mt.gov/news/2012/20120426_cartercountyrabiesq.mcpx

Texas 04/27/12 Round Rock, Travis & Williamson counties: A dead bat found on the sidewalk on Main Street about 1 p.m. on April 26th has tested positive for rabies. Seek medical advice if you or your pet may have had contact with the bat. – See http://www.statesman.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/austin/williamson/entries/2012/04/27/rabid_bat_discovered_in_round.html

Texas 04/28/12 Brenham, Washington County: A dead skunk found in the 2000 block of Geney Street inside the city limits on April 25th has tested positive for rabies. This is the 7th confirmed case of the virus in the county this year. – See http://www.brenhambanner.com/news/seventh-case-of-rabies-is-confirmed/article_4030dcf6-913d-11e1-a8aa-0019bb2963f4.html

Virginia 04/27/12 Hampton: A raccoon that attacked a family dog in the Northampton area earlier this week has tested positive for rabies. This is the second case of animal rabies in the city this year. – See http://www.dailypress.com/news/breaking/dp-nws-raccoon-rabies,0,5805428.story

Global 04/27/12 planetsave.com: by Nathan – New mutations in the deadliest malaria parasite have given it resistance to the most powerful antimalarial drugs available. The researchers that did the study say that this should serve as a warning, that the best weapons against malaria may become ineffective. The parasite has developed resistance to artemether, one of the two most effective of the artemisinin group of drugs. They are the most effective and widely used drugs to combat malaria. The study was done by a team at the University of London. They discovered artemether resistance in 11 out of 28 parasite samples, taken from patients who got it traveling abroad, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. 90 percent of the one million deaths that are caused by malaria every year, are in sub-Saharan Africa. “Artemether and ACTs are still very effective, but this study confirms our fears of how the parasite is mutating to develop resistance. Drug resistance could eventually become a devastating problem in Africa, and not just in southeast Asia where most of the world is watching for resistance. Effective alternative treatments are currently unaffordable for most suffering from malaria. Finding new drugs is, therefore, crucial,” lead researcher Sanjeev Krishna is quoted as saying. All 11 resistant parasites contained the same mutation, but the resistance was strongest in the parasites that also contained another separate mutation.

Female Anopheles gambiae mosquito feeding. Malaria vector. Courtesy CDC.

Professor Krishna says: “At the moment, we do not know if the other artemisinins will follow suit, but given the shared chemistry they have with artemether it is tempting to think that they would.” He also said that the resistance could be caused by the increased use of the drug — 300 million doses were used worldwide in 2011. Greater use gives more opportunity for advantageous mutation. This will lead to a repeat of the resistance that malaria developed to chloroquine. “New drug development is paramount, but it is vital that we also learn more about how artemisinins work so we can tailor ACT treatments to be effective for as long as possible,” Profesor Krishna says. Malaria is predicted to spread far outside of its current range as climate change progresses, enabled by the increasing heat and precipitation. Without effective treatment it will affect far more people than it currently does.

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending April 21, 2012:

Published April 27, 2012/ 61(16); ND-213-ND-226

Anaplasmosis . . . 6 . . . Maine (2), New York (3), Rhode Island,

Ehrlichiosis . . . 2 . . . Maryland, New York,

Giardiasis . . . 73 . . . Alabama, Alaska (2), Arizona, Arkansas (2), Connecticut, Idaho (3), Iowa (2), Maryland (3), Massachusetts (3), Michigan, Missouri (2), Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York (21), Ohio (9), Oregon (3), Pennsylvania (5), South Carolina, Vermont, Washington (6), Wisconsin (3),

Hantavirus . . . 1 . . . Montana,

Lyme Disease . . .  172. . .  Delaware (5), Maryland (44), New Jersey (60), New York (25), Ohio, Pennsylvania (30), Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia (5),

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 1 . . . New York,

Rabies (Animal) . . . 41. . . Alabama, Illinois, Maine, Maryland (7), Michigan, Missouri, New York (11), Texas (15), Vermont, West Virginia (2),

Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 13 . . . Alabama, Maryland, Missouri (3), Tennessee (4), Virginia (4).

CALIFORNIA preparing for TIGER MOSQUITO that carries DENGUE and other VIRUSES ~ EUROPEAN climate change favors MOSQUITO that carries DENGUE and other VIRUSES ~ TENNESSEE TICK season is early and ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER cases are up over 500% ~ FDA says CALIFORNIA case of MAD COW DISEASE under control ~ RABIES reports from FLORIDA(2), MASSACHUSETTS, NEW JERSEY, OKLAHOMA, & VIRGINIA.

Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopicts, beginning its blood-meal. Courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

California 04/25/12 peninsulapress.com: by Jessica Parks – Santa Clara County is urging residents to be on the lookout for an exotic, bloodthirsty tiger with a potentially lethal bite.  It was last seen in Los Angeles County on Dec. 28. Asian tiger mosquitoes are a much smaller threat than jungle cats and haven’t been linked to any human illnesses in California.  But officials aren’t taking any chances.  Once the species becomes established, it is very difficult to eradicate and can spread diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever and encephalitis. The county is launching a public education campaign, asking residents to “be our eyes and ears,” said vector control chief Russ Parman, who will oversee the effort. The tiger mosquito is easily distinguished from common local species, due to its distinctive black body with white stripes and aggressive biting during daylight hours.  Parman’s office is also laying simple water traps across the county and using helicopters to locate stagnant pools of water where mosquitoes might be breeding.

The best way to eradicate invasive pests is to catch them early, before they can reproduce and branch out.  In early September, officials in Southern California began getting calls about strange-looking, day-biting mosquitoes east of downtown Los Angeles.  They went door-to-door and sprayed to suppress the insects, but “there were quite a few of them out there” and it’s impossible to know whether any larvae survived, said Kelly Middleton, a spokeswoman for the San Gabriel Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District. With warm weather following recent rains, spring is a prime time for the invasive pest to reappear. – For complete article see http://peninsulapress.com/2012/04/25/invasive-mosquito-bites-like-a-tiger-looks-like-a-zebra/

Europe 04/25/12 iol.co.za: by SAPA – The climate in north-west Europe and the Balkans is becoming suitable for the Asian tiger mosquito, a disease-spreading invasive species, scientists said on Wednesday. The warning comes from scientists at the University of Liverpool, north-west England, who say the two regions have been having progressively milder winters and warmer summers. These temperate conditions favour the mosquito, which gained a foothold in Albania in 1979 and is now present in more than 15 countries on Europe’s southern rim. “Over the last two decades, climate conditions have become more suitable over central northwestern Europe – Benelux, western Germany – and the Balkans,” they said. At the same time, drier conditions in southern Spain have made that region less welcoming for the insect, they said.

Hemorrhagic Dengue Fever Victim.

The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), a native of tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia, can transmit viruses that cause West Nile fever, yellow fever, dengue, St. Louis and Japanese encephalitis and other diseases. In 2005-6, it caused an epidemic of chikungunya, a disease that attacks the joints, on the French Indian Ocean island of Reunion. A year later, it unleashed an outbreak of chikungunya in the Italian province of Ravenna. In 2010, it was fingered as a transmitter of dengue virus in France and Croatia. As of last December, the mosquito was present in more than 15 countries, from southern Spain to parts of Greece and Turkey, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

Reporting in Britain’s Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the Liverpool team looked at European weather records for 1950-2009 and ran a widely-used computer model to simulate weather trends for 2030-2050. “Similar trends are likely in the future with an increased risk simulated over northern Europe and slightly decreased risk over southern Europe,” says the study. “These distribution shifts are related to wetter and warmer conditions favouring the overwintering of A. albopictus in the north, and drier and warmer summers that might limit its southward expansion.” The paper points out that weather alone does not mean the species will automatically spread there. It also notes that the study did not consider vegetation or soil types which also determine whether the mosquito would be able to breed there. In addition, cold snaps or hot, dry spells also help limit mosquito survival, and these too were not included in the investigation. In the mid-1960s, the Asian tiger mosquito was limited to some parts of Asia, India and a handful of Pacific islands. It has since spread to North and South America, the Caribbean, Africa and the Middle East, as well as Europe, mainly by hitchhiking a ride in exported materials.

Tennessee 04/26/12 tn.gov: News Release – The Tennessee Department of Health is seeing significant increases in tick-borne illnesses this year following an unusually mild winter and spring. Cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are up 533 percent compared to this time last year, according to Abelardo Moncayo, Ph.D., with the TDH Division of Communicable and Environmental Diseases and Emergency Preparedness. “We’ve documented 38 cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, compared with only six by the same time last year,” Moncayo said. “We are also seeing increased numbers of other tick-borne infections compared to last year. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most serious tick-borne disease in the United States. Symptoms usually appear two to 14 days after a bite from an infected tick.

Petechial rash.

The disease often begins with sudden onset of fever and headache. Early symptoms may resemble other diseases and include nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, lack of appetite and severe headache. Later symptoms may include rash, abdominal pain, joint pain and diarrhea. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious illness that can be fatal if not treated correctly, even in previously healthy people. It and other tick-borne illnesses can have devastating effects, but are effectively treated with antibiotics. Persons with symptoms should see their medical provider for early diagnosis and treatment. – For tips on preventing tick bites see http://news.tn.gov/node/8734

California 04/26/12 fda.gov: News Release – This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed that a dairy cow in California tested positive for atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or “mad cow” disease). The USDA also confirmed the cow did not enter the animal feed or human food supply. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is working with federal and state authorities to further investigate this case. The FDA is confident in the effectiveness of the existing animal feed safeguards designed to prevent the spread of BSE through feed. Although current science suggests that atypical cases of BSE, such as this one, are unlikely to be transmitted through animal feed, the FDA will work with the USDA to complete a thorough epidemiological investigation. Importantly, scientific research indicates that BSE cannot be transmitted in cow’s milk. – For more information see USDA’s Chief Veterinary Officer on the Recent BSE Case (aka Mad Cow)

Florida 04/25/12 North Fort Myers, Lee County: A horse that died from rabies last week presented the first confirmed case of the virus in the county in two years. – See http://www.nbc-2.com/story/17771201/rabies-case-discovered-in-lee-county

Florida 04/25/12 Merritt Island, Brevard County: A pet cat located at Banana River Drive that bit it’s owner has tested positive for rabies. It is most likely the cat contracted the disease from wild animal infected with the virus. – See http://cmacdonald.brevardtimes.com/2012/04/rabies-positive-cat-reported-on-merritt.html

Massachusetts 04/25/12 Wayland, Middlesex County: A raccoon found off Concord and Lincoln roads in North Wayland has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/newsnow/x1783291258/Raccoon-found-in-North-Wayland-tests-positive-for-rabies

New Jersey 04/25/12 New Milford, Bergen County: A raccoon that attacked a man near his Pine Street home last Friday has tested positive for rabies. The man was bitten on an arm and a leg. – See http://newmilford-nj.patch.com/articles/raccoon-that-attacked-man-on-pine-street-confirmed-rabid

Oklahoma 04/25/12 Shawnee, Pottawatomie County: In little more than a week Unity Health Center staff have seen 10 patients with possible rabies exposure, Kari Gilliam, a pharmacist at Unity, said. From January to March 31 there have been 21 cases of rabies statewide; there were 60 total in 2011. Seventy percent of the rabies cases are found in skunks, and then cattle, dogs, cats, horses and bats. – For complete article see http://www.news-star.com/news/x1783289868/Unity-has-seen-10-patients-with-possible-rabies-exposure

Virginia 04/25/12 Virginia Beach: A raccoon that bit a mechanic on the arm and shoulder while he was working under a truck was captured by Animal Control and has tested positive for rabies. The mechanic tried to escape but the raccoon jumped on his back and bit him several times. Officers believe someone is feeding feral cats in the area and the food has attracted raccoons. It’s possible that the feral cats have also been exposed to the virus. The incident occurred near Butternut Lane. – See http://www.wavy.com/dpp/news/local_news/va_beach/vb-man-bitten-by-rabid-raccoon

LOUISIANA townspeople post “COYOTE ATTACK AREA” signs to alert neighbors ~ RABIES reports from FLORIDA, MARYLAND, NORTH DAKOTA, PENNSYLVANIA, & VIRGINIA ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending April 14, 2012 ~ TRAVEL REPORTS: CDC warns of LASSA FEVER in NIGERIA.

Coyote. Photo by Santa Clara County, California.

Louisiana 04/24/12 Harahan, Jefferson Parish: Local police have resumed nighttime coyote hunts after pet owners reported cats and dogs were either missing or had been mutilated. John Leslie, a wildlife biologist with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, blamed the increasing number of sightings on the animals’ good parenting. – See http://www.nola.com/pets/index.ssf/2012/04/coyotes_again_mauling_cats_in.html

Florida 04/24/12 Suwannee County: A rabies alert has been issued after a raccoon found in the vicinity of U.S. 90W and West Tower Road tested positive for rabies. – See http://suwanneedemocrat.com/local/x1521922374/Rabies-alert-issued-in-western-Suwannee-County

Maryland 04/24/12 Port Deposit, Cecil County: A feral cat that scratched at least five people on Main Street last Friday has tested positive for rabies. The cat is described as a small-to-medium sized yellow tabby cat that looked sickly and had abscesses on its body. – See http://www.abc2news.com/dpp/news/region/cecil_county/rabid-cat-scratches-5-people-in-cecil-county

North Dakota 04/24/12 jamestownsun.com: A mild winter and spring have led to a spike in rabies cases in North Dakota. State officials are urging pet and livestock owners to make sure their animals are vaccinated against the deadly virus. There have been 40 confirmed rabies cases so far this year –  double the 20 cases in all of 2011, Deputy State Veterinarian Beth Carlson said. The disease has been found in cattle, horses, sheep, cats, bats and skunks this year. Skunks are the main carrier, however, spreading the disease by biting other animals. – For complete article see http://www.jamestownsun.com/event/apArticle/id/D9UBCEOO3/

Pennsylvania o4/24/12 Upper Darby, Delaware County: A teenage girl is receiving post-exposure rabies treatments after waking in the night to find a raccoon biting her leg. The incident occurred in the 100-block of Summit Avenue, unfortunately the raccoon escaped and has not been found. – See http://www.myfoxphilly.com/dpp/news/local_news/teenager-attacked-by-raccoon-in-her-bedroom

Virginia 04/23/12 Williamsburg: Health officials have issued a rabies alert after a fox attacked a Heritage Humane Society dog while it was being walked by a technician earlier this week. The dog received minor injuries and the fox, which is presumed to be rabid, returned to the woods and has not been found. – See http://www.vagazette.com/articles/2012/04/23/news/doc4f9592a25f841086277449.txt

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending April 14, 2012:

Published April 20, 2012/ 61(15); ND-198-ND-212

Anaplasmosis . . . 3 . . . New York, Rhode Island (2),

Babesiosis . . . 1 . . . New York,

Brucellosis . . . 2 . . . Florida (2), 

Ehrlichiosis . . . 3 . . . Florida, Missouri, Texas,

Giardiasis . . . 78 . . . Alabama, Florida (19), Iowa, Maryland (2), Michigan (7), New York (22), Ohio (9), Oregon (3), Pennsylvania (5), Washington (7), Wisconsin (2),

Lyme Disease . . .  93. . .  Florida (3), Maine, Maryland (2), Michigan (2), New Jersey (37), New York (28), Pennsylvania (17), Virginia (3),

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 1 . . . New York,

Rabies (Animal) . . . 16. . . Alabama, Arkansas (6), Maine, Maryland (4), New York (2), Texas, West Virginia,

Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 11 . . . Alabama, Colorado, Missouri (7), New York, Tennessee,

Tularemia . . . 1 . . . Maryland.

Travel Warnings:

Nigeria 04/25/12 cdc.com: Travelers’ Health News Release – The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health has reported an increased number of cases of Lassa fever. Nineteen of the country’s 36 states have reported cases since the beginning of 2012. As of April 13, 2012, there were reports of 818 suspected cases, including 84 deaths. At this time, 131 cases have been confirmed by laboratory testing. Seven deaths have also been reported among health care workers.  Cases have occurred in the states of Edo, Bauchi, Plateau and Taraba. The number of reported cases of Lassa fever in Nigeria is greater this year than in previous years. However, cases in previous years could have been underestimated due to the lack of laboratory and disease investigation systems. Lassa fever is a viral illness that is spread by rats. People get the disease through direct contact with rat droppings or urine and through touching objects or eating food contaminated with rat droppings or urine. Lassa fever may also spread though person-to-person contact. For advice on how travelers can protect themselves see http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/in-the-news/lassa-fever-in-nigeria.htm

OREGON Fish and Wildlife begins hazing CORMORANTS to improve SALMON SMOLTS survival rate ~ CANADA: ONTARIO’s provincial capital of Toronto reports MAN diagnosed with RABIES ~ Other RABIES reports from NEW YORK, NORTH CAROLINA, TENNESSEE, & VIRGINIA (2).

Double crested cormorant. Photo by Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife.

Oregon 04/17/12 or.us: News Release – With hundreds of thousands of young salmon now making their way toward the ocean, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is ramping up efforts to make sure they get there and aren’t picked off by hungry birds along the way. For the next month and a half, volunteers assisting ODFW staff will haze cormorants to keep them from feasting on salmon smolts as the young fish run the gauntlet through five coastal estuaries on their way to the Pacific Ocean. Cormorants are large seabirds that inhabit Oregon’s estuaries during the spring and summer. They are voracious eaters and can consume up to two pounds of fish per day … roughly the equivalent of about 12 salmon smolts when the fish are released as juveniles from ODFW’s hatcheries at Tillamook, Nehalem, Hebo, Alsea and Coquille.

Salmon smolt

Cormorants have been identified by sportsmen’s groups and others as a potential threat the outbound migration of salmon and steelhead. Members of those organizations are assisting in the hazing program by providing manpower and equipment needed for daily hazing chores while ODFW provides fuel and oversight. Hazing generally consists of a person in a small boat interrupting the birds’ feeding patterns by driving toward them while they are in the water foraging for fish. At times, pyrotechnics are used to scare the birds away. “Cormorants will eat what’s most abundant,” said Lindsay Adrean, ODFW’s avian predation coordinator. “The idea is to move the cormorants towards the lower estuary and ocean where they will have many other kinds of fish to choose from.

Salmon smolts. Photo by Cacophony. Wikimedia Commons.

This also provides the salmon with extra time to disperse, making them less vulnerable to predation.” Volunteers will be working in Tillamook and Alsea bays and mouths of the Nehalem, Nestucca and Coquille rivers through the end of May. Manpower is being provided by the Port of Nehalem, Port of Bandon, North Coast Salmon and Steelhead Enhancement Fund, and Alsea Sportsmen’s Association.

Cormorants. Photo by Danielle Langlois. Wikimedia Commons.

In addition to improving salmon out-migration the hazing project will help ODFW gather baseline information about cormorant population trends and the effectiveness of hazing. It’s a tricky proposition, according to Adrean, because cormorants are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, so extra care must be used to ensure the birds are not injured or killed. At the same time, cormorant populations have been increasing on East Sand Island near the mouth of the Columbia River. Population surveys indicate there are about 2,300 cormorant breeding pairs in the estuaries between Tillamook Bay and the Rogue River, and 12,000 breeding pairs on East Sand Island. Researchers want to know how future changes in the distribution of cormorants might impact coastal salmon populations. “We hear a lot from people who think cormorants are having an impact, so that’s what we’re working on,” said Adrean. “We’re trying to find the right balance. That’s the key.”

CANADA:

ONTARIO 04/16/12 cbc.com: – A Toronto man is being treated for the first case of rabies in a human in the city in more than 80 years, CBC News has learned. The 41-year-old man had been working as a bartender in the Dominican Republic for four months. He had already reported symptoms at the end of last month in the Dominican Republic where he was seen three times at a resort clinic. His condition worsened to the point that he was having trouble swallowing and was afraid of food, water and even the air. He returned to Toronto a week ago by airplane. He was taken to hospital by police after behaving erratically at the airport. His symptoms worsened by April 11, and on April 12, samples were sent for testing. It was then determined he had rabies, a virus that attacks the brain and nervous system. Dr. Donald Low, the medical director of the public health laboratories at the arms-length government agency Public Health Ontario, said rabies in humans is rare.

The last case of rabies in a human in Ontario was an Ottawa valley girl in 1967. The last case in Toronto occurred in 1931 when a three-year-old girl contracted the virus. There have only been three cases of human rabies in Canada in the last 12 years. All of those people were bitten by infected bats. “There’s a good chance if you grow the virus, which is in the process of being done, you can fingerprint the virus,” said Low. “It can give you a clue as to where it might have come from — whether it came from a bat, whether it came from a skunk or a dog and also … there might be some evidence there to be able to say in hindsight that it came from an area similar to the Dominican Republic.”

The infected Toronto man is being treated in the neurological intensive care unit at Toronto Western Hospital. Human-to-human transmission of rabies is extremely rare, Low said, but the man’s family members are being treated with vaccines. Most people who show symptoms of rabies don’t survive. Those who do usually suffer severe neurological damage. Humans can be vaccinated against rabies before exposure to the virus. They are also vaccinated after contact, although immunization is recommended as soon as possible after exposure.

New York 04/16/12 northcountrynow.com: Potsdam, St. Lawrence County – Clarkson University Campus Safety and Security wants to find the owner of a dog that bit a woman Sunday at about 12:20 p.m. near the playing field on Clarkson Avenue so that they can confirm the dog’s vaccinations. The dog was white with black markings and a square nose (possibly a pit bull or pit bull mix), on a chain leash, walked by a man in his 20s. If the dog’s vaccinations cannot be confirmed, the person bitten will need to undergo a series a rabies shots. Call 268-6666 if you can assist in finding the dog or its owner.

North Carolina 04/16/12 Newton, Catawba County: Health officials have confirmed the county’s fourth case of rabies this year after two dogs fought with a raccoon that has tested positive for the virus. Two people were exposed to the dogs, which are now under quarantine. – See http://www.wbtv.com/story/17463542/dogs-fight-with-raccoon-later-diagnosed-with-rabies-in-catawba-co

Tennessee 04/16/12 Harrison Ferry Mountain, Warren County: A colony of about 50 feral cats has taken over a recycling center creating a potential health hazard and particular concern about aggressive cats and rabies. – See http://www.newschannel5.com/story/17465501/colony-of-feral-cats-takes-over-recycling-center

Virginia 04/16/12 Newport News & James City County: The Peninsula Health District says raccoons found near Mt. Pleasant Drive in James City County and Dean Ray Court in Newport News have tested positive for rabies. Those with information regarding exposure are urged to contact the agency at 253-4813. – See http://wydaily.com/local-news/8829-rabid-raccoon-found-near-mt-pleasant-drive.html

Virginia 04/16/12 Greensprings, James City County: The Peninsula Health District is looking for a short-haired, black and gray tabby cat that bit a person on April 13 near Braemar Creek at Greensprings in James City County. If the cat is not found, the victim may have to receive rabies prevention shots. Once found, the cat will not be taken away from its owner, according to the Williamsburg Area Environmental Health Office. It will be placed on an in-home confinement period of 10 days, however. Anyone who has seen an animal fitting the description in that area is asked to contact the Williamsburg Area Environmental Health Office at 253-4813. After hours, call James City County Animal Control at 565-0730. The Health District recommends residents report all exposures, enjoy wildlife from a distance and make sure family pets are vaccinated and protected against the rabies virus. State law requires that dogs and cats be vaccinated between three and four months of age.

CALIFORNIA’s Griffith Park in LA scene of MOUNTAIN LION capture ~ SOUTHEASTERN states should consider COYOTES new players in DEER management ~ RABIES reports from CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, & VIRGINIA.

Mountain Lion. Courtesy National Park Service.

California 04/09/12 nps.gov: News Release – Biologists from Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) captured a mountain lion in the Griffith Park area on March 28. After outfitting the lion with a GPS collar, recording measurements and collecting blood and tissue samples, biologists released the animal at the capture site. According to Wildlife Ecologist Seth Riley, an expert on urban wildlife with the National Park Service, it is significant for such a large carnivore to be discovered in an area so surrounded by urbanization. “It’s a testament to the health of the natural systems in the L.A. area, including Griffith Park, that the full complement of wildlife can persist here. It will be very interesting to see where this animal goes and how long he stays there.” Named P-22 (for Puma 22), the lion is male and approximately three years old. Scientists with the Griffith Park Wildlife Connectivity Study, conducted by Cooper Ecological Monitoring, Inc. and the U.S. Geological Survey, first spotted the lion on remotely triggered wildlife cameras in early March. The photos were the first known images of mountain lion activity east of Cahuenga Pass and within the Santa Monica Mountains eco-region.

Hollywood sign Mount Lee Griffith Park Los Angeles

Scientists with the Griffith Park Wildlife Connectivity Study alerted the mountain lion specialists at SMMNRA, part of the National Park Service, who captured the lion after nine days of trapping. P-22′s DNA will be analyzed at UCLA and UC Davis to provide information about where the mountain lion came from and how he might be related to other lions in the region. As part of a decade-long study, SMMNRA is currently tracking five mountain lions, from Point Mugu in the west, Los Padres National Forest in the north, to Griffith Park in the east. The goal of the study is to understand how mountain lions survive in such a fragmented, urban landscape and how best to conserve them. Mountain lions require ample acreage to find mates and sufficient food, often with “home ranges” of up to 250 square miles. Because Griffith Park is only a fraction of that size, scientists do not expect P-22 to stay in the park for an extended period of time.

Southeastern States 04/15/12 al.com: by Jeff Dute – Through its highly adaptable and predatory nature, the coyote appears to be inserting itself as a new player in future deer management strategies across the Southeast. Results from numerous recent studies across the region highlighted at this year’s Southeast Deer Study Group [PDF] meeting have shown that in localized instances, coyote predation on whitetail fawns is much higher than ever seen in the region. The question still remaining, according to wildlife biologists, is whether those impacts exist across all Southeastern landscapes to the point that they must be considered by private and public deer managers when setting overall herd-management goals. – For complete article see http://www.al.com/sports/index.ssf/2012/04/coytoes_a_new_player_in_deer_m.html

California 04/13/12 Bakersfield, Kern County: Health officials are urging residents to get their pets vaccinated after a cat tested positive for rabies. The cat lived next door to woman who 500 bats living in the roof of her home but agencies say they can’t do much about it because the bat is a protected species. – See http://www.bakersfieldnow.com/news/local/Rare-case-of-cat-rabies-discovered-near-bat-infested-house-147399905.html

Colorado 04/14/12 Fowler, Otero County: A skunk found in the vicinity of Eighth Street and Grand Avenue has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.lajuntatribunedemocrat.com/news/x1830133045/Rabid-skunk-found-in-Fowler

New Mexico 04/15/12 Carlsbad, Eddy County: The recent rabies outbreak in the state has prompted at least one shelter to suspend efforts to trap feral cats due to risks associated with the TNR project. – See http://www.wisconsinrapidstribune.com/usatoday/article/39046121?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

Virginia 04/13/12 Petersburg: The local health department has issued a rabies alert after a feral cat that attacked a woman in the 2000 block of Mars Street in the Bunker Hill community tested positive for rabies. There is fear that other feral and domestic cats have been exposed. – See http://wtvr.com/2012/04/13/rabid-cat-attacks-petersburg-woman/

MASSACHUSETTS officials issue RABIES ALERT after a rabid RACCOON mixes with FERAL CAT colony ~ More RABIES reports from AL, CA, GA, NJ, NM, & NC ~ PENNSYLVANIA confirms state’s first case of WEST NILE VIRUS in a HORSE this year ~ CDC Reports: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending March 24, 2012.

Raccoon. Photo by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Massachusetts 03/30/12 Deerfield, Franklin County: Town officials are keeping an eye on Old Deerfield’s animals for any sign of rabies after a rabid raccoon was found mixing with feral cats near the Deerfield Inn. The town health agent and animal inspector, Richard Calisewski, said the rabid raccoon so far appears to have been an isolated incident. Nevertheless, he has interviewed or notified Old Deerfield residents and officials of Historic Deerfield, which owns the inn, and nearby Deerfield Academy. The cats that were seen with the raccoon March 15 have been captured and killed as a precaution, following state protocols, said Calisewski. – See http://www.gazettenet.com/2012/03/30/feral-cats-of-old-deerfield-not-infected-by-rabid-raccoon

Alabama 03/31/12 Moody, St. Clair County: Dr. Rachel Nelson, a veterinarian with Crossroads Animal Hospital, and three other staff members are receiving post-exposure prophylaxis rabies shots after coming in contact with a dog that has tested positive for rabies. The black Lab, which was nursing puppies, was euthanized last week. Nelson said the dog roamed freely in the Kelly Creek Road area of Odenville. Anyone exposed to the dog should seek medical advice. – See http://www.thestclairtimes.com/view/full_story/18049924/article-Dog-in-Moody-tests-positive-for-rabies?instance=home_right_bot

California 03/30/12 Monterey County: A dog and a skunk have tested positive for rabies, said the Monterey County Health Department. The dog from the North Monterey County area tested positive for rabies this week. At this time officials don’t know how the dog got rabies. A skunk from the North Monterey County area also tested positive this month. – See http://www.kionrightnow.com/story/17298955/several-rabbies-cases-reported-in-monterey-county

Georgia 03/30/12 Hall County: A rabies alert has been issued for the Old Orr Road area in South Hall County after a rabid raccoon came in contact with a dog Wednesday. The raccoon was shipped to the Georgia Public Health Lab, Virology Section in Decatur and confirmed positive for rabies Thursday. This is the ninth confirmed case of 2012. – See http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/section/6/article/65487/

New Jersey 03/30/12 Seaville, Cape May County: A pet was euthanized after being attacked by a raccoon that tested positive for rabies. It’s the first case of rabies in Upper Township since 2001. – See http://www.shorenewstoday.com/snt/news/index.php/upper-township/upper-township/22993-pet-in-upper-township-euthanized-after-rabid-raccoon-attack.html

New Mexico 03/30/12 Carlsbad, Eddy County: Officials are trapping a colony of 21 feral cats in the 2400 block of Primrose Street after an entanglement with a skunk that tested positive for rabies. Dr. Paul Ettestad, State Public Health Department Veterinarian, told police they have about seven days to get all of the cats trapped before the virus becomes infectious. As of Friday morning, which was day three, six of the cats had been trapped. Moyers said all city animal control officers were out in the residential area trying to get all of the animals, setting 16 traps. – See http://www.currentargus.com/ci_20294355/search-is-feral-cats-exposed-rabid-skunk

North Carolina 03/30/12 Jacksonville, Onslow County: A fox that attacked and bit a pet in Richlands tested positive for rabies, according to an Onslow County media release. Laboratory tests performed by the State Health Department on March 20 on a fox that attacked and bit a vaccinated dog in the Hewitt Road area of Richlands came back positive for rabies, the release states. The dog received a booster rabies vaccine. – See http://www.jdnews.com/articles/-102257–.html

Pennsylvania 03/29/12 lehighvalleylive.com: West Nile virus has shown up in Northampton County, marking Pennsylvania’s earliest confirmed case in a season statewide since officials first detected the disease in 2000. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection this afternoon said officials were notified a horse from Lower Saucon Township had to be euthanized because it was suffering from the virus, which is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito. – For complete article see http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/breaking-news/index.ssf/2012/03/lower_saucon_township_horse_eu.html

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending March 24, 2012:

Published March 30, 2012/ 61(12); ND-156-ND-169

Anaplasmosis . . . 5 . . . New York (3), Rhode Island (2),

Giardiasis . . . 105 . . . Alabama, Arizona (2), Arkansas (2), California (2), Florida (20), Idaho (3), Maine (5), Maryland, Massachusetts (4), Michigan, Missouri (4), Montana (2), Nebraska (8), Nevada (2), New York (16), Ohio (11), Oregon (3), Pennsylvania (7), Washington (5), West Virginia (5), Wisconsin,

Lyme Disease . . .  89. . .  Florida (2), Maine, Maryland (7), Massachusetts (2), New Jersey (33), New York (19), Pennsylvania (15), Rhode Island, Virginia (9),

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 2 . . . Missouri, Florida,

Rabies (Animal) . . . 51. . . Alabama, Arkansas (5), Maine (3), Missouri (2), New Hampshire, New York (9), Ohio (5), Texas (7), Virginia (17), West Virginia,

Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 2. . . California, New York,

Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 3 . . . Florida, New York, Tennessee.

CANADA: NEWFOUNDLAND officer shoots POLAR BEAR that beat in doors and windows on four homes ~ CALIFORNIA man claims BEAR rescued him when MOUNTAIN LION attacked ~ FLORIDA woman fails to save her DOG from hungry COYOTE ~ RABIES reports from CT, FL, IN, NJ, NY, NC, & TX.

Polar Bear. Courtesy of U.S. Global Change Research Program.

Canada:

Newfoundland 03/29/12 huffingtonpost.ca: by Sue Bailey – Fifty-five-year-old Louis Reardon got the shock of his life early Thursday when he leapt out of bed to his son’s cries of “Polar bear!” as a large male bear broke into their home in northern Newfoundland. “He had the door busted open to the dining room with his two front paws and his head in through the door,” Reardon said from tiny Goose Cove, just south of St. Anthony, N.L. “I mean, it frightened the wits right clean out of me, to be that close to a polar bear.” Reardon’s son Damien, 29, had heard a ruckus and flicked on the light to discover the animal. Polar bears are notoriously aggressive when cornered, and Damien slammed on a table trying to frighten the intruder as his father raced for a shotgun. “A polar bear doesn’t usually back down,” Louis Reardon said. “If he came in the house, God knows what he would have done before he went out.” His other son, his daughter, her three young children and her boyfriend had all been sleeping when the commotion started just after 4 a.m.

Louis Reardon said the bear was starting to retreat and he fired two shots over its head to frighten it. He didn’t want to risk wounding it and have it come back furious at him, he explained.Top of FormBottom of Form “I just fired over his head to drive him away. You don’t take chances on stuff like that.” His cousin, Daniel Reardon, said he was called soon after by wildlife officers who were trying to find Louis Reardon’s house. He said the bear beat in doors and broke windows at three other homes, and killed some sheep and ducks at a nearby stable without stopping to eat. “It seemed like it was killing for the sake of killing. It wasn’t hungry.” At one home, the bear “just broke the windows out of each side of the house and went on,” he said. “It seemed like he was in a bad mood.” Local RCMP say wildlife officers shot the bear, which witnesses estimate weighed at least 300 pounds or 135 kilograms. Louis Reardon said polar bears are occasionally spotted as they travel through the region, but he’d never heard of a similar attack. “Not like that, in my whole life,” he said. “It was pretty frightening. What was on my mind was the little kids in the house.”

California 03/27/12 paradisepost.com: by Trevor Warner – A Paradise man says he is lucky to be alive after an attack by a mountain lion Monday morning. Robert Biggs, 69, often hikes in the Bean Soup Flat area, which is about a mile and a half above Whisky Flats. He came across a mother bear, a yearling and a newborn, which were about 40 feet from where he was standing. After watching the bear family for a few minutes he decided to leave them be and turned to walk back up the trail. As he turned, a mountain lion pounced on him grabbing hold of his backpack with all four paws. “They usually grab hold of your head with all four paws, but my backpack was up above my head and (the mountain lion) grabbed it instead,” Biggs said. “It must have been stalking the little bear, but it was on me in seconds.” He wrestled with the cat, striking it in the head with a rock pick. The cat screamed when it was hit with the pick, but didn’t let go, Biggs said. Before he knew it, the mother bear came from behind and pounced on the cat, tearing its grip from the backpack. The bear and the cat battled for about 15 seconds, Biggs said, until the cat finally ran away. The bear went on its way as well. Biggs ended up with bite marks, scratches and bruises to his arm, but was otherwise uninjured. Biggs, a naturist, has hiked that same trail several times and has seen the mother bear and its cub last spring and fall. He said the encounters with the bears were friendly. – For complete article see http://www.paradisepost.com/news/ci_20269991/man-claims-attack-by-lion-saved-by-bear

Florida 03/28/12 Rotonda West, Charlotte County: Woman screams and chases a coyote into the woods by her home but fails to save her dog. See http://www.nbc-2.com/story/17279384/coyote-kills-family-dog-in-their-front-yard

Connecticut 03/27/12 Enfield, Hartford County: A skunk that had direct contact with a dog in the Thompsonville area of town last week has tested positive for rabies. This is the second rabies incident in Enfield in the past five weeks. See http://enfield.patch.com/articles/rabid-skunk-found-in-thompsonville

Florida 03/28/12 Callaway, Bay County: A raccoon that had contact with a dog in the Hugh Drive vicinity earlier this week has tested positive for rabies. This is the fifth confirmed case of animal rabies in the county this year. See http://www.newsherald.com/articles/rabies-101506-bay-county.html

Indiana 03/27/12 Bloomington, Monroe County: A bat that bit an Indiana University student while he slept in his dorm room has tested positive for rabies. He, his roommate, and a pest control worker are all receiving post-exposure prophylaxis rabies shots. See http://www.indystar.com/article/20120327/NEWS/120327032/IU-student-bitten-by-rabid-bat-Bloomington-dorm?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|IndyStar.com

New Jersey 03/28/12 Helmetta, Middlesex County: A skunk that was killed by a vaccinated dog last week in the vicinity of John Street and Railroad Avenue has tested positive for rabies. Two residents who had contact with the dog after the incident have been advised to seek medical advice. See http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/03/dog_dies_in_middlesex_countys.html

New York 03/28/12 Martinsburg, Lewis County: A raccoon that was observed exhibiting unusual behavior last week was captured and has tested positive for rabies. See http://www.wktv.com/news/health/Raccoon-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-Martinsburg-144703945.html

North Carolina 03/28/12 Hillsborough, Orange County: Health officials have confirmed the fourth case of animal rabies in the county this year. Residents heard dogs barking near US 70 and St. Mary’s Road last week and discovered that a skunk was in the dogs’ pen. The skunk was shot and tested positive for rabies. The two dogs were not up to date on vaccinations and the owners opted for euthanization. See http://www.chapelboro.com/pages/12674895.php?

Texas 03/27/12 Amarillo, Potter County: Animal control officers are setting traps for feral cats after a woman was bitten by one last week that tested positive for rabies. The incident occurred in the vicinity of N. Pullman Road. The woman who was bitten and several others who were exposed are receiving post-exposure prophylaxis rabies shots. See http://www.connectamarillo.com/news/story.aspx?list=195065&id=735211#.T3PcndVsXWB