Tag Archives: Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

HANTAVIRUS kills one NEW MEXICAN and hospitalizes another ~ CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER in the AMERICAS tops 1 million cases its first year ~ RABIES reports from PAx2 & VAx2.

Deer mouse. Courtesy of CDC.

Deer mouse. Courtesy of CDC.

New Mexico 12/12/14 ruidosonews.com: by Dianne Stallings – A 28-year-old man from McKinley County died this week from Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome and a 49-year-old man from Otero County still is hospitalized with the viral infection, but improving. . . . New Mexico this year has seen a total of six HPS cases, three resulting in death. Hantavirus is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings or saliva. People can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. The deer mouse is the main carrier for Sin Nombre virus, the Hantavirus strain found in New Mexico. – For complete article see http://www.ruidosonews.com/ruidoso-news/ci_27124697/otero-county-man-hospitalized-hantavirus

CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER:

Chikungunya.33883.cdcWestern Hemisphere 12/13/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – Exactly one year after the mosquito borne virus, chikungunya, made its first appearance in the Western Hemisphere as a locally acquired infection in the French Quarter section of the Caribbean island of St. Martin, the epidemic that has spread throughout the Americas has topped the 1 million case mark, according to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Friday. The most recent tally from the international health organization put the number of suspected and confirmed autochthonous, or locally acquired cases at 1,011,548, up nearly 36,000 cases from last week’s report. The eastern two-thirds of the island of Hispaniola, the Dominican Republic, after not reporting new cases for weeks, saw 25,381 additional cases reported to the UN agency. The Dominican Republic accounts for slightly more than half (51.8 percent)of all local transmission cases seen in the Western hemisphere with 524,297 total to date. In South America, Colombia saw an additional 6,350 cases, bringing their total to 45,513, the most cases reported on the South American continent. Brazil also reported a little spike recording 1,130 confirmed and 792 suspected chikungunya cases as of epidemiological week 46. Chikungunya virus is transmitted  by the same mosquitoes involved in the dengue fever  transmission (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus). - See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/chikungunya-in-the-americas-tops-1-million-cases-one-year-after-being-introduced-83961/ 

RABIES:

Pennsylvania 12/16/14 Montgomery County: A brown tabby cat named Jinx and missing its tail and hind legs that was being fostered at the Green Lane Veterinary Hospital in Green Lane has tested positive for rabies. Anyone who might have had contact with Jinx at the hospital between Nov. 29 and Dec. 11 should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.pottsmerc.comCAS_Kitten_Child_02/general-news/20141216/montco-confirms-rabies-in-crippled-cat-named-jinx

Pennsylvania 12/11/14 Washington County: An orange and white cat that has been held at the Washington Area Humane Society Shelter since May has tested positive for rabies. The incubation period can be as long as several years in rare cases. Currently, three people are being treated for potential exposure to the virus. Anyone who has been at the shelter and might have been exposed should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://triblive.com/news/adminpage/7361289-74/health-cat-officials#axzz3Lvw7N3ux

help984-05834Virginia 12/12/14 James City County: Health officials are looking for a dog that bit a person in James City County Wednesday afternoon. The attack happened around 4:30 p.m. in the neighborhood around Bridgewater Drive, according to the Peninsula Health District. A small white dog with tan spots — possibly a Fox Terrier or Jack Russell — was being walked by its owner when it bit the victim. Health officials say the victim will have to get a series of shots to prevent rabies, if the dog is not found and they can’t figure out if the animal has rabies. Once found, the dog won’t be taken away its owner, but will just have to stay inside for ten days. Anyone who has seen a dog with this description is asked to call the Peninsula Health District at 757-603-4277. – See http://wavy.com/2014/12/12/health-officials-looking-for-pet-dog-that-resident/

555f5f5Virginia 12/10/14 Halifax County: A stray Husky mix dog with a litter of six puppies that was found in the Boxwood Trail vicinity in the northern section of the county has tested positive for rabies. Two days after being picked up the mother began to show symptoms of being sick and was taken to a vet where the decision was made to put her to sleep. Because the pups were still nursing, they were also euthanized. Seven people exposed to the dogs were treated for possible exposure to the rabies virus. – See http://www.yourgv.com/news/local_news/article_69ac91c0-806d-11e4-a833-9b15f1940be0.html

BEAVERS in COLORADO spreading TULAREMIA ~ FLORIDIAN attacked by BLACK BEAR while walking DOG ~ Third NEW MEXICAN this year to die of HANTAVIRUS ~ CANADA: BIRD FLU in BRITISH COLUMBIA “highly pathogenic” ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) cases exceed 2,000 again this year ~ RABIES report from NORTH CAROLINA.

Beaver. Courtesy National Park Service.

Beaver. Courtesy National Park Service.

Colorado 12/03/14 summitdaily.com: Fifteen human cases of tularemia have reported so far this year, which is three times the annual average for the state. Tularemia-related small-mammal die-offs have been reported in at least 27 Colorado counties. Beavers found south of Breckenridge have tested positive for the bacteria, which can cause a potentially life-threatening disease. Of the 15 human cases reported this year, 11 patients have been hospitalized. – See http://www.summitdaily.com/news/14085888-113/tularemia-summit-bacteria-county

BEAR ATTACK:

blackbearjpgFlorida 12/04/14 wtsp.com: A Lake Mary resident who was walking her dog on Wednesday night was attacked by a black bear and bitten on the upper arm. Fortunately, the bear then abruptly left the area. According to officials, the dog spotted the bear and tried to chase it tugging at its leash and causing the woman to fall to the ground. The bear then attacked and ran off. Lake Mary, a suburb of Orlando, is in Seminole County. Last April another Lake Mary resident was mauled by a bear. Three people in the area were later charged for feeding bears. – See http://www.wtsp.com/story/news/local/florida/2014/12/04/fl-woman-bitten-by-bear-while-walking-dog/19914509/

Follow-Up Report: 12/06/14 therepublic.com: Officials have captured and killed the bear suspected to be the one that bit a woman walking her dog in Lake Mary last week. – See http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/460e5dfb2dd145ab99db2c11ab5d51f2/FL–Bear-Attack

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse. NPS.

Deer mouse. NPS.

New Mexico 12/05/14 krqe.com: Health officials say a 28-year-old McKinley County man is the third person in the state to die from Hantavirus this year. The Department of Health says there have been a total of six Hantavirus cases in the state this year. Those include a 49-year-old Otero County man who remains hospitalized but whose condition is improving. Hantavirus is a deadly disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings or saliva. The deer mouse is the main carrier of the strain found in New Mexico, and the department says it’s important to seal homes and other structures during cold weather because mice may try to enter buildings for food or shelter. The other fatal New Mexico cases involved a 67-year-old San Juan County woman and a 59-year-old McKinley County man. – See http://krqe.com/2014/12/05/nm-records-3rd-hantavirus-death-in-2014/

Canada:

BIRD FLU VIRUS:

Turkeys-18British Columbia 12/05/14 foxnews.com: The bird flu virus that has killed thousands of birds on two Canadian farms in British Columbia is the “highly pathogenic” H5N2 strain, Canada’s chief veterinary officer Harpreet Kochhar said on Thursday. The strain was last detected in Canada in the province of Manitoba in 2010, but that virus was considered less contagious and deadly, he said. Canada said on Tuesday that tests had found avian influenza on two British Columbia farms that raise turkeys and broiler chickens. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed on Thursday that two additional farms located between the original two had tested positive for bird flu. Kochhar said he was not aware of other farms with unusual levels of bird deaths, but said it was too early to say the disease was now contained.

Florida_chicken_houseAvian influenza is an infectious viral disease of birds. Most bird flu viruses do not infect humans or pose a food safety risk when poultry products are properly handled and cooked. The fact that the British Columbia strain is highly pathogenic does not necessarily mean it poses more risk to humans than previous viruses found in Canada, said John Spika of the Public Health Agency of Canada. South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Japan have all imposed varying bans on Canadian poultry products. – See http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/12/05/canada-bird-flu-virus-identified-as-highly-pathogenic-strain/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

aaCDC-LogoNational 12/04/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – The number of human West Nile virus (WNV) infections have exceeded 2,000 in 2014, according to newly published data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This makes it the third year in a row that the United States has seen 2,000 cases or more. As of December 2, overall, 2,002 cases of West Nile virus disease in people have been reported to CDC. Of these, 1,196 (60%) were classified as neuro-invasive disease (such as meningitis or encephalitis) and 806 (40%) were classified as non-neuro-invasive disease. Of this total there has been 76 fatalities, or almost 4 percent. California continues to top all states with 750 cases according to the CDC (California DPH reports 769) accounting for approximately 38 percent of all cases nationally. In 2013, 2,469 cases were reported with 119 deaths, while in 2012, 5,674 cases were reported with 286 deaths. – For complete article with history of WNV see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/west-nile-virus-cases-top-2000-in-the-us-for-3rd-year-in-a-row-73686/

RABIES:

Rabies.syringeNorth Carolina 12/02/14 Catawba County: A dog that bit a veterinarian when it was brought in for treatment at an Emergency Vet Clinic in Hickory on Nov. 26th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wsoctv.com/news/news/local/dog-tests-positive-rabies-after-biting-vet-tech-hi/njKP8/

DEER HUNTERS in PENNSYLVANIA face new reality: CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE ~ NORTH DAKOTA researchers confirm local TICKS carrying LYME DISEASE ~ US Army enlists COWS with human genes to fight HANTAVIRUS.

Whitetail buck. Courtesy National Park Service.

Whitetail buck. Courtesy National Park Service.

Pennsylvania 11/30/14 citizensvoice.com: by Kent Jackson – Hunters entering the woods in Pennsylvania on Monday for the start of the rifle deer season face a new realty. Some of the deer that they pursue carry an incurable, fatal disease. Chronic wasting disease appeared in a deer in Pennsylvania in 2012 after advancing through 21 other states and two provinces of Canada. “From other states regardless of what you do, you can’t eliminate it. It is there to stay once it’s on the landscape,” Matthew Hough, the executive director of the Pennsylvania Game Commission, said during a conference call with reporters on Nov. 19. The commission set special rules for three areas of the state where deer tested positive for the disease. Hunters cannot transport parts of the deer such as the brain, spinal cord, lymph nodes, spleen and eyeballs out of those areas. Nor can they feed deer or use urine-based lures, which bring deer close together where the risk of spreading the disease heightens.

Whitetail buck with CWD.

Whitetail buck with CWD.

In the rest of the state, hunters should take precautions such as wearing gloves, boning out meat, and minimizing contact with high-risk parts when they field dress deer. The rifle season starts Monday and concludes Dec. 13. In most of the state, hunters can take bucks through Friday, but they can hunt a buck or a doe from Saturday to the end of the season. The buck-only territory for the first five days includes Hazleton and parts of Schuylkill, Carbon and Columbia counties in Wildlife Management Unit 4C and 13 other WMUs. Nine WMUs have buck and doe hunting throughout the two-week season. While there is no evidence that chronic wasting disease affects humans, research isn’t conclusive, and hunters are advised not to eat meat from infected animals. – For complete article including PA contacts for CWD testing see http://citizensvoice.com/sports/it-is-here-to-stay-here-to-stay-1.1795223

LYME DISEASE:

lyme_disease_hidden_epidemic_poster-p228833588305763989t5wm_400North Dakota 11/25/14 prairiebizmag.com: by Anna Burleson – Lyme disease has been found in ticks in the Red River Valley by several researchers at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. The disease is transmitted through the bites of a certain breed of infected tick and if left untreated can spread throughout a person’s nervous system, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

und-logo-20116UND Biology Department professor Jefferson Vaughan led a team with assistant professor Catherine Brissette from the School of Medicine and Health Sciences to look into the prevalence of the disease after he discovered local veterinarians had seen “different-looking” ticks on pets they were treating. “People are beginning to really realize particularly that dogs and sometimes cats are sentinels for types of diseases that are normally wildlife diseases, but can also cause diseases in humans,” Vaughan said.

American Dog Tick

American Dog Tick

The breed of tick most frequently found in the Red River Valley is commonly called an American Dog Tick and is known for its large brown appearance.Vaughan and graduate student Nate Russart began investigating the appearance of the much smaller Deer Tick, as it’s commonly known, in 2010 and discovered the ticks were carrying Lyme disease.

Deer Tick

Deer Tick

But Vaughan said the discovery simply means people should be more diligent about searching themselves for the presence of ticks after being in fields or forests. “It used to be an annoyance, just like mosquitoes were ten years ago, but now they’re more than an annoyance,” he said. “It’s a public health issue.” – For complete article see http://www.prairiebizmag.com/event/article/id/21810/#sthash.zBpHdMsR.dpuf

HANTAVIRUS:

09 Antibody StructureGlobal 11/26/14 sciencemag.org: by David Shultz – Humans have been using antibody therapies to treat infectious disease for more than 100 years. Blood plasma from influenza survivors administered to sick patients in 1912 may have contributed to their dramatic turnaround. In the years since, immune proteins from survivors have been administered to infected individuals in an attempt to combat diseases like Lassa fever, SARS, and even Ebola.

300px-USAMRIID_LogoIt’s hard, however, to find survivors who can donate plasma containing these lifesaving immune proteins. Now, a team led by researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) in Frederick, Maryland, has used genetically engineered cows to produce large amounts of human antibodies against hantavirus, an often deadly disease mainly transmitted from rodents to people. In animal models, at least, these antibodies provided robust protection against the virus, opening the door to therapies to treat and prevent hantavirus, for which there is no cure. The bioproduction technique also holds promise for generating antibodies against other infectious agents. – For complete article see http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2014/11/cows-human-chromosomes-enlisted-fight-hantavirus

Study finds TICKS like to hang out at GOLF COURSES ~ COLORADAN succumb s to HANTAVIRUS ~ TICK-BORNE ANAPLASMOSIS cases nearly double in MAINE ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: Test confirms first GRAY WOLF near GRAND CANYON in 75 years ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from CALIFORNIA ~ RABIES reports from NJ, PA & VA.

Courtesy of TickEncounter Research Center, University of Rhode Island.

Courtesy of TickEncounter Research Center, University of Rhode Island.

Global 11/22/14 business-standard.com: Golf courses are prime habitats for ticks, the tiny bloodsucking creatures, says a new study. Ticks like to feed at the boundaries between the woods and open spaces – the kind of settings found in golf courses. “Golf courses are the perfect habitat for ticks. This is because people on golf courses scare away the animals that usually prey on small rodents, so these tick-harboring rodents flourish,” said Gregory Owens of the School of Health Sciences and Practice at the New York Medical College in the US.

1319561v3v1In the study, Owens and his colleagues surveyed 29 golfers at a course in New York, where Lyme disease, an infection carried by certain ticks, is native. Nearly three-quarters of the golfers said they had found a tick on themselves after golfing, and 24 percent said they had been diagnosed with Lyme disease in the past. About one third of the golfers said they did not check themselves for ticks after golfing, and 72 percent did not use insect repellent while golfing, found the study.

Deer aka Black-legged Tick stages.

Deer aka Black-legged Tick stages.

Because the study was small, more research is needed to see how common tick-prevention behavior is among golfers, Owens said. Ticks are most active between April and September, but it is important to take preventive measures year-round. The study was presented at the American Public Health Association meeting in New Orleans.- See http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/golf-courses-are-hotspots-for-ticks-114112200181_1.html

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

Colorado 11/21/14 denverpost.com: by Electa Draper – A southeastern Adams County man died of hantavirus Nov. 15, the Tri-County Health Department reported Friday. The adult male, whose name was not released, likely was infected with hantavirus while doing home plumbing repairs in a small space with rodent droppings or in a rodent-infested garage, health officials said in a news release. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is a rare condition, with an average of four cases a year in Colorado, caused by a virus carried by rodents, especially deer mice. People are exposed to hantavirus by inhaling dust that contains the feces, urine or saliva of deer mice. It is fatal to humans in almost half the cases. – For complete article see http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_26988497/adam-county-mans-death-caused-by-hantavirus-health

ANAPLASMOSIS:

ana_incid.cdcMaine 11/22/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – The number of cases of the tick borne bacterial disease, anaplasmosis, continue to climb in Maine as the state Centers for Disease Control reports 164 cases statewide as of Nov. 18. This number is up 70 from the entire 2013 when 94 cases were reported. Anaplasmosis was first recognized as a disease of humans in the United States in the mid-1990’s, but did not become a reportable disease until 1999. It is caused by the bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Anaplasmosis is most frequently reported from the upper midwestern and northeastern United States. The areas from which cases are reported correspond with the known geographic distribution of Lyme disease. The tick responsible for transmission of A. phagocytophilum in the upper Midwest and northeastern U.S. is the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Along the West Coast, the western black-legged tick (I. pacificus) may transmit the organism. These tick species also transmit the agents of Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) and babesiosis (Babesia species), and human co-infections with these organisms have occasionally been reported. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-anaplasmosis-cases-nearly-double-last-years-count-65434/

FOLLOW-UP REPORT:

GRAY WOLF:

(See “Are GRAY WOLVES returning to GRAND CANYON?” posted 11/18/14)

12A Canid, a wolf or wolf hybrid seen near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Photo taken Oct. 27, 2014. Courtesy Arizona Game and Fish Dept.Arizona 11/21/14 tucson.com: by Felicia Fonseca – A female gray wolf from the Northern Rockies traveled hundreds of miles into Northern Arizona, marking the species’ first appearance in the region in more than 70 years and the farthest journey south, wildlife officials confirmed Friday. A wolf-like animal had been spotted roaming the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and the adjacent national forest since last month. Biologists collected its scat and sent it to a University of Idaho laboratory for testing, verifying what environmentalists had suspected based on its appearance and a radio collar around its neck. “The corroboration is really good to get,” said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity. Biologists don’t know the wolf’s age or from where it traveled. The radio collar wasn’t transmitting a signal, and cold weather forced biologists to suspend efforts to capture the animal and replace the collar.

A Northern Rockies gray wolf hadn’t been seen in the Grand Canyon area since the 1940s.The Idaho lab might be able to glean more details about the wolf from its DNA, but U.S. Fish and Wildlife spokesman Jeff Humphrey said that could take several weeks or months. “We’ll let this wolf be a wolf where it’s at, and if it decides it’s going to move back north, it can do that,” he said. “Or if somebody joins her, then that’s nature taking its course.” Wolves often roam vast distances in search of food and mates. But the farther they go, the less likely they are to find a mate, said Ed Bangs, who led recovery efforts for wolves in the Northern Rockies over two decades before retiring from the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2011. “It’s looking for love,” he said. “It leaves the core population and doesn’t know the love of its life is going to be right over the next hill, so it just keeps traveling.” For complete article see http://tucson.com/ap/national/dna-confirms-wolf-traveled-hundreds-of-miles-to-grand-canyon/article_66537d48-72f8-56cd-af01-3d00b4456c85.html

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 11/19/14 CA Dept of Health: There were 19 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Fresno (1), Kern (1), Los Angeles (11), Orange (3), San Bernardino (1), Stanislaus (1), and Sutter (1). 27 WNV-related fatalities have been reported to CDPH from twelve local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Kern (1), Long Beach City (2), Los Angeles (5), Orange (7), Placer (1), Sacramento (2), San Diego (1), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (3), and Tehama (1). 752 human cases from 31 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://www.westnile.ca.gov/

RABIES:

New Jersey 11/19/14 Somerset County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a black, brown and white tabby kitten that scratched a resident in the vicinity of Emerald Place in Franklin Township tested positive for the virus. Anyone in contact with this kitten in the Emerald Place area or surrounding neighborhoods is asked to call county health officials at (908) 231-7155 as soon as possible. – See http://patch.com/new-jersey/bridgewater/rabies-exposure-reported-franklin-township-0

IMG4336e-L-001Pennsylvania 11/20/14 Dauphin County: A feral cat brought to the Steelton Community Cat program presenting neurological symptoms has tested positive for rabies. A Rabies Alert has been issued warning residents in the Steelton and Swatara Township areas of the possible presence of the virus in the local wildlife and especially the feral cat population. – See http://www.abc27.com/story/27442070/steelton-cat-tests-positive-for-rabies

Virginia 11/19/14 Chesapeake: A black and white female cat with yellow eyes that attacked three people on November 13th in the Warrington Hall community has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.bdtonline.com/news/cat-that-attacked-in-va-had-rabies/article_613eea08-6ff9-11e4-952e-4fbbcfe01033.html

Invasive MOSQUITO threatens southern CALIFORNIA with exotic viruses ~ CALIFORNIA county issues HANTAVIRUS ALERT ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE reports third HUMAN CASE of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and second EEE fatality ~ GEORGIAN scratched by RABID STRAY CAT.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

California 10/16/14 capitalpress.com: Officials have confirmed that the black-and-white striped Aedes aegypti or yellow fever mosquito was found last week in Commerce and Pico Rivera east of Los Angeles. Last year the species was found in other parts of the state including the Central Coast and Central Valley. The mosquito is aggressive, is active during daylight hours, and is capable of transmitting the yellow, dengue and chikungunya fever viruses, though none of these diseases have been reported in Los Angeles County. – See http://www.capitalpress.com/California/20141016/yellow-fever-mosquito-reaches-southern-california

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse

Deer mouse

California 10/17/14 San Diego County News Center: Media Release – A North American deer mouse trapped in routine monitoring in a rural part of Fallbrook has tested positive for hantavirus, and County officials are reminding people to be careful if they ever have to clean up mice or rodent nests. The mouse was the seventh rodent caught this year in the county to test positive for hantavirus, a disease that can be fatal. People have very little chance of being exposed to hantavirus, despite the fact that it is common in San Diego County, as long as wild rodents stay in the wild and don’t get inside homes, garages, sheds and cabins. However, people can be exposed if they sweep or vacuum places where infected rodents have nested. That’s because hantavirus can be inhaled if people disturb areas where dust from infected rodents, dried saliva, urine or feces can be “kicked up” into the air. “The best way to protect yourself is to avoid exposure,” said County Department of Environmental Health Director Elizabeth Pozzebon. “But if you have to clean an area where rodents have been don’t sweep or vacuum. Use wet-cleaning methods.” – For complete article and precautions see http://www.countynewscenter.com/news/deer-mouse-fallbrook-tests-positive-hantavirus

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

eee-threat-249x187New Hampshire 10/15/14 NH Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials confirm the third human case of EEE in an adult resident of Manchester in Hillsborough County. The individual died in mid-September and is the second EEE-related fatality in the state so far this year. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2014/10-oct/10152014eeecase.htm

RABIES:

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAGeorgia 10/17/14 Madison County: A stray cat that scratched the owner of property located in the 80 block of Gatewood Drive in Colbert on Oct. 4th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/7241-Colbert-woman-scratched-by-rabid-cat.html

BEAR kills researcher in WYOMING ~ Follow-Up Report: CALIFORNIA officials kill MOUNTAIN LION that attacked young boy ~ Another NEW MEXICAN contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ VERMONTER contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ 2 COLORADANS test positive for TULAREMIA ~ Travel Warning: 113 deaths in CARIBBEAN region attributed to CHIKUNGUNYA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from IL ~ RABIES reports from CT, MD, SC & TX.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Wyoming 09/15/14 go.com: by Bob Moen – A 31-year-old Utah man doing research alone in a remote backcountry area has died in a bear attack in the Bridger-Teton National Forest in northwest Wyoming. Officials aren’t certain yet what type of bear killed Adam Thomas Stewart of Virgin, Utah. “I’m assuming grizzly, but we don’t have the bear so I can’t say for certain,” Fremont County Coroner Ed McAuslan said Monday. “At this particular time we’re still putting stuff together.” Fremont County Undersheriff Ryan Lee said Stewart was in a remote area checking on a research plot when he failed to return as expected on Sept. 5. He was reported missing on Sept. 7, prompting a search. His body was found last Friday between his campsite and the research plot, Lee said.

washakie-wilderness01.gifStewart last contacted his employer on Sept. 4 from a trailhead, he said. Lee didn’t have the name of the company Stewart worked for. “It was a very short trip. It was basically an in and out type thing with at least one overnight stay,” Lee said. Stewart’s camp was found intact about 3 miles from where his body was found, he said. Lee and McAuslan declined to release what details led them to believe it was a bear attack. Jason Hunter, a regional supervisor with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, said investigators saw signs of both grizzly and black bears in the area where Stewart’s body was found. – For complete article see http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/bear-attack-wyoming-kills-utah-man-25517661

Follow-Up Report:

Mountain Lion:

s_mountain-lion-0002(See CALIFORNIA child attacked by MOUNTAIN LION posted Sept. 13, 2014)

California 09/12/14 kcra.com: Officials say DNA testing has confirmed that a 74-pound, 2-year-old mountain lion shot and killed on Sept. 10th is the same one that attacked a young boy on a hiking trail near Cupertino on Sept. 7th. The lion was treed before being shot just about 130 yards from the attack site. – See http://www.kcra.com/news/tests-show-slain-mountain-lion-attacked-boy-in-bay-area/28032766

Hantavirus:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

New Mexico 09/17/14 NM Dept of Health: Media Release – A 50-year-old man from San Juan County is hospitalized with laboratory confirmed Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). This is the fourth case of Hantavirus in New Mexico this year. An environmental investigation will be conducted at the home of the patient to help reduce the risk to others. “This case is another reminder that Hantavirus is present in deer mice in New Mexico,” said Department of Health Cabinet Secretary Retta Ward, MPH. “I want all New Mexicans to make sure they follow our prevention guidelines to keep themselves and their families safe from Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.” – See http://nmhealth.org/news/disease/2014/9/?view=136

Vermont 09/16/14 VT Dept of Health: Media Release – An out-of-state resident who was cleaning a poorly ventilated seasonal home last month contracted hantavirus. It’s most likely that the victim was exposed to rodent droppings that often carry the virus, which can become airborne during the cleaning process and cause a life-threatening respiratory illness. About one-third of those who contract hantavirus do not survive. – See http://healthvermont.gov/news/2014/091614_hantavirus.aspx

Tularemia:

Colorado 09/16/14 El Paso County Public Health: Media Release – A dead rabbit found south of Highway 94 and west of Yoder has tested positive for tularemia, also known as rabbit fever. – See http://www.elpasocountyhealth.org/news/news-release/2014/tularemia-found-baq4ijctzixmuu7acvc5eastern-el-paso-county-wild-rabbit

Colorado 09/18/14 Boulder County Dept of Health: Media Release – A Louisville resident has tested positive for tularemia after exposure to a dead rabbit while walking with her dog near Coyote Run Open Space in Louisville. The resident had a small cut on her knee, where the tularemia bacteria are thought to have entered her body. The resident was seen by multiple doctors after experiencing swollen lymph nodes, abdominal pain, and pain in the front of her knee. She developed a high fever, headache, and general malaise and was admitted to the hospital. Her condition has greatly improved, and she is recovering at home. This is the second Boulder County resident to test positive for the tularemia this year; nine people have tested positive for the disease in Colorado. In most of the cases, people were exposed to the disease while participating in outdoor activities, such as mowing or recreating in areas where sick or dead wildlife were present. – See http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/bc12.aspx?articleid=4212&zoneid=5

Travel Warning:

716ed7c4d80f74Caribbean Basin 09/15/14 foxnews.com: At least 113 people have died in the Americas, with all the fatalities reported in the Caribbean region, after becoming infected with the Chikungunya virus, the Pan American Health Organization, or PAHO, said, adding that it was not yet clear if these deaths were directly attributable to the virus. In its latest report, which includes figures as of Sept. 12, the PAHO confirmed 55 deaths linked to the virus in Martinique since last December, when the disease was first detected in the Americas. Forty-nine deaths were reported in Guadeloupe, six in the Dominican Republic and three in St. Martin, where the virus was first found in the Americas. . . . . . A total of 644,686 suspected and 9,640 confirmed Chikungunya cases have been reported in the region as of Sept. 8, the Caribbean Public Health Agency, or CARPHA, said. – See http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/health/2014/09/15/death-toll-from-chikungunya-hits-113-in-caribbean-paho-says/

West Nile Virus (WNV):

DuPage_logoIllinois 09/15/14 Dupage County Health Dept: Media Release – The first reported human case of WNV in the county has been confirmed in a male Naperville resident in his 50s. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/wnvhuman2014

Rabies:

help984-05834Connecticut 09/17/14 New Haven County: by David Moran – Police are seeking the public’s help in locating a man who dropped a bat off at a local veterinarian that tested positive for rabies because they fear he may have been exposed to the virus himself. An unidentified man left a box containing a live bat at the Mount Carmel Veterinary Hospital on Whitney Avenue in Hamden on Sept. 16 and then left without giving his name. The veterinarian chose to euthanize the bat and sent it to the Connecticut Department of Public Health where it tested positive for rabies. Hamden police said it is “strongly recommended” that the man who delivered the live bat to the animal hospital immediately seek medical attention to determine if he may have contacted rabies from the animal. Police describe the man as a black male between the ages of 18 and 25, standing approximately 5’10,” with a medium build and a “Mohawk-style” haircut. Anyone with information on this individual is asked to call Hamden Animal control at 203-230-4080. – See http://www.courant.com/community/hamden/hc-hamden-rabies-outbreak-0918-20140917-story.html

Maryland 09/17/14 Worcester County: A stray cat that bit an adult on Sept.15th at the Milburn Landing campground area of the Pocomoke River State Park in Snow Hill has tested positive for rabies. The cat was described as a medium adult male, dark gray with white under its chin and belly, with four white feet. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/story/news/local/maryland/2014/09/17/rabites-bite-worcester/15768459/

South Carolina 09/15/14 Anderson County: A stray cat in the southeastern part of the county that potentially exposed two people to rabies on Sept. 11th has tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.wyff4.com/news/stray-cat-exposes-two-people-to-rabies/28064590

Texas 09/17/14 Brazos County: The College Station Police Department Animal Control is investigating two dog attacks. The first victim says she was visiting a store in the 1900 block of Texas Ave Saturday evening when she was bitten by a dog. The dog was described as being brown and fluffy, medium in help-desk545451size, and of unknown gender and breed. She was not able to describe the dog’s owner.

The second attack happened Monday afternoon. The victim said she was at the dog park on Rock Prairie Road with her two dogs. When one of them ran towards the pond, the victim said another dog, described as a red/white male pit bull wearing a red collar, charged at her dog and began attacking it. The victim grabbed the back legs of the pit bull to get it off her dog. The pit bull turned around and bit the woman’s right hand. Animal Control is asking for the public’s help in locating these dogs to allow for observation and rule out possible rabies exposure to the victims. Anyone with information is asked to contact College Station Police Department Animal Control at (979)764-3600.

COLORADAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ Second person in SASKATCHEWAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ CHIKUNGUNYA cases in the CARIBBEAN top half-million mark ~ ARIZONA warns of PSITTACOSIS in LOVEBIRDS ~ RABBITS and CATS in COLORADO positive for TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) numbers NATIONALLY and WNV reports from ND, SD & TX ~ Interesting RABIES cases reported in GAx2, KS, MDx2 & NJ.

Deer Mouse. Courtesy CDC.

Deer Mouse. Courtesy CDC.

Colorado 08/05/14 Eagle County: A 41-year-old man had lived in Eagle County for only two months before hantavirus killed him. Manuel Hernandez was from Mexico and was here on a work visa. His death makes him Eagle County’s first case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome since 2005, said Jennifer Ludwig, the county’s public health director. Coroner Kara Bettis said Hernandez’s manner of death was natural. He died a couple weeks ago, Bettis said. The investigation took that long because the Centers for Disease Control requires two sets of lab results to confirm a hantavirus death. “Hantavirus causes death in approximately 40 percent of cases,” Ludwig said. – For complete article and more re Hantavirus see http://www.vaildaily.com/news/12488973-113/hantavirus-rodent-areas-cases

Canada 08/05/14 Saskatchewan: An adult in the northern tier of the province has died after contracting hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. It is the second death and fourth case reported in the province so far this year. Hantavirus can be transmitted by breathing in contaminated airborne particles from the droppings, urine and saliva of infected deer mice and certain other rodents that carry the disease. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Second+hantavirus+death+reported+Saskatchewan/10091160/story.html

Chikungunya Fever:

image[3]Western Hemisphere 08/04/14 cidrap.umn.edu: by Robert Roos – The tally of chikungunya cases in the Caribbean climbed by nearly 38,000 last week, topping the half million mark, with the Dominican Republic again contributing most of the increase, according to an Aug 1 update from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). The total reached 513,393 cases, compared with 473,523 a week earlier, an increase of 37,870, or 8.0%. Those numbers include suspected and confirmed illnesses that are locally acquired and imported cases. The vast majority of them—508,122 as of Aug 1—are suspected local cases. The Dominican Republic accounted for 26,012 of the new cases last week and more than half of all cases, with an overall total of 307,933, according to PAHO. Neighboring Haiti had only 50 new cases last week, all classified as suspected, for a total of 64,709. The death toll in the epidemic, which began last December, grew by 6, to 32. All 6 deaths were in Martinique, where the toll is now 19. The country’s overall case count reached 54,075, or 3,620 more than the week before. The total of confirmed local cases actually dropped by 524 last week, from 5,260 to 4,736, largely because of a decrease in French Guiana. The tally of confirmed local cases there sank from 665 to 89, while suspected cases jumped from zero to 1,194 and imported cases dropped from 216 to zero. Another Caribbean country that had a sizable jump in cases was Guadeloupe, where the total rose by 6,740, to 71,068.

joint_painIn Central America, El Salvador reported 376 new cases for a total of 2,353. Puerto Rico reported 390 new suspected cases for a total of 1,033. The numbers of confirmed and imported cases stayed the same at 215 and 17, respectively. As for the United States, PAHO listed 380 imported cases, or 18 fewer than the 398 reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Jul 30. The nation has had four locally acquired cases, all in Florida, including two reported last week. Meanwhile, imported cases in Mexico reached 380, an increase of 98, with local cases staying at 2. Venezuela reported 86 cases, with 30 local confirmed and 56 imported ones, compared with 57 a week earlier, according to PAHO. – See http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2014/08/caribbean-chikungunya-cases-climb-8-top-500000

Psittacosis:

Agapornis_-probably_a_hybrid-5iArizona 08/05/14 azcentral.com: by Chris Williams – Arizona Game and Fish Department officials want the public to be aware of a potential health threat following the discovery of the disease psittacosis, also known as parrot fever, in dead lovebirds in Scottsdale. Recently a Scottsdale homeowner reported finding 20 dead lovebirds in his yard. Game and Fish test results came in Friday, showing the birds had psittacosis. The disease can spread to humans and be difficult to diagnose. Last summer, it infected an east Mesa woman who used a leaf blower to clean up after some messy lovebirds, according to Game and Fish. She came down with a mysterious respiratory condition doctors had a tough time figuring out. When Game and Fish discovered psittacosis in dead birds on her property, that gave doctors the information they needed to diagnose her. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/scottsdale/2014/08/05/12news-parrot-fever-psittacosis-scottsdale/13624329/

Tularemia:

imagesCAC3YRG5Colorado 08/03/14 Montrosepress.com: Wild rabbits and two domestic cats in Montrose County have tested presumptively positive for tularemia, which can be transmitted to humans, most commonly through handling infected animals. – See http://www.montrosepress.com/news/county-warns-of-tularemia-after-cats-turn-up-positive/article_c1f3e8e8-1acd-11e4-8967-001a4bcf887a.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

West+Nile+Virus55447National 08/01/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – California has accounted for 33 percent of the at least 60 confirmed human West Nile virus (WNV) cases reported nationally, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The Golden State has reported 20 human WNV cases to date from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Fresno (4), Kern (1), Lake (1), Orange (3), Solano (1), Stanislaus (5) and Tulare (3). . . . To date, three people have died from complications due to WNV–Arizona, Louisiana and Missouri. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/california-accounts-for-a-third-of-all-human-west-nile-virus-cases-99491/

North Dakota 08/05/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The patient is a female in her 50s residing in Richland County. – For complete release see http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-08-05-WNV%20First%20Human%20Case%202014%20NR%20-%20v%20FINAL.pdf

South Dakota 08/05/14 SD Sept of Health: Officials have confirmed 12 human cases of WNV statewide so far this year. – For details, including counties reporting one or more cases see http://doh.sd.gov/documents/diseases/WNVupdate8-5.pdf

Texas 08/06/14 TX Dept of State Health: Officials have confirmed 15 human cases of WNV statewide so far this year. Seven cases are the more severe neuro-invasive form and eight cases are the milder fever form of the disease. Montgomery County alone has reported a total of six cases. – For a list of the other eight counties reporting WNV, and more re WNV, see https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/updates.shtm

Rabies:

RabidgoatGeorgia 08/04/14 Pike County: A goat, which was part of a herd of 17 stabled on McCrary Road in Molena has tested positive for rabies. Family members have received post-exposure vaccinations. – See http://www.pikecountygeorgia.com/archives/4765-Case-of-rabies-confirmed-in-Molena.html

Looking-for-Kittens-001Georgia 08/05/14 Hall County: A cat in the Gillsville Highway area of the eastern part of the county has tested positive for rabies. Two people are being treated after being exposed to the virus. – See http://www.cbs46.com/story/26201097/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-hall-county

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAKansas 07/29/14 Lyon County: A cow stabled in the county has tested positive for rabies. – http://cjonline.com/news/2014-07-29/rabies-confirmed-lyon-county-cow

 

3610192083_22eaf9db7aMaryland 07/28/14 Wicomico County: A feral kitten that scratched a Pittsville resident on Friendship Road has tested positive for rabies. Area residents are reported to have said “the (feral) cat population has become a big problem in town.” – See http://www.wboc.com/story/26132372/rabies-clinic-scheduled-after-rabid-cat-found

help_signMaryland 07/28/14 Frederick County: (Health officials are) searching for the owner of a dog that repeatedly bit a man Saturday night in Frederick.  The incident happened Saturday, July 26, 2014 around 10 p.m. near Hillcrest Drive at Hill Street Park. The FCHD said they need to speak with the owner of the dog so that the bite victim may avoid receiving unnecessary post-exposure rabies vaccinations.  The dog is described as a brownish, medium-sized, medium hair length, possible pit bull-mix that was not leashed. The dog was wearing a collar, officials say.  Anyone who has information about the owner’s identity is asked to call the FCHD at 301-600-1717 or Frederick County Animal Control at 301-600-1544.  Human cases of rabies are fatal if untreated. If you or someone in your family is bitten or scratched by a dog or cat, you should contact FCAC for assistance.  – See http://www.your4state.com/story/d/story/man-bitten-by-dog-in-frederick-officials-search-fo/27729/sDWUr9x_M0mhe3VD1SEH0g

IMG4336e-L-001New Jersey 07/30/14 Burlington County: A kitten in the township of Medford that has tested positive for rabies has reportedly exposed at least 13 people to the virus, all of whom must now receive post-exposure prophylaxis treatment. At least three other cats and a dog were also exposed and will be quarantined for six months. – See http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/rabies-alert-issued-in-medford-after-kitten-tests-positive/article_9e211201-9ad0-5474-980d-8d7f128dfe1e.html