Tag Archives: Q Fever

ALASKAN fatally shoots attacking BROWN BEAR sow ~ BEAR attacks off-duty sheriff’s deputy in COLORADO ~ Four cases of Q FEVER identified in OREGON ~ Photos confirm OREGON’s celebrity WOLF OR-7 has at least 3 pups ~ NEW MEXICAN hospitalized with TULAREMIA ~ COLORADO youth contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from AZ & LA ~ Unusual RABIES report from SC.

Brown Bear. Courtesy National Park Service.

Brown Bear. Courtesy National Park Service.

Alaska 07/25/14 newsobserver.com: According to wildlife officials, an Eagle River man walking near his home was being attacked by a brown bear sow with a cub when he drew his gun and fired three rounds killing the sow. The bear bit the man’s arm and hand and he was taken to the hospital by his wife but his injuries were minor. This is the second mauling by a bear in the area this week. – See http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/07/25/4029338/man-fatally-shoots-bear-attacking.html?sp=/99/102/111/419/

Front paw of grizzly bear yearling; Jim Peaco; June 27, 2005Colorado 07/27/14 Pitkin County: An Aspen woman identified as off-duty sheriff’s deputy Erin Smiddy was attacked by a bear while walking down an alley between Galena and Mill streets in Aspen on July 27th. It was reported that Smiddy sustained injuries to her abdomen and leg when the bear swiped her. Police say it might have been the same bear that had been rummaging for food in an unsecured dumpster in the same alley a half hour earlier. Colorado Parks and Wildlife are now searching for the bear. – See http://www.9news.com/story/news/local/2014/07/27/aspen-bear-attack-galena-mill-street-alley/13245241/

Q Fever:

Q fever.333Oregon 07/24/14 democratherald.com: by Alex Paul – Four cases of acute Q Fever have been identified in Linn and Benton counties since May, according to Frank Moore, Linn County Public Health director. In Linn County, the infection appears to be in the Harrisburg area. In each county, one case is confirmed and the other is presumptive, Moore said. “They are 45 miles apart, so they aren’t related,” Moore said. “We have to emphasize that the general public is not at risk, but people should be diligent about washing their hands, just like we advise during flu season.” Moore said that usually there are only three to five cases statewide in a year. . . . Q Fever is found in cattle, sheep and goats and it is spread through milk, urine and feces. The number of organisms are unusually high during birthing in the amniotic fluids and placentas of animals, especially sheep. Especially at risk are farmers, ranchers, livestock shearers, stockyard workers, animal transporters and laboratory workers as well as veterinary staffers.

Sheep_shearingInfection of humans usually occurs due to inhalation of organisms attached to barnyard dust or dried fluids. The incubation period is from 14 to 22 days. Symptoms include: high fever; severe headache; general malaise, myalgia, chills or sweats, non-productive cough; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea; abdominal pain, chest pain. According to the Centers for Disease Control, if untreated, the fever can last from 9 to 14 days and from 30 to 50 percent of patients develop pneumonia. Although most people recover from acute Q Fever, there have been instances in which the condition has led to inflammation of the heart tissue or hepatitis. – For complete article see http://democratherald.com/news/local/three-cases-of-q-fever-confirmed-in-linn-benton-counties/article_05367872-12c3-11e4-8383-001a4bcf887a.html

Gray Wolf OR-7:

 

 

Two of OR-7's pups.

Two of OR-7′s pups.

Oregon 07/24/14 oregonlive.com: by Lynne Terry – Fresh photos snapped in the wilds of southern Oregon confirm that the state’s famous wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three mouths to feed. The images show two gray pups in about the same area where last month John Stephenson, a wolf coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, captured pictures of a black pup. Stephenson, who’s been monitoring feeds from OR-7′s radio collar, suspects the litter is even bigger. They usually range from four to six pups. . . . Biologists have a keen interest in OR-7. Born in the Imnaha pack in northeast Oregon, he spent three years searching for a mate in a journey that took him as far as California. The birth of the pups marks the first known wolf reproduction in the Oregon Cascades since the 1940s. OR-7′s mate, a small black female, was captured in the recent photos with a small white object in her mouth that looks as if she’s bringing a sandwich home to the kids. Stephenson said it’s most likely a bone, which wolves like to gnaw on, just like dogs. . . . The pups were born in April and now weigh about 30 pounds, Stephenson said. They’re increasingly mobile. So is OR-7, judging from his radio collar. – For complete article see http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/07/oregons_wolf_or-7_fresh_photos.html

Tularemia:

ColoradoWildRabbitNew Mexico 07/24/14 Bernalillo County: A 65-year-old woman hospitalized with tularemia has recovered. “Many areas of New Mexico experienced a significant increase in rabbit populations this year and some of those rabbits are dying from tularemia and from the plague, DOH Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Paul Ettestad said. A rabbit or rodent will die from tularemia in an area, then flies or ticks become infected from their bodies and pass it on to pets or people when they bite them, he said. People can contract tularemia by handling infected animal carcasses; being bitten by an infected tick. deerfly or other insect; and by eating or drinking contaminated food or water or by breathing in the bacteria. Dogs and cats usually are exposed to tularemia when they are allowed to roam and hunt sick rodents and rabbits or when bitten by an infected tick.” – See http://www.ruidosonews.com/ruidoso-news/ci_26210208/tularemia-case-reported

Hantavirus:

 

Deermouse.

Deermouse.

Colorado 07/24/14 Mesa County: Officials have confirmed that a boy who contracted hantavirus and was taken to a Denver hospital over the weekend is still being treated. – See http://kvnf.org/post/mesa-county-confirms-case-hantavirus

 

West Nile Virus (WNV):

fig2_lgArizona 07/25/14 Maricopa County: Officials have confirmed the first WNV-related fatality reported this year in a male in his early 60s with underlying medical issues.- See http://rt.com/usa/175416-first-west-nile-death-us/

Louisiana 07/25/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed four new human cases of WNV this week, bringing the year’s total to seven. The new cases are in East Baton Rouge, Caddo and Livingston parishes. (According to thenewsstar.com, the case in Caddo Parish proved fatal.) – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3073

Mississippi 07/28/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed one new human case of WNV in Rankin County. Hinds and Newton counties previously reported one human case of WNV each. – See http://www.msdh.state.ms.us/msdhsite/_static/23,15436,341.html

Rabies:

Billboard1-1South Carolina 07/25/14 Kershaw and Greenwood counties: A feral cat in Camden, Kershaw County, that tested positive for rabies exposed three people to the virus on July 21st and 22nd, and an unvaccinated family dog in Ware Shoals, Greenwood County, that tested positive to rabies on July 21st exposed six people to the virus. – See http://www.thestate.com/2014/07/25/3583702/cat-in-camden-dog-in-ware-shoals.html

 

NEBRASKA resident shoots stalking MOUNTAIN LION ~ WASHINGTON health officials asking people to send in TICKS ~ ARIZONA county finds this year’s first WEST NILE VIRUS mosquito ~ CDC publishes “Diagnosis and Management of Q FEVER” ~ RABIES reports from CO, GA, NY, & TXx2 ~ ANNOUNCEMENT: Three organizations accepting applications for AWARDS.

Mountain lion. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Mountain lion. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Nebraska 03/28/13 Dawes County: A resident of the Pine Ridge reported that he shot and killed a mountain lion on Wednesday after attempts to scare the animal off failed. The lion, which displayed no apparent fear, was walking along a creek about 20 yards from the man and about 150 yards from the man’s home. The incident occurred about 10 miles south of Chadron. – See http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-regional/nebraska/mountain-lion-killed-in-dawes-county/article_73019051-2f3b-533f-93ce-7e1406102683.html

Ticks:

Female Rocky Mountain Wood Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Female Rocky Mountain Wood Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Washington 03/27/13 coh.wa.gov: News ReleaseTick season is in full swing in western Washington, and it’s kicking into gear in the eastern side of the state. The Department of Health invites people all over the state to send ticks to the agency for a project to learn more about what types of ticks live in Washington. “Different types of ticks carry different diseases,” explains Liz Dykstra, public health entomologist for the Department of Health.

Female Western Black-legged Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Female Western Black-legged Tick. Courtesy CDC.

“We’re asking people to help us learn more by sending us ticks for identification so we understand the risks for disease in different areas.” Washington has relatively few cases of tick-borne disease, yet each year a few cases of relapsing fever, Lyme disease, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reported to state health officials. – For complete release see http://www.doh.wa.gov/Newsroom/2013NewsReleases/13037TickSeason.aspx

West Nile Virus (WNV):

080722_west_nile_generic (2)Arizona 03/28/13 Maricopa County: Officials confirm the first positive WNV mosquito sample, meaning the virus is getting an early start this year. Last year the county had 76 lab-confirmed human cases of WNV including two related fatalities. – See http://www.azfamily.com/news/health/Early-start-for-Maricopa-Countys-West-Nile-season-200430001.html

Q Fever:

qNational 03/29/13 cdc.gov: Q fever, a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii, can cause acute or chronic illness in humans. Transmission occurs primarily through inhalation of aerosols from contaminated soil or animal waste. No licensed vaccine is available in the United States. Because many human infections result in nonspecific or benign constitutional symptoms, establishing a diagnosis of Q fever often is challenging for clinicians. This report provides the first national recommendations issued by CDC for Q fever cdc_logorecognition, clinical and laboratory diagnosis, treatment, management, and reporting for health-care personnel and public health professionals. The guidelines address treatment of acute and chronic phases of Q fever illness in children, adults, and pregnant women, as well as management of occupational exposures. These recommendations will be reviewed approximately every 5 years and updated to include new published evidence. – See http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6203a1.htm?s_cid=rr6203a1_e

Rabies:

thumbnailCAAVQ16XskunkColorado 03/28/13 Weld County: A skunk found in a neighborhood south of Lee Lake in between Highway 257 and Weld County Road 76 in Windsor has tested positive for rabies. As the animal had bite marks officials are concerned that a domestic or some other wild animal may also be infected and spreading the virus through the area. – See http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20130328/NEWS01/303280028/Rabies-concerns-increase-second-skunk-found-near-Windsor

raccoon_lgGeorgia 03/27/13 Fayette County: A raccoon shot be a sheriff’s deputy off Padgett Road and Lone Oak Drive a short distance south of GA HWY 85 has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.thecitizen.com/articles/03-27-2013/rabies-confirmed-lone-oak-dr

2195804032_bb25565f77 - CopyNew York 03/27/13 Lewis County: A skunk in Lowville reported to be acting strangely has tested positive for rabies. An unvaccinated domestic animal that was in direct contact with the skunk had to be euthanized. – See http://www.wwnytv.com/news/local/Skunk-Tests-Positive-For-Rabies-In-Lewis-County-200227271.html

darlingcat-mattapoisett-Ma.govTexas 03/27/13 McLennan County: A feral cat that bit and scratched a Waco resident on March 24th in the 3700 block of South 3rd Street has tested positive for rabies. The cat was in the victim’s yard with her animals and when she tried to pick it up the cat became very aggressive. – See http://www.kcentv.com/story/21811264/cat-attacks-woman-tests-positive-for-rabies-in

2048273681_e5422b11e6 - CopyTexas 03/28/13 McLennan County: A skunk found with two dogs by a property owner in the 16000 block of Wortham Bend Road in Waco earlier this week has tested positive for rabies. This is the second confirmed rabies infection in the county this year. – See http://www.wacotrib.com/news/environment/second-rabies-case-confirmed-in-waco-area/article_94b842af-c4d0-5717-833c-767794f97e3d.html

~ AWARDS ANNOUNCEMENT ~

We would like to inform you that the following three awards are currently open for applications. If you are interested, you should apply directly to the organisation involved. We hope you find the information useful.

frontpage_logo1. Rabies in the Americas Award: GARC is pleased to announce that applications are welcomed from students in Asia and Africa for financial support to attend the 24th annual Rabies in the Americas (RITA) meeting in October 2013. Deadline: July 12th, 2013. For more details, see http://rabiescontrol.net/news/news-archive/announcing-financial-support-award-for-a-student-to-attend-rita.html

amv2. World Veterinary Day Award, offered by the World Veterinary Association (WVA) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). This recognises the most successful celebration of the veterinary profession. It applies to national veterinary associations, either on their own, or in collaboration with other selected veterinary bodies. This year’s theme is ‘Vaccination’. Deadline: May 1st, 2013. For further details, see http://www.worldvet.org/taxonomy/term/38

ACCD_LogoCMYK_color_medium3. Alliance for Contraception in Cats & Dogs: Award to attend the 5th International Symposium on Non-Surgical Contraceptive Methods of Pet Population Control in Oregon, US. This is open to veterinary students, interns and residents currently enrolled in a college or school of veterinary medicine anywhere in the world. Deadline: April 6, 2013. For more details -http://www.acc-d.org/5th%20Symp-Student%20Contest

Don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter for the latest news, campaign information and updates on projects from our community around the world – http://www.rabiescontrol.net/support-us/sign-up-to-our-newsletter.html.

Warm regards,

garcThe Global Alliance for Rabies Control Campaigns Team

www.rabiesalliance.org

EQUINE WEST NILE VIRUS cases now at 518 nationally ~ COYOTE report from ILLINOIS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from GA, IL, OK, & SC ~ RABIES report from GEORGIA ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending October 13, 2012.

Feral horse and foal. Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, Montana. Courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

National 10/18/12 dvm360.com: by Heather Biele, DVM – In early September, 187 cases of equine West Nile virus were reported nationwide, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s disease maps. Now, just one month later, that number has soared to 518, according to a report posted on October 16. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) released a similar report in early October showing that the mosquito-borne virus is a much greater problem this year, having far surpassed 2011′s report of 87 cases. The USDA states, however, that while this number is higher than the number of cases identified last year, it’s very similar to the number of cases reported to officials years prior.

Amy Glaser, DVM, PhD, a West Nile virus expert and senior research associate at the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, isn’t surprised by these numbers and actually expects a peak in caseload around this time each year. “Traditionally, the largest volume for equine West Nile virus occurs in September and October, right up until the first frost,” she says. “That typically represents the peak of cases we see during any particular epizootic year.”

At this time, only seven states remain free of the virus—Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, New Hampshire and West Virginia (Alaska and Hawaii have never reported West Nile virus). As of October 16, Texas holds the highest number of cases with 83, and Louisiana and Pennsylvania are close behind with 50 and 46, respectively. – For complete article see http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+Equine/Equine-West-Nile-virus-cases-almost-triple-in-past/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/793412?contextCategoryId=378

Coyote Attacks:

Illinois 10/19/12 Cook and Lake counties: A pair of coyotes attacked a dog on Thursday being walked by its owner in Buffalo Grove’s Mike Rylko Community Park. A park representative said signs have been posted advising people to remain on trails and to keep their dogs leashed. – See http://buffalogrove.patch.com/articles/park-district-warns-of-coyotes-near-buffalo-grove-park

West Nile Virus (WNV):

Georgia 10/18/12 Houston County: Family members have confirmed that 65-year-old Charles Hendrix of Warner Robins has died of WNV after a long battle with the virus. – See http://www.41nbc.com/news/local-news/15764-houston-county-man-infected-with-west-nile-virus-dies

Illinois 10/18/12 idph.state.il.us: Update – State health officials have confirmed 211 human cases of WNV in the state so far this year, including 9 fatalities. For additional statistics see http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/wnvglance12.htm

Oklahoma 10/18/12 Pontotoc County: Health officials confirmed today that a county man older than 65 is the 12th person to die from WNV in the state this year. – http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=17&articleid=20121018_17_0_OKLAHO422102

South Carolina 10/17/12 greenvilleonline.com: State health officials have confirmed the number of WNV-related fatalities in the state so far this year now totals three, and there have been a total of 40 human cases of the virus reported this year, which is about 700% above the typical figure of 3 to 5 cases per year. – See http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20121017/NEWS/310170071/Three-dead-state-from-West-Nile-virus?odyssey=nav|head

Rabies:

Georgia 10/18/12 Forsyth County: A fox suspected of having rabies attacked a man and bit two dogs, authorities reported Thursday. Local officers are warning residents to be on the lookout for the fox in and near the Hampton subdivision, located off GA 400 as it remains on the loose. – See http://cumming.patch.com/articles/possibly-rabid-fox-attacks-man-dogs-in-north-forsyth

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending October 13, 2012:

Published October 19, 2012/ 61(41); ND-565-ND-578

Anaplasmosis . . . 10 . . . New York (9), North Carolina,

Babesiosis . . . 4 . . . New York (4),

Giardiasis . . . 127 . . . Alabama (3), Alaska (2), Arizona, Arkansas (4), California (27), Delaware, Florida (22), Iowa (2), Maryland (3), Michigan (2), Missouri (2), New York (17), Ohio (9), Oregon, Pennsylvania (5), Vermont (4), Virginia (3), Washington (15), Wisconsin (2), Wyoming,

Hansen Disease (Leprosy) . . . 1 . . . California, 

Lyme Disease . . .  75. . .  Florida (2), Maine (2), Maryland (6), New Hampshire, New York (37), North Carolina (3), Ohio, Pennsylvania (21), Virginia, Wyoming,

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 1 . . . Michigan,  

Rabies (Animal) . . . 56. . . Kansas (2), Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri (2), Nevada (2), New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York (4), Ohio, Oklahoma (7), Texas (26), Vermont, Virginia (7),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 1. . . North Carolina,  

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 15 . . . Arkansas (2), North Carolina (8), Tennessee (3), Virginia (2).

EHD virus in ILLINOIS may have killed more than 2,000 DEER ~ CALIFORNIA confirms GROUND SQUIRREL positive for BUBONIC PLAGUE ~ Scientists say LYME DISEASE will continue to spread ~ MOUNTAIN LION report from IDAHO ~ COYOTE reports from CA, FL, & ILx2 ~ EEE/WNV report from CAx2, CO, FL, LA, & VT ~ RABIES reports from TN, TX, & VA ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending September 29, 2012.

Whitetail Buck. Courtesy of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Illinois 10/05/12 dnr.illinois.gov: News Release – State officials today announced updated results of monitoring of deer mortality in the state attributed to Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD).  Since an earlier update on September 6, many Illinois citizens have taken the time to make reports of sick, dead, and/or dying animals throughout the state. The IDNR Division of Wildlife Resources thanks those individuals who have taken time to provide information on EHD-probable deer mortality in the state. As of September 30, there were 2,043 deer reported as probable EHD deaths, with reports from 76 counties.  The highest numbers were reported from Cook (326); Calhoun (181); Coles (138); Macon and Shelby (121). Hunters taking to the field in Illinois for archery deer hunting and the Oct. 6-7 Illinois Youth Firearm Deer Hunt need not be concerned about eating venison from animals that may have contracted EHD and survived.  EHD has no impact on humans, pets, or livestock. – For complete news release and county maps see http://www.dnr.illinois.gov/news/Pages/EpizooticHemorrhagicDisease%28EHD%29IllinoisUpdate.aspx

Bubonic Plague:

Ground squirrel. Courtesy National Park Service.

California 10/05/12 inlandnewstoday.com: For the first time in nearly a decade, bubonic plague has been confirmed in Riverside County.  State health officials said Thursday that a ground squirrel tested positive. It was found during routine testing at the Fern Basin campground in the San Jacinto Mountains north of Idyllwild. It’s an area where similar findings were an annual occurrence in the 1990’s. Bubonic plague is a bacterial disease that can be transmitted from wild rodents to humans through bites from infected fleas. Campers are being warned to stay away from squirrels and other wild animals.

Lyme Disease:

National 10/05/12 petsandparasites.org: by Dr. Chris Carpenter – The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) 2012 Fall Lyme Disease Forecast calls for increased risk in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region, the upper Midwest, the Southeastern United States and all along the West Coast. The disease incidence is steadily spreading southward, even into some areas traditionally free or with low incidence of Lyme disease such as the Midwest and parts of the Southeast. The Northeast continues as the most Lyme endemic region of the country. – For complete article see http://www.petsandparasites.org/about-capc/

Mountain Lion Sightings:

Idaho 10/05/12 Ada County: A Boise police bicycle officer saw a mountain lion at about 9:30 a.m. Friday, according to a release from the police department. The cat was spotted beyond 31st and Pleasanton streets in a remote gravel area. The animal fled the area, and officers were unable to locate it. Police are consulting with Idaho Fish & Game officials. The Friday morning sighting was the fifth since Wednesday. – See http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/10/05/2718042/cougar-sighting-friday-morning.html

Coyote Attacks:

California 10/05/12 Orange County: A Tustin family says their small dog was fatally injured by a coyote in their Laurelwood neighborhood front yard last month. So far this year, local police have reported 13 coyote sightings near Bryan Avenue and Jamboree Road, about 2 miles from Laurelwood. – See http://www.ocregister.com/news/coyote-373645-coyotes-residents.html

Florida 10/05/12 Orange County: Residents in Dr. Phillips are petitioning to have coyotes removed after several family pets were killed. They say sightings occur on a daily basis and their afraid to allow pets, or even small children, out of their sight. – See http://www.cfnews13.com/content/news/cfnews13/news/article.html/content/news/articles/cfn/2012/10/5/neighbors_start_peti.html

Illinois 10/05/12 DuPage County: Local police report two small dogs survived a coyote attack on September 27th in the 2000 block of Stonebridge Court in Wheaton. One dog was treated for four bites on the neck and face. – See http://wheaton.patch.com/articles/dogs-survive-coyote-attack-in-wheaton

Illinois 10/05/12 DuPage County: A Winfield family says their dog, a Yorkshire terrier, was fatally injured by a coyote in their yard adjacent to the Illinois Prairie Path on Wednesday. – See http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/local&id=8837288

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) & West Nile Virus (WNV):

California 10/06/12 Shasta County: Health officials have confirmed the county’s first human case of WNV this year. This person is the 217th human case of WNV in the state this year. – See http://anewscafe.com/2012/10/06/first-human-west-nile-virus-infection-of-2012-identified-in-shasta-county/

California 10/05/12 Merced County: Health officials confirm that a 26-year-old woman from Gustine has presented the first human case of WNV in the city this year. – See http://www.westsideconnect.com/2012/10/05/human-case-of-west-nile-in-gustine-2/

Colorado 10/05/12 Pueblo County: Health officials have confirmed one human case of WNV in the city of Pueblo, and suspects another. – See http://www.chieftain.com/news/local/puebloan-contracts-west-nile-virus/article_5bb26fc6-0f46-11e2-b001-001a4bcf887a.html

Florida 10/05/12 Jackson County: Health officials have reported a human case of WNV in the county, and a horse stabled on Sellers Road between Malone and Campbellton has tested positive for EEE. – See http://www2.jcfloridan.com/news/2012/oct/05/west-nile-eee-reported-jackson-county-ar-4693739/

Louisiana 10/05/12 dhh.louisiana.gov: Update – State health officials have confirmed 25 new human cases of WNV, but not new deaths occurred this week. So far this year, 305 human cases of WNV have been reported, including 11 WNV-related deaths. – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/2651

Vermont 10/06/12 Essex County: Health officials have confirmed that a second person in the state has been infected with WNV and is recovering. – See http://www.reformer.com/latestnews/ci_21711420/second-case-west-nile-identified-vermont

Rabies:

Tennessee 10/05/12 tnpublichealth: State health officials are currently distributing oral rabies vaccine packets in eight northeast counties to prevent the spread of rabies in raccoons. The air drops began Tuesday and will continue through Oct. 12th.

Texas 10/05/12 Wichita County: Two skunks found near Wichita Falls, one southwest of the city and the other southeast, have tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2012/oct/05/skunks-near-city-positive-rabies/

Virginia 10/04/12 Virginia Beach: A fox that attacked four people on Border Way off Salem Road has tested positive for rabies. – See video report at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjTzOY28pqg

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending September 29, 2012:

Published October 5, 2012/ 61(39); ND-536-ND-549

Anaplasmosis . . . 1 . . . New York,

Babesiosis . . . 4 . . . California, New York (3),

Brucellosis . . . 2 . . . California (2),    

Ehrlichiosis . . . 8 . . . North Carolina (7), Tennessee,

Giardiasis . . . 167 . . . Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas (5), California (20), Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho (2), Iowa (3), Maine, Maryland (5), Massachusetts (7), Michigan (4), Missouri (7), Nebraska (5), New York (55), Ohio (21), Oregon (4), Pennsylvania (6), Vermont, Virginia, Washington (15), Wisconsin,

Lyme Disease . . .  161. . .  California, Delaware (4), Maine (3), Maryland (25), New Hampshire, New York (72), North Carolina (11), Pennsylvania (32), Vermont (5), Virginia (7),

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 2 . . . North Carolina (2), 

Rabies (Animal) . . . 46. . . Idaho (5), Kansas (2), Missouri, New Hampshire, New York (8), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (6), Rhode Island, Vermont (2), Virginia (17),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 2. . . Maryland, Missouri

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 43 . . . Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana (2), Kentucky (3), Missouri (2), North Carolina (21), Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee (8), Virginia (3),

Tularemia . . . 1 . . . Missouri.

CANADA: GRIZZLY kills ALBERTA hiker’s leashed DOG ~ MOUNTAIN LION report from MONTANA ~ EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS & WEST NILE VIRUS reports from AL, IA, LA, & MS ~ RABIES report from NJ ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending September 22, 2012.

Grizzly. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Canada:

Alberta 09/28/12 the province.com: A popular hiking area in Banff National Park has been closed after a grizzly bear attacked and killed a small dog. Parks Canada spokeswoman Brianna Burley said it happened in the Skoki Valley area, near the Lake Louise ski hill, on Thursday. A hiker was scrambling off the trail with his Jack Russell terrier when the adult grizzly approached and started stalking the pet. “At first the hiker tried to stand his ground against the grizzly bear, and then came to a realization that the bear was intent on getting the dog,” Burley said Friday. The man tried to scare off the animal by yelling, throwing rocks and his backpack at it, but the grizzly wasn’t backing off, Burley said. “At this point he dropped the leash and the dog ran away about 20 feet at which point the bear chased the dog and that’s where the bear overtook the dog.” The grizzly left the area, taking the dog’s body. The hiker, an employee of Skoki Lodge, was not hurt but was shaken. – For complete article see http://www.theprovince.com/travel/Trails+closed+after+grizzly+bear+attacks+kills+small+Banff/7317499/story.html

Mountain Lion Sightings:

Montana 09/29/12 Lewis & Clark County: On Saturday afternoon, a resident of the South Hills area of Helena alerted authorities that they spotted a mountain lion near the intersection of Lodgepole and Lime Kiln, near Mount Ascension Park. – See http://www.kxlh.com/news/mountain-lion-spotted-in-helena-south-hills-area/

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) & West Nile Virus (WNV):

Alabama 09/28/12 Mobile County: According to local health officials, a sentinel chicken in Grand Bay has tested positive for EEE. – See http://blog.al.com/live/2012/09/sentinel_chicken_in_grand_bay.html

Iowa 09/28/12 idph.state.ia.us: News Release – The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and Iowa Department of Public Health today reminded Iowans that mosquitoes remain active until hard freeze occurs and can carry WNV. Surveillance has shown a larger number of horses have been infected with WNV this year, with more than 20 confirmed cases. In addition, 19 human cases of WNV have been reported in 16 counties in 2012. No WNV-related deaths have been reported this year. Humans cannot ‘catch’ WNV from an animal, but an increase in animal cases indicates higher activity among mosquitoes carrying the virus. – See http://www.idph.state.ia.us/IdphNews/Reader.aspx?id=8225EBD7-3840-4A3A-9783-96313D26A376

Louisiana 09/28/12 dhh.louisiana.gov: Update – State health officials today confirmed 29 new human cases of WNV this week and no new deaths, and reminded residents to continue taking precautions against mosquito bites so they can lower their risk of infection. The state is seeing the highest number of reported WNV infections in several years, with 280 cases and 11 deaths from the disease thus far in 2012. – For details and county involved see http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/2646

Mississippi 09/27/12 msdh.ms.gov: Update – State health officials confirm there have been 26 new human cases of WNV in the past week. The number of human cases now confirmed totals 197, including 5 deaths. – For details and county information see http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/14,0,93,554.html

Rabies:

New Jersey 09/29/12 Somerset County: A grounded bat found outside 422 Brookside Lane in Hillsborough less than a mile from the Middle School has tested positive for rabies. Parents of area school children are urged to contact health or school officials if their children touched the bat. Several children were seen near the bat poking it with a stick. – see http://hillsborough.patch.com/articles/rabid-bat-found-on-brookside-lane-sidewalk

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending September 22, 2012:

Published September 28, 2012/ 61(38); ND-522-ND-535

Anaplasmosis . . . 7 . . . New York (7),

Babesiosis . . . 3 . . . Maryland, New York (2),

Brucellosis . . . 1 . . . Indiana,     

Ehrlichiosis . . . 4 . . . Florida, Maryland (2), Virginia,

Giardiasis . . . 194 . . . Alabama (6), Alaska (2), Arkansas (3), Florida (31), Idaho (6), Iowa (3), Maryland (6), Michigan (3), Missouri (4), Montana, Nebraska (8), Nevada, New York (49), Ohio (20), Oregon (5), Pennsylvania (8), South Carolina (2), Vermont, Virginia (2), Washington (29), Wisconsin (2), Wyoming (2),

Hansen Disease (Leprosy) . . . 1 . . . Missouri, 

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 3 . . . Indiana (3),

Lyme Disease . . .  173. . .  Connecticut, Delaware (5), Florida (4), Maryland (6), Michigan, New York (82), Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania (44), Tennessee (2), Virginia (24), Washington (2),

Q Fever (Chronic) . . . 2 . . . Missouri, Nebraska

Rabies (Animal) . . . 63. . . Arkansas (3), Idaho (14), Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland (7), Michigan (4), Missouri (2), New York (10), Texas (9), Virginia (11), West Virginia,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 5. . . Missouri (3), North Carolina (2),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 39 . . . Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas (4), Florida, Indiana, Missouri (5), North Carolina (11), Ohio, Pennsylvania (2), Rhode Island, Tennessee (5), Virginia (6),

Tularemia . . . 1 . . . Missouri.

Lone WOLF OR-7 at last report still in CALIFORNIA ~ WASHINGTON to kill pack of GRAY WOLVES ~ GEESE may have key to treating diseases from MALARIA to WEST NILE VIRUS ~ RABIES reports from FL, & MT ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending September 15, 2012.

Gray wolf. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Follow-Up Report:

California 09/22/12 redbluffdailynews.com: by Julie Zeeb – The famous Oregonian that waltzed into California in December 2011 and has been border-hoping ever since is back in Tehama County. The gray wolf, known as OR-7, has mostly been in California the last few months, primarily in Plumas County, according to a California Department of Fish and Game blog dedicated to his comings and goings. The three-year-old wolf was last in Tehama County on July 31 and except for one day spent in Butte County has been in various areas of Plumas County, moving from the western area of the county into Tehama County on Sept. 19*. OR-7 is the first and only wolf to have been sighted in California since 1924, first visiting Tehama County for a few days on July 21.

*Author’s Note: According to the latest California Department of Fish & Game satellite reading, OR-7 was in eastern Tehama County on September 20, 2012.

Washington 09/21/12 seattletimes.com: by Shannon Dininny – Washington officials announced plans Friday to kill a pack of at least eight gray wolves that have been attacking livestock in the state’s northeast corner. The move is likely to anger some conservation groups and deal a setback to wolf recovery efforts, though state officials said the step was necessary for sustainable, long-term wolf recovery in the region. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said two teams were in the field Friday to try to kill members of the Wedge Pack, which ranges over a remote area of northern Stevens County. Marksmen would hunt the wolves from the ground, and if those efforts were unsuccessful, they might use helicopters to aid their hunt, Director Phil Anderson said in a statement. The pack is believed to have killed or injured at least 15 cattle from the Diamond M herd that grazes in a large area near the Canadian border, according to the statement. Those attacks have become increasingly more frequent since July, even after the agency killed a non-breeding member of the pack in August, and experts believe the wolves have become dependent on cattle for food. – For complete article see http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2019227092_apwawashingtonwolves1stldwritethru.html

Research & Development:

Global 09/21/12 wdtn.com: by Neil Carlson – Sometimes we find the cure for disease where we’d least expect it. In this case, geese could hold the key to treating everything from malaria to rabies. It all started out as a research project to develop a serum to protect people from a pesky outdoor nuisance and the disease it can carry: the West Nile virus. Mosquitoes can pick up the virus from diseased birds and transfer it to humans. Researchers found that geese can rapidly produce the antibodies needed to create serums to treat people for West Nile disease.

But, what’s most amazing is that researchers found geese can be used to produce serums to treat all kinds of diseases. “And we have gone into researching its use of their antibodies for dengue fever, for pandemic influenza, malaria, rabies,” said Richard Glynn, researcher with Avianax. “We’re also working with a group on cancer.” Researchers introduce the dead virus of any given disease to a goose. The goose then quickly produces an antibody to that disease, which is extracted from its egg yolk and used to create the serum to treat that disease.

David Bradley, University of North Dakota

“What’s really exciting about this is the goose provides a platform and produces antibodies rapidly to a variety of viruses — probably toxins, maybe even cancers,” said medical student David Bradley. It’s all amazing, heady stuff that’s being reviewed by the FDA. Who knows? We may all find that one day geese are the answer to many of mankind’s medical problems. All of this still depends on approval for human use by the FDA. However, the government is interested in this research because it could be used to quickly develop vaccines for biological agents spread by terrorists.

Rabies:

Florida 09/21/12 Bay County: A raccoon killed at the intersection of N. 9th Plaza and Lake Drive in Parker has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wmbb.com/story/19605639/rabid-raccoon-found-in-parker

Montana 09/21/12 Gallatin County: A Bozeman family is looking for the owner of a border collie involved in a biting incident at 4:40 p.m. Wednesday at the East Gallatin Recreational Area. Walker VanHouten, 16, was running with the Bozeman Hawks cross-country team when a border collie bit him on his calf. VanHouten did not realize he should check with the owner for proof of rabies vaccination. VanHouten will have to go through rabies injections if the dog owner does not come forward by Tuesday. The dog owner should contact Kathleen VanHouten at 585-7944 or vanhoutens3@wispwest.net.

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending September 15, 2012:

Published September 21, 2012/ 61(37); ND-508-ND-521

Anaplasmosis . . . 23 . . . Florida, Maine (2), New York (15), North Carolina (4), Rhode Island,

Babesiosis . . . 8 . . . New York (8),

Brucellosis . . . 1 . . . California,     

Ehrlichiosis . . . 14 . . . Maine, North Carolina (11), Tennessee, Virginia,

Giardiasis . . . 218 . . . Alabama (2), Alaska (2), Arkansas (3), California (42), Delaware, Florida (22), Idaho (3), Iowa (3), Maine (8), Maryland (8), Michigan (3), Missouri (3), Montana, Nebraska (6), Nevada, New York (47), Ohio (19), Oregon (6), Pennsylvania (13), South Carolina (5), Vermont (7), Washington (9), Wisconsin, Virginia (3),

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 1 . . . Indiana,

Lyme Disease . . .  156. . .  Florida (6), Maine, Maryland (18), Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey (2), New York (67), Ohio (2), Pennsylvania (38), Rhode Island (3), Texas (2), Vermont (4), Virginia (10), Washington,

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 5 . . . Alaska, Nebraska (2), New York, Ohio

Rabies (Animal) . . . 49. . . Maine (2), Nevada (3), New York (16), Ohio, Texas, Utah (2), Vermont (2), Virginia (21), West Virginia,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 1. . . Ohio,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 42 . . . Alabama (3), Florida, Indiana (3), New York, North Carolina (18), Tennessee (9), Virginia (7),

Tularemia . . . 1 . . . Nebraska.

OHIO reports first known H3N2v SWINE FLU related DEATH ~ CALIFORNIA reports MOUNTAIN LION sighting ~ WEST NILE VIRUS report from MASSACHUSETTS ~ RABIES reports from FL, GA, MA, NJ, RI, & WI ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending August 25, 2012.

Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Ohio 09/01/12 newsnet5.com: by Cassandra Nist – The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) has reported Ohio’s first known H3N2v- associated death Friday. The individual had direct contact with swine at the Ross County Fair before coming ill. Click here for a complete list of Ohio’s county fairs. The 61-year-old female Madison County resident passed away earlier this week. Testing at the Ohio Department of Health Laboratory confirmed that the individual had been infected with the H3N2v influenza virus. The patient had multiple other underlying medical conditions, but the influenza virus may have contributed to the death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the main risk factor for infection is direct exposure to swine. CDC points out that the virus does not spread easily from person-to-person, but limited human-to-human infection has occurred. “H3N2v, like many other viruses, has the greatest potential to impact those with weakened immune systems,” said Dr. Ted Wymyslo, Director of ODH. “We have been seeing a mild illness in most individuals infected with the H3N2v virus, so there’s no need for alarm. However, it is important for those at-risk individuals to take extra precautions like avoiding swine exhibits to protect themselves.” Ohio is currently reporting 102 cases of H3N2v statewide. Those with confirmed cases of H3N2v are between the ages of 6 months and 61 years old. Most ill individuals have recovered on their own or were treated and released after a short stay in the hospital. – For complete article see http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/oh_cuyahoga/one-person-has-died-from-h3n2v-after-attending-ross-county-fair

Author’s Note: According to The New York Times, “Most cases have been in Ohio and Indiana,” but other cases have been confirmed as far away as Maine and Hawaii.  For a state-by-state breakdown of the 301 cases reported since August 2011 see http://www.cdc.gov/flu/swineflu/h3n2v-case-count.htm

Mountain Lion Sightings:

California 08/31/12 Sebastopol, Sonoma County: A mountain lion sighting south of town on Friday follows at least two possible sightings reported earlier in the spring near the downtown area. The most recent report involves a woman who said she saw what appeared to be a lion in an open field near Elphick and Bollinger avenues. – See http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20120831/ARTICLES/120839883

West Nile Virus (WNV):

Massachusetts 09/01/12 Middlesex and Hampden counties: Four more human cases of the WNV have been confirmed, bringing the total to eight in the state this season, health officials said Friday night. Three residents in Middlesex County and one in Hampden County, who were listed as probable cases earlier, were confirmed with the illness and all patients were recovering, officials said. – See http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2012/09/01/four_more_west_nile_virus_cases_confirmed_in_state/

Rabies:

Florida 08/31/12 Auburndale, Polk County: A bat found in Tenoroc High has tested positive for rabies, officials said. This is the seventh confirmed case of rabies this year in the county. See http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2012/8/31/bat_found_in_tenoroc.html

Georgia 08/31/12 Madison County: Three rabies cases have been confirmed in the county within the past week, county leaders said Friday. Two of the cases involved skunks at locations on Applebaum Way and Charles Hart Road in the Colbert area. In both cases, the skunks had been killed by local residents and turned over to animal control. The third case involved a deceased horse in the area of Friendship Church Road and Chandler Road. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/5464-Three-rabies-cases-confirmed-in-Madison-County.html

Massachusetts 08/31/12 Hingham, Plymouth County: An 11-year-old Hingham boy, who lives on the 100 block of lower Main Street, was bitten in his yard late afternoon on Monday, Aug. 27, by a cat.  The cat’s teeth punctured his skin, which requires determining the cat’s rabies vaccination status. No one is looking to punish the cat or its owners, but rather to find out its rabies status to determine whether they boy will need a series of rabies treatments.  The cat is not a complete stranger as he visits the boy’s yard from time to time, but not frequently. The cat appears to be well fed and cared for, but does not wear a collar.  He is mostly orange with some white stripes on his body, on his tail, and white on his paws.  The cat does not belong to any of the boy’s immediate neighbors. It is imperative to find out who owns the cat and its vaccination status.  Per the State Board of Health, there is a 10-day window of opportunity from this past Monday to find the cat before the boy must begin the rabies series. Anyone who owns this cat or knows of someone that owns this cat can contact Leslie Badger, Hingham Animal Control Officer, at 781-741-1490, or Marisa Ronan at 781-749-1862.

New Jersey 08/31/12 Hillsborough, Somerset County:  Health officials say there have been an unusual number of animals that have tested positive for rabies between Aug. 15 and 20.  A rabid skunk was found on Brook Drive on Aug. 15. Another rabid skunk was found at the Royce Brook Golf Course on Aug. 20. There was also a rabid cat behind the Goodyear on Route 206 on Aug. 20 (this was a young cat which was white with patches of tiger markings, with short hair.) – See http://www.centraljersey.com/articles/2012/08/31/hillsborough_beacon/news/doc50411ffa53a6a408491769.txt

Rhode Island 08/31/12 Barrington, Bristol County: A raccoon that bit the finger of a 4-year-old girl in her family’s garage has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.eastbayri.com/news/2012/aug/31/rabid-raccoon-bites-young-barrington-girl/

Wisconsin 08/31/12: The Eau Claire City-County Health Department is looking for two dogs involved with different biting events. The department is looking for a dog that bit a woman at the corner of Washington Street and State Street Thursday at about 5 p.m. The dog is described as a large sized Husky type dog, black and white in color. The woman walking with the dog was dressed in green shorts and a purple tee-shirt. The Health Department is urgently requesting health and rabies status of this dog.

The department is also looking for a dog that bit a child near the beach access to Elk Creek on Friday, Aug. 24. The dog is described as a large bulldog-type snub-nosed breed dog. The dog was with a younger couple with three other dogs. All had collars and tags. The dogs were called Jasper, Jackie, Melon and Sophie. The health and rabies status of the dog needs to be determined. If anyone has information about these two dogs, they should contact the Eau Claire Communications Center at 715-839-4972.

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending August 25, 2012:

Published August 31, 2012/ 61(34); ND-466-ND-479

Anaplasmosis . . . 23 . . . Arkansas, New Hampshire, New York (13), North Carolina, Rhode Island (6), Virginia,

Babesiosis . . . 3 . . . New York (3),

Brucellosis . . . 1 . . . Maryland,     

Ehrlichiosis . . . 13 . . . Arkansas, Delaware, North Carolina (8), Tennessee (2), Virginia,

Giardiasis . . . 183 . . . Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas (6), California (22), Florida (26), Hawaii, Idaho (3), Iowa (6), Maine, Maryland (2), Massachusetts (9), Michigan (7), Missouri (5), Montana, Nebraska (9), Nevada (2), New York (31), Ohio (19), Oregon (4), Pennsylvania (9), South Carolina (3), Vermont (3), Virginia (4), Washington (7), Wisconsin,

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 1 . . . Indiana,

Lyme Disease . . .  163. . .  California, Connecticut, Delaware (5), Florida, Idaho, Maryland (9), Michigan (2), New York (74), North Carolina (9), Ohio, Pennsylvania (44), Vermont (2), Virginia (13),

Q Fever (Chronic) . . . 1 . . . Maryland, 

Rabies (Animal) . . . 47. . . Illinois (4), Kansas (2), Kentucky, Maine (3), Nevada, New Hampshire, New York (10), Ohio (2), Texas (3), Vermont (3), Virginia (17),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 34 . . . Arkansas (14), Florida (2), Maryland, Nebraska, South Carolina (2), Tennessee (11), Virginia (3),

Tularemia . . . 1 . . . Washington.