FOLLOW-UP REPORTS: Celebrity WOLF OR-7 returns to OREGON without an Oscar ~ ILLINOIS city issues COYOTE warning ~ ARIZONA reports rapid rise of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER ~ CANADA: YUKON xcountry ski club warns of WOLVES ~ RABIES reports from SOUTH CAROLINA, TEXAS, & VIRGINIA ~ BOOK REVIEW: Out of the Woods: Healing from LYME DISEASE and other Chronic Illness ~ CDC Reports: Results of CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE study.

Gray Wolf. Courtesy National Park Service.

Follow-Up Reports:

(For previous reports on this topic use search term OR-7)

Oregon 03/02/12 or.gov: News Release – Wolf OR-7 was located in Oregon for the first time since late December at noon yesterday, March 1. As of midnight last night, OR-7 was in Jackson County, Oregon. OR-7 had been in northern Siskiyou County, California, less than 10 miles from the Oregon-California border, for the past 12 days. While OR-7 crossed a state boundary yesterday, his movement was small (about 30 miles). “While wolves crossing state boundaries may be significant for people, wolves and other wildlife don’t pay attention to state borders,” said Russ Morgan, ODFW wolf coordinator. “It’s possible OR-7 will cross back into California and be using areas in both states. ODFW will continue to monitor his location and coordinate with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and California Fish and Game.” While OR-7 is west of Highways 395-78-95 in Oregon, he remains protected by both the federal and state Endangered Species Acts.

OR-7 left the Imnaha pack in September 2011 and went through Baker, Grant, Lake, Crook, Harney, Deschutes, Klamath and Jackson counties before entering California Dec. 28, 2011. While in California, he travelled through eastern Siskiyou County, northeastern Shasta County and then resided in Lassen County for a few weeks. On Feb. 11 he re-entered Shasta County and then, about a week later, he crossed north into Siskiyou County. California Fish and Game has been updating his status on the website  www.dfg.ca.gov/wolf/ For more information on wolves in Oregon visit http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wolves/

Illinois 02/29/12 suntimes.com: The city issued a warning for residents Thursday — be on the lookout for coyotes. City officials said they have received 25 calls from residents since the beginning of the year reporting coyote sightings in residential areas. There has been a large increase in the coyote population in Illinois in the past two decades, especially in the Chicago area, city officials note. In Aurora, reported coyote sightings so far this year are on track to exceed 2011 when Animal Control fielded 53 such calls, officials said. Sightings have been reported on the city’s far southeast side where homes are adjacent to rural or wooded areas, and on the West Side. Animal Control officials said the increased sightings are not unusual at this time of year because the coyotes’ mating cycles result in younger animals leaving their family territories and venturing out on their own. Coyotes are mainly nocturnal animals but may be more visible during the daytime in spring and summer. While most coyotes are leery of people and tend to stay clear of humans, they can still be a danger, especially to young children, Animal Control officials warn. It is not unusual for coyotes to attack dogs and other pets. The most effective way to prevent attacks is to eliminate feeding coyotes either intentionally or accidentally. Coyotes can be attracted to bird and squirrel feeders, bread that is fed to ducks and geese, pet food that is left outside, and other unintentional food sources. When coyotes find these types of food in residential areas, they may lose their fear of humans and eventually test both people and pets as possible prey, officials said. Anyone approached by a coyote should yell, wave their arms, or throw an object at the coyote — but should never run away. Family pets like dogs and cats — especially small pets — should not be left unwatched while outside.  Residents who are attacked by a coyote, or who have a pet that is attacked, should contact Aurora Animal Control at 630-256-3630.

Brown Dog Tick.

Arizona 02/29/12 cronkitenewsonline.com: by Brittany Smith – Reported Arizona cases of a potentially fatal disease spread by ticks have increased steadily over the past decade and spiked within the last two years. With temperatures warming, state and federal officials say those heading into the outdoors should be aware of the danger. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is an infection that in Arizona is spread primarily by the common brown dog tick, which is common in higher elevations. The ticks often attach to dogs and can then move over to people. Will Humble, director of the state Department of Health Services, said Arizonans need to manage their pets in the outdoors to keep the disease from spreading. “If everyone used tick collars on their dogs, I think we’d have a lot fewer cases,” Humble said. “People may not realize that if they take their Phoenix dog to the high mountain they need to use a tick collar.”

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever petechial rash

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever first appeared on the department’s radar in 2002. Since then, the number of reported cases in the state has steadily increased, with 23 cases reported in 2009 and 52 cases in 2011. There was one known death in 2009 and five known deaths in 2011, according to the state health department. Most cases have been in eastern Arizona, but Humble said there are now cases being reported in southern Arizona. – For complete article see http://cronkitenewsonline.com/2012/02/rise-of-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-has-officials-urging-caution-outdoors/

Canada:

Yukon 03/02/12 cbc.ca: The Whitehorse Cross Country Ski Club has posted “wolves in the area” signs for the first time ever after some unusual encounters between wolves and skiers on a couple of the trails. The operations manager for the ski trails, Mike Gladish, says it’s not unusual for wolves to be on the trails. He often sees their tracks. “But there were a couple of sightings last week where one skier had an encounter with two wolves that kind of stood their ground and then we had another skier notice a wolf behind her for a couple of kilometres.” Gladish said the encounters were on the Pierre Harvey Loop and the 10 K. Robyn Dunfield regularly skis at Mount MacIntyre, towing her two children. The youngest is just four months old. She said she is now sticking to a well-travelled route close to the chalet. “It makes me very nervous,” she said. “I don’t know a lot about wolves, but I also don’t want to encounter them ever.”  Mike Gladish said this is the first time wolf warnings have been posted on the trails, but adds it’s no different from other safety advisories.

South Carolina 03/02/12 Columbia, Lexington & Richland Counties: A third fox attack in two weeks has another area resident, this time a firefighter, receiving post-exposure prophylaxis rabies treatments. A gray fox bit Robert Adkins, 20, as he walked away from a fire training site near a wooded area on Ball Park Road. See http://www.thestate.com/2012/03/02/2173809/another-fox-attack-reported.html

Texas 03/01/12 College Station, Brazos County: Officials are looking for a brown Dachshund that bit a person in the 400 block of Walton Drive so they can confirm the dog’s rabies vaccination status. See http://www.theeagle.com/local/Search-under-way-for-dachshund-that-bit-College-Station-homeown–7005320

Virginia 03/01/12 Pittsylvania/Danville Health District: A rabies alert has been issued for residents of Franklin Turnpike after a second skunk tested positive for the virus this week. See http://www2.wsls.com/news/2012/mar/01/skunk-tests-positive-rabies-pittsylvania-county-ar-1732851/

Book Review:

Out of the Woods: Healing from Lyme Disease and other Chronic Illness by Katina I. Makris – Review by Olivera Baumgartner-Jackson: When a healer and a health care columnist spends several years completely baffled and in absolute torment, chances are that her mysterious flu-like illness is something that is truly difficult to diagnose. It took Katina Makris five years to receive a correct diagnosis, and a long time to even partially recover from it. Her journey is described beautifully in Out of the Woods, which encompasses both her memoirs and an eye-opening “Nuts and Bolts” section on signs, symptoms, and available treatments for Lyme disease. There were many valuable lessons to be learned from this beautifully written book. Some were rather obvious ones about cherishing what we have, since it could so easily be gone the very next moment, the importance of having a good support system and the need to work with one’s doctor(s). Then there were those that should be obvious, but many times are not, like the importance of being persistent in trying to get your point across to the doctor when one does not feel that the real issue is being addressed. – For complete review see http://www.seattlepi.com/lifestyle/blogcritics/article/Book-Review-Out-of-the-Woods-Healing-from-Lyme-3371247.php

CDC Reports:

North America & South Korea cdc.gov: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Number 3 – March 2012: Abstract – Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, transmissible prion disease that affects captive and free-ranging deer, elk, and moose. Although the zoonotic potential of CWD is considered low, identification of multiple CWD strains and the potential for agent evolution upon serial passage hinders a definitive conclusion. Surveillance for CWD in free-ranging populations has documented a continual geographic spread of the disease throughout North America. CWD prions are shed from clinically and preclinically affected hosts, and CWD transmission is mediated at least in part by the environment, perhaps by soil. Much remains unknown, including the sites and mechanisms of prion uptake in the naive host. There are no therapeutics or effective eradication measures for CWD-endemic populations. Continued surveillance and research of CWD and its effects on cervid ecosystems is vital for controlling the long-term consequences of this emerging disease. – For complete report see http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/18/3/11-0685_article.htm#suggestedcitation

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