OREGONIAN hospitalized with illness believed to be PLAGUE ~ ILLINOIS & NEW YORK counties issue WEST NILE VIRUS alerts ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending June 2, 2012.

Image courtesy Federal Drug Administration.

Oregon 06/12/12 oregonlive.com: by Lynne Terry – A man hospitalized in Bend is likely suffering from the plague, marking the fifth case in Oregon since 1995. The unidentified man, who is in his 50s, fell ill several days after being bitten while trying to get a mouse away from a stray cat. The man is now being treated at St. Charles Medical Center-Bend, where he was listed in critical condition on Tuesday. “This can be a serious illness,” said Emilio DeBess, Oregon’s public health veterinarian. “But it is treatable with antibiotics, and it’s also preventable.” The Black Death raged through Europe during the Middle Ages, killing about a third of the population. Today, the disease is rare, but the bacteria have never disappeared. The man, who lives in rural Crook County, was bitten Saturday, June 2. He developed a fever a few days later. By Friday, June 8, he was so sick that he checked himself into St. Charles Medical Center-Redmond. He was later transferred to the larger facility in Bend. Karen Yeargain, communicable disease coordinator with Crook County Health Department, said lab tests are being done to confirm whether the man has the plague, but she said he is suffering from classic symptoms.

Image courtesy Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There’s one bacterium that causes the disease — Yersinia pestis — but it can develop into three types of illnesses depending on how an individual’s body reacts. Initially, the man had swollen lymph nodes — a sign of bubonic plague — but now he’s showing signs of septicemic  plague, when the bacteria multiply in the bloodstream. Symptoms include abdominal pain, bleeding mouth, nose or rectum and dying tissue. The third type is pneumonic plague, which affects the lungs. DeBess said it’s not clear whether the man was bitten by the mouse or by the cat. The feline died, and its body has been sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for testing. – For complete article see http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2012/06/man_likely_sickened_by_plague.html

Illinois 06/11/12 Wood River, Madison County: Two crows found on June 4th tested positive for West Nile Virus. – See http://www.ksdk.com/news/article/323506/3/Two-crows-test-positive-for-West-Nile-Virus-in-Madison-Illinois

New York 06/12/12 Cicero, Onondaga County: Health officials announced last week that a pool of mosquitoes collected at the Route 298 trap tested positive for West Nile Virus. – See http://www.9wsyr.com/news/local/story/West-Nile-virus-confirmed-in-CNY/gmH0ynbh2UWSE7Ssd3RC9A.cspx

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending June 2, 2012:

Published June 8, 2012/ 61(22); ND-297-ND-310

Anaplasmosis . . . 5 . . . New York (3), Rhode Island (2),

Brucellosis . . . 3 . . . California, Florida (2)

Ehrlichiosis . . . 13 . . . Florida, Maryland (2), Missouri (4), Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia (4),

Giardiasis . . . 99 . . . Arkansas, California (14), Florida (29), Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine (3), Maryland (2), Michigan, Missouri (3), Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New York (18), Ohio (8), Oregon, Pennsylvania (6), Virginia (2), Washington (4), Wisconsin,

Lyme Disease . . .  109. . .  Delaware (7), Florida (2), Maryland (10), Michigan (2), New Jersey, New York (40), Pennsylvania (22), Vermont (7), Virginia (16), Washington, Wisconsin,

Rabies (Animal) . . . 51. . . Arkansas, Illinois, Maine, Maryland (16), Michigan (2), New Hampshire, Ohio, Texas (15), Vermont, Virginia (12),

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 1. . . Missouri,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 24 . . . Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri (4), Nebraska, North Carolina (4), Tennessee (7), Virginia (6),

Tularemia . . . 2 . . . Missouri.

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