BLACK BEAR attacks WISCONSIN bird hunter ~ MALARIA infections hit 40-year high in U.S. ~ NEW MEXICO woman dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from MS, & TXx3 ~ RABIES reports from CT, GA, NJ, NY, VT, & VA.

Black bear. Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Black bear. Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Wisconsin 10/30/13 wqow.com: by Jackson Schmidtke – Sometimes when you go hunting you come across animals you’re not looking to hunt. A Barron County grouse hunter’s encounter on Saturday put him and his dog in the hospital. “It was a spot where he would have never seen this bear laying on the ground,” said DNR Conservation Warden Phillip Dorn. Phil Anderson was hunting ruffed grouse at the Loon Lake Wildlife Area when he heard branches cracking. He thought it was a deer but it turned out to be a black bear. “I heard my dog squealing in distress and I kind of figured out what was happening,” Anderson said. Anderson’s dog had encountered a mother bear and her cubs in Barron County.

a.LoonLake.WI“I yelled for the dog and immediately the adult bear came from that direction and charged at me and knocked me on my back,” said Anderson “She batted me a few times and shook me and then she went back to my dog.”  After regaining his feet, Anderson yelled at the bear hoping to scare it. The bear left the dog and charged Anderson again. This time Anderson was prepared and was able to shoot the bear point blank in the face with birdshot, a lightweight ammo that typically would not down a bear. “Birdshot doesn’t really penetrate that well from distances,” said Dorn “but this was very close range. Probably within three feet.” The 275-pound bear died instantly.  Anderson and his dog were able to walk three quarters of a mile to his truck. He then drove home where he and his wife assessed his injuries and drove to Cumberland hospital. From there he was airlifted to Regions Hospital in the Twin Cities to have his wounds cleaned and closed. – For complete article and video see http://www.wqow.com/story/23834852/2013/10/30/hunter-attacked-by-bear-in-barron-county

Malaria:

a.malaria.298ed98National 10/31/13 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – The number of malaria cases in the U.S. hit a 40-year peak in 2011, the CDC reported. The 1,925 cases, including five deaths, represent an increase of 14% from the 1,691 cases in 2010 and the largest number since 1971, when the agency was notified of 3,180 cases. The 2011 toll includes 1,920 cases classified as imported, as well as one laboratory-acquired case, one related to a transfusion, two congenital cases, and one cryptic case, the agency said in a surveillance summary in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Not only were there more cases, but more cases were classified as severe in 2011 than in 2010, 275 versus 183, a difference that was significant at P=0.0018.

a.MalariaMap.9899f8The CDC report suggested that the increased numbers might be a result of growing international travel to malarial regions, combined with inadequate chemoprevention by travelers. “Malaria isn’t something many doctors see frequently in the United States thanks to successful malaria elimination efforts in the 1940s,” according to CDC Director Thomas Frieden, MD. “The increase in malaria cases reminds us that Americans remain vulnerable and must be vigilant against diseases like malaria because our world is so interconnected by travel,” he said in a statement.

Anopheles mosquito. Malaria carrier. CDC

Anopheles mosquito. Malaria carrier. CDC

The U.S. figures also appear to parallel increases in other countries, the agency said, noting that 2011 numbers in the United Kingdom were up 22% from 2008, although down slightly from 2010. The findings are based on data submitted to the National Malaria Surveillance System, the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, and the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/42630

Blogger’s Note: Malaria gets very little attention in this blog because, as the numbers reflect, it is primarily an issue for those who travel to other areas of the world and not one of major concern to those who work, play, hike, camp, hunt and fish in the great American outdoors. This article, however, is extremely interesting. JG

Hantavirus:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

New Mexico 10/31/13 Santa Fe County: Officials have confirmed that a 73-year-old female resident of the county has died of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, a disease transmitted through the urine, droppings, or saliva of rodents, especially deer mice. – See http://www.abqjournal.com/291992/abqnewsseeker/hantavirus-claims-second-new-mexico-death.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

MS_71058_121809421211160_5406251_nMississippi 10/30/13 MS Dept of Health: State officials have confirmed that the third WNV-related fatality this year involved a resident of Forrest County previously reported as a human case of the virus. There have now been 43 human cases reported in the state, including the three fatalities. – For details see http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,14460,341.html

dallas cty TXTexas 10/30/13 Dallas County: Officials have confirmed the 14th human case of WNV in the 75089 ZIP code area (Rowlett) of the county this year. – See http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/health/Dallas-County-Confirms-14th-Case-of-West-Nile-Virus-229943881.html

Ector_County.TXTexas 10/30/13 Ector County: Officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV in Odessa. – See http://www.oaoa.com/people/health/article_f0371c44-4106-11e3-8c42-0019bb30f31a.html

Midland_County.TXTexas 10/29/13 Midland County: Officials have confirmed five human cases of WNV in the City of Midland, and Midland Health & Senior Services is currently investigating two new cases. – See video and article at http://www.permianbasin360.com/news-article/more-west-nile-cases-confirmed/d/news-article/rCdvp8HR9Eyypq7O025x4Q

Rabies:

xchng_rabid_meanieMeanDog45Connecticut 10/30/3 New Haven County: East Shore Health District officials are warning Branford residents to take precautions after a raccoon that attacked two dogs tested positive for rabies. Dogs, cats, and livestock should be vaccinated. – For complete article and other precautions see http://branford.patch.com/groups/around-town/p/health-district-rabid-raccoon-discovered-in-branford

PHIL_2186_loresCDCGeorgia 10/29/13 Madison County: Two wild animals have recently tested positive for rabies: a skunk that was in contact with a dog in the 1000 block of Coley Davis Road in Danielsville, and a raccoon that was in contact with a cat in the 400 block of Forest Lane in Colbert. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/6511-Two-positive-rabies-cases-reported.html

rasf2New Jersey 10/30/13 Camden County: A skunk that was in contact with a dog in Voorhees Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2013/10/30/skunk-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-camden-county-2/

Rabies. Cow dying of rabies.  Copyright ITMNew York 10/30/13 Herkimer County: A cow stabled in the town of Stark has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.uticaod.com/latestnews/x1155601678/Rabid-cow-confirmed-in-Herkimer-County

fox-and-raccoon-nibble2 (2)Vermont 10/29/13 Addison County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a raccoon and a fox found in Bristol tested positive for the virus. The raccoon bit a man, and the fox was dying when it was found. – See http://www.addison-eagle.com/news/2013/oct/29/town-bristol-rabies-alert/

raccoon-loomcomVirginia 10/30/13 Pittsylvania County: A Rabies Alert has been issued by Pittsylvania/Danville Health District officials after a raccoon found in the vicinity of Old Mine Road in the Gretna area tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.godanriver.com/news/pittsylvania_county/article_576c0ca8-4170-11e3-a39d-0019bb30f31a.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s