1000 people to be evaluated for exposure to RABIES at SOUTH CAROLINA hospital ~ MAINE newspaper reports huge increase in state’s ANAPLASMOSIS cases over a decade ~ Other RABIES reports from TX, & VA.

Big brown bat. Common in South Carolina. Bing free use license.

Big brown bat. Common in South Carolina. Bing free use license.

South Carolina 02/17/14 wistv.com: by LaDonna Beeker – Governmental agencies are asking more than 1,000 patients and employees at The Regional Medical Center to get a health assessment immediately since the hospital reported bat sightings. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control asks patients who stayed overnight in the hospital’s east wing between Jan. 1 and Feb. 16 to contact DHEC to assess their health risk for possible exposure to bats, which can sometimes transmit rabies to people. DHEC and Centers for Disease Control are currently notifying more than 800 patients and Big_brown_bat28834300 hospital staff to encourage individuals who had direct contact with a bat or who awakened to find a bat in a room to call DHEC at 1-800-868-0404 to assess their potential risk for rabies exposure and provide referrals for further medical evaluation, if needed. DHEC is working with The Regional Medical Center and the CDC to investigate reports of recent bat sightings and contact with bats. To date, the joint investigation has not identified any reports of bites from bats by The Regional Medical Center patients or employees. – For complete article see http://www.wistv.com/story/24745074/dhec

Anaplasmosis:

Deer tick, aka Blacklegged Tick.

Deer tick, aka Blacklegged Tick.

Maine 02/16/14 kjonline.com: Epidemiologists in the state are paying close attention to a steady rise in patients presenting with anaplasmosis, yet another tick-borne virus that can cause fever, chills, fatigue, a headache or muscle pain and in some cases, death, particularly if contracted by a person whose immune system has been compromised. The disease infects white blood cells and cases have increased by a factor of ten over the past decade. According to the CDC, about one in 200 people diagnosed with the disease does not survive.

ana_incid.cdcAnaplasmosis was first recognized in the U.S. in the 1990s. In  2004, the state of Maine reported one case, its first. Eight years later, in 2012, the number of cases in Maine had increased to 52. Preliminary figures for 2013 suggest that number in Maine has now risen to 94 in a single year. – For complete article, relative statistics and preventive measures see http://www.kjonline.com/news/Anaplasmosis__Maine_s_other_tick-borne_disease_.html

Other Rabies Reports:

Texas 02/17/14 Tarrant County: A skunk captured near the Oak Lake Park area of east Fort Worth in ZIP code 76103 has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/02/17/5576511/rabid-skunk-caught-88e779r0ekilled-in-east.html?rh=1

Virginia 02/17/14 Gloucester County: A raccoon that wandered into a yard on Mark Pine Road in Bena last week exposed three dogs to rabies. One of the dogs was current on its vaccination, but two of the dogs were not. – See http://www.dailypress.com/news/gloucester-county/gloucester-blog/dp-raccoon-exposes-three-bena-dogs-to-rabies-20140217,0,7324709.story

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