World traveler hospitalized in MINNESOTA with LASSA FEVER ~ UTAH confirms case of HANTAVIRUS ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: OREGON’s celebrity WOLF OR-7 may soon exit stage ~ RABIES reports from AZ, AR, CT, FL, GA, MD, NJ, NCx2, PA, SCx2 & VA.

Rat. Bing free use license.

Rat. Bing free use license.

Minnesota 04/04/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A man is in stable condition in a Minnesota hospital with Lassa fever after returning from a trip to West Africa, where an outbreak of Ebola virus is now raging. The Minnesota Department of Health said the man flew to Minneapolis-St. Paul on March 31 and soon after his arrival visited a physician. Because of his travel history and symptoms, the doctor suspected a possible hemorrhagic fever. The man was admitted to the hospital with fever and confusion and CDC testing confirmed a diagnosis of Lassa fever on April 3, the department and the CDC said in separate statements. “This imported case is a reminder that we are all connected by international travel,” CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said in a statement. “A disease anywhere can appear anywhere else in the world withinhours.”

Air routes connecting to and from Africa.

Air routes connecting to and from Africa.

Lassa fever is rarely seen in the U.S., with only seven cases recorded, the latest in 2010, according to the CDC. The agency reported that preliminary information suggests the man flew from West Africa to New York City and on to Minneapolis on another flight. The agency did not say where in West Africa the trip started. The CDC is working with public health officials and airlines to identify anyone who might have had close contact with the infected person, although Lassa fever is not easily spread from human to human. “Casual contact is not a risk factor for getting Lassa fever,” said Barbara Knust, DVM, a CDC epidemiologist in the lab that tested the patient’s blood for Lassa virus. “People will not get this infection just because they were on the same airplane or in the same airport,” she said in a statement.

RatthumbnailCANGBSFFThe Lassa virus is carried by rodents and transmitted to humans through contact with urine or droppings, but in some cases people can catch it from another person through direct contact with blood or bodily fluids, the mucous membranes, or sexual contact. “Given what we know about how Lassa virus is spread to people, the risk to other travelers and members of the public is extremely low,” Martin Cetron, MD, of the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, said in a statement. Between 100,000 and 300,000 cases of Lassa fever occur in West Africa each year, with up to 5,000 deaths. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/45120?isalert=1&uun=g632000d1042R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-04-04

Author’s Note: For more information on Lassa Fever see http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/lassa/

Hantavirus:

imagesCAULAVUQUtah 04/04/14 kcsg.com: The Southwest Utah Public Health Department (SWUPHD) has confirmed a case of hantavirus infection in Kane County. Hantavirus incidences are rare in the five-county region, with the last case being reported four years ago in Iron County. The virus is found in the droppings, urine, and saliva of rodents, usually deer-mice. “This time of year, a lot of people start spring cleaning in places where rodent droppings are found; such as sheds, barns, and cabins,” says Dr. David Blodgett, SWUPHD Health Officer. “If hantavirus is present, it can be inhaled and cause respiratory illness within a few weeks.” Hantavirus infection, called Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, starts with flu-like symptoms followed by difficulty breathing and can be life-threatening. Treatment includes intensive hospital care to deal with the respiratory distress. Hantavirus is not known to spread person-to-person. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.kcsg.com/view/full_story/24877415/article-Hantavirus-Infection-in-Southwest-Utah?instance=more_local_news1

Follow-Up Report:

Wolf OR-7:

(See previous posts dated 11/12/11, through 12/13/13)

graywolfNPRphotoOregon 03/29/14 missoulian.com: The wandering wolf dubbed OR-7 has enjoyed well over his 15 minutes of fame. But even with continued public interest, he could soon fade from the spotlight. The Global Positioning System collar that has sent regular electronic pulses to reveal his travels for the past three years has eclipsed its normal life span, and state and federal biologists don’t plan to replace it. “When that collar dies, we’ll never know his fate,” Rob Klavins of the conservation group Oregon Wild told the Mail Tribune newspaper. “But that could be OK. It’s good to have a little mystery in the world.“ The wolf gained celebrity status in 2011 after leaving a pack in northeastern Oregon, days after the state issued a kill order for his father and a sibling for preying on livestock.

wolfMost Oregon wolves on such journeys, called dispersals, have stayed in northeast Oregon or traveled to Idaho. The young wolf headed west with the tracking satellite following his moves as he fruitlessly searched for a mate. He became the first confirmed wolf in western Oregon since the last one was killed under a livestock-protection bounty program in 1937. He then crossed a state line and became California’s only confirmed wolf since 1924. He wandered throughout Northern California and almost traveled into Nevada before retracing his steps to southern Oregon, where he’s spending his time near Mount McLoughlin. The wolf will not be re-collared because biologists prefer to collar breeding pairs or members of packs. Collaring can be dangerous and time-consuming, and biologists would rather collar animals in other packs not sporting GPS collars to get information on their whereabouts and habits instead of an established bachelor like OR-7. – See this article at http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/oregon-wandering-wolf-s-signal-ready-to-fade/article_15a8644a-b6ac-11e3-aef0-001a4bcf887a.html. See 3/22/14 companion article about a group retracing the path of wandering Oregon wolf OR-7 at http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/group-retracing-trek-of-wandering-oregon-wolf-or/article_bad003c8-b121-11e3-bc24-001a4bcf887a.html

Rabies:

a898778rabies-alertArizona 04/04/14 Santa Cruz County: Officials have announced that the entire county is under quarantine after an outbreak of rabies reached record-breaking levels. The quarantine order, effective through December 31st, was issued after 23 positive cases of rabies were reported since January 1st of this year. The county recorded only 12 cases in all of 2013. – See http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/county-now-under-rabies-quarantine/article_1a9ef380-bc0e-11e3-a7b0-0019bb2963f4.html

323rabies-skunk_mediumArkansas 04/01/14 Pulaski County: A skunk that was observed behaving strangely near the 800 block of Buttercup in North Little Rock‘s Levy neighborhood has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/rabies-warning-in-north-little-rock/59358/GB4-wF9jxECoaYCA8PI3Gw

Connecticut 04/02/14 Hartford County: A raccoon that fought with two vaccinated dogs on Rogers Lane in Enfield on March 26th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.journalinquirer.com/towns/enfield/raccoon-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-enfield/article_84f6f590-ba68-11e3-acb9-001a4bcf887a.html

17858296_BG1Florida 03/29/14 Hernando County: A raccoon that fought with a vaccinated dog on Sun Hill Lane in Brooksville has tested positive for rabies. – See http://tbo.com/health/rabid-raccoon-reported-in-east-brooksville-20140329/

Georgia 04/02/14 Hall County: A raccoon that fought with a dog on Bowen Bridge Road in the Clermont area is the fourth wild animal in the county to test positive for rabies so far this year. – See http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=273283

17907533_240X180Maryland 03/31/14 Prince George’s County: A fox removed from the 4000 block of Woodrow Lane in Bowie on March 21st has tested positive for rabies. – See http://laurel.patch.com/groups/politics-and-elections/p/fox-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-bowie

raccoonrabid113524New Jersey 04/01/14 Atlantic County: A raccoon removed from the backyard of a resident in the 4000 block of Ridge Avenue in Egg Harbor Township is the third animal to test positive for rabies in the township so far this year. – See http://www.shorenewstoday.com/snt/news/index.php/egg-harbor-twp/eht-general-news/50867-third-case-of-rabies-found-in-egg-harbor-township.html

rabiesAlert521d4-1North Carolina 04/04/14 Cleveland County: Eighteen people are being treated for potential exposure to rabies after a Good Samaritan in the town of Lawndale adopted one of two puppies that were abandoned and were wandering along Elam Road. The adopted puppy began acting sickly and when brought to a clinic was diagnosed with and tested positive for the virus. Making matters worse, the other puppy ran away. Officials are warning area residents who might have been in contact with either of the puppies to seek immediate medical attention. – See http://www.wsmv.com/story/25158263/stray-puppies-leave-cleveland-co-neighbors-owing-thousands-of-dollars-in-medical-bills

320x240North Carolina 03/28/14 Cumberland County: A bat found between Pamalee Drive and Murhison Road in Fayetteville has tested positive for rabies. This is the 3rd case of the virus to be confirmed in the county this year. – See http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/article_1026ca27-0ce1-51f8-9ed6-2af733ba68ac.html

Rabid-Fox---26690055Pennsylvania 04/02/14 Montgomery County: A fox that was killed by a resident’s unvaccinated dog on the 2000 block of Weber Road in Worcester Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.timesherald.com/general-news/20140402/montgomery-county-health-department-confirms-fox-positive-for-rabies-in-worcester

Cat-RabiesSouth Carolina 04/01/14 Laurens County: A stray cat found in or near the town of Gray Court has tested positive for rabies. At least one person has been advised to seek treatment for possible exposure to the virus. – See http://www.independentmail.com/news/2014/apr/01/cat-exposes-person-rabies-laurens-county/

South Carolina 03/29/14 Aiken County: A man in his 20s has been advised to seek post-expsosure treatment for rabies after a raccoon entered his home on Limerick Drive in Aiken and scratched his face. The raccoon has since tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.aikenstandard.com/article/20140329/AIK0101/140329342/1004/man-recommended-to-undergo-treatment-after-rabies-exposure

crittersVirginia 04/04/14 Prince William Health District: A cat found on March 31st near Forest Glen Road in Woodbridge between Horner Road and Hylton Avenue has tested positive for rabies. And in Nokesville, four raccoons and a skunk have tested positive for the virus since July of 2013. A Rabies Alert has been issued for both communities. – See http://www.insidenova.com/health/health-district-warns-residents-about-rabies-in-woodbridge-nokesville/article_a439195c-bc3d-11e3-947e-0019bb2963f4.html

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