Study finds ELK may adapt to CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE ~ BEAR attacks DANISH birdwatcher in CANADA ~ COLORADAN hospitalized with HANTAVIRUS infection ~ Interesting RABIES reports from MD, SC, TX & VT.

Bull elk bugling. Courtesy National Park Service.

Bull elk bugling. Courtesy National Park Service.

Wyoming 07/21/14 ktvq.com: A 10-year study conducted by the University of Wyoming and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department suggests that the effects of chronic wasting disease (CWD) on elk populations may not be as devastating as once believed. Research has shown that genes play a role in elk susceptibility to CWD. Some elk have genes that prolong the time between exposure to the CWD prion, the infectious agent of CWD, and the onset of the disease. These genes become dominant over many decades, greatly reducing the impact of CWD on the population. Elk with these genes live longer even when heavily exposed to CWD and therefore have more opportunity to reproduce than elk with other genes.

WY-2010-12-06_16-28-11_078Some people have feared that winter feed grounds for elk would concentrate the disease resulting in much higher incidence of CWD. “This study model essentially represents the worst-case scenario that would face feed ground elk,” said Dr. Terry Kreeger, retired state wildlife veterinarian for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “We predict a genetic shift over several decades favoring genes that prolong the incubation time of CWD resulting in elk populations that are able to persist in the face of the disease.”

WY_GFD-LogoScott Edberg, deputy chief of the Wyoming Game and Fish Wildlife Division states: “It helps to know that based on this research, if CWD should become established on feed grounds, we won’t see a devastating effect on populations as many have feared. This research also looked at how hunting would affect populations, and it appears, Game and Fish would still need to have hunting seasons to manage elk populations even if faced with CWD on feed grounds.” – See http://www.ktvq.com/news/study-finds-elk-may-be-able-to-adapt-to-chronic-wasting-disease-214986/

Bear Attack:

field_trip_atlas_of_canada_subsetCanada 07/22/14 Alberta: A 53-year-old tourist from Copenhagen, Denmark, was attacked by a bear on July 19th while looking for a good spot to birdwatch along the Powerline trail by Quarry Lake near Canmore. The man defended himself with his binoculars and there was a struggle, and the man suffered bruises and scratches, but the bear suddenly turned and left without ever so much as knocking the man to the ground. It’s believed the bear as feeding on berries and was startled. Fish and Wildlife officers have closed the area and set traps for the bear, but it hasn’t been seen since the attack. – For complete article see http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/alberta/blue+this+bear+attacked+recalls+Danish+birdwatcher/10052325/story.html

Hantavirus:

504f618286f53_preview-300Colorado 07/23/14 postindependent.com: Officials have confirmed a case of hantavirus in a Mesa County resident. The patient was being treated at a Denver hospital as of July 21st. – See http://www.postindependent.com/news/12325603-113/hantavirus-case-county-droppings

Rabies:

rabies.warningMaryland 07/21/14 Wicomico County: A feral cat found in the Friendship Road area of Pittsville has tested positive for rabies. Individuals recently exposed to a feral cat in the Pittsville area should call Animal Control at the county Humane Society. – See http://www.wboc.com/story/26072724/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-wicomico-county

South Carolina 07/23/14 Greenville County: A feral cat that was in contact with an area resident has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wyff4.com/news/cat-exposes-person-to-rabies-in-greenville-county/27108696#!bkT7Wj

can_you_helpTexas 07/23/14 Austin/Travis County Health: Officials are asking the public to help locate a man who may have been exposed to rabies. On Saturday, July 19th at approximately 10:30 a.m., a call came into Animal Services dispatch regarding a grounded bat. By the time APD arrived, a man had picked up the bat, running toward the Ann Richards Bridge.  If anyone has information, please contact our Disease Surveillance Program at 512-972-5555. Rabies exposure occurs only when a person is bitten or scratched by a potentially rabid animal, or when abrasions, open wounds, or mucous membranes are contaminated with the saliva, brain, or nervous system tissue of a potentially rabid animal. It may take several weeks or longer for people to show symptoms after being infected with rabies. The early signs of rabies can be fever or headache, but this changes quickly to nervous system signs such as confusion, sleepiness, or agitation. Once someone with a rabies infection has the advanced symptoms, that person usually does not survive. – See http://www.austintexas.gov/news/possible-human-exposure-rabies-2

Vermont 07/22/14 Chittendon County: A woodchuck that bit a South Road resident in Williston last weekend has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/local/2014/07/22/williston-woodchuck-test-positive-rabies/13013557/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s