CALIFORNIAN attacked by BOBCAT ~ DEER farm in IOWA is new CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE title holder ~ COLORADO warns HUNTERS of widespread TULAREMIA ~ RABIES reports from MD & VA.

Bobcat. Courtesy National Park Service.

Bobcat. Courtesy National Park Service.

California 10/02/14 keyt.com: by Claire Scholl and Tracy Lehr – A 65-year-old woman is recovering in the hospital from multiple bobcat bites and scratches to her hand, arm and neck. The attack occurred at the Alisal Guest Ranch at about 12:30 p.m. Thursday. State Department of Fish and Wildlife officers said the woman, who works at the ranch, was eating lunch at a picnic table around the corner from the ranch entrance when she was attacked. They did not know what she was eating, but they said she tried to push the bobcat away but the animal came back. Officers said the bobcat had mange and looked emaciated. They found the bobcat beneath a wooden bridge nearby and killed it. Ranch guests said they heard a shot fired. They saw the dead animal and said it looked like it may have been in poor health before the incident. Some people think the drought is pushing animals out of the hills to search for food and water. The ranch is in the 1000 block of Alisal Road just a few miles from Solvang. – For video and complete article see http://www.keyt.com/news/woman-attacked-by-bobcat-while-eating-lunch/28377576

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD):

HEADERIowa 10/04/14 jsonline.com: by Paul A. Smith – In the world of deer hunting, records are kept of antler size, deer harvests and license sales. States and hunters often claim bragging rights. There’s a flip side, too. News came Thursday that Iowa claimed a dubious title previously held by Wisconsin. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced 284 of 356 deer (80%) from a captive herd in north-central Iowa tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The finding represents the highest number of CWD-positive animals detected at a facility, according to wildlife health officials. “This is what happens when you allow disease to sit and percolate on a game farm,” said Bryan Richards, the CWD project leader at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison.

Deer with CWD.

Deer with CWD.

A deer farm near Portage, Wis., is infamous for having 60 of 76 deer test positive for the disease in 2006. Wisconsin purchased the farm in order to keep fences in place and prevent wild deer from entering the property. However, in 2013 a wild deer near the facility tested positive for the disease. To help combat the spread of CWD, Wisconsin has banned baiting and feeding of deer in 35 counties and requires CWD tests on all animals that die on deer and elk farms. CWD is a progressive, degenerative neurological disease found in deer, elk and moose. There is no known treatment. CWD is similar to other prion diseases including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) and human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. CWD has not been linked to human illness, but the Centers for Disease Control recommends humans not consume meat from CWD-positive animals. – For complete article see http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outdoors/iowa-deer-farm-riddled-with-chronic-wasting-disease-b99364005z1-278133231.html

TULAREMIA:

tularemia-pueblo-county-jpgColorado 10/01/14 CO Dept of Public Health: Media Release – October is the beginning of small game hunting season in Colorado. As the number of human tularemia cases in our state continues to rise, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reminds small game hunters to “hunt healthy” this year.  “We haven’t seen this many tularemia cases in Colorado since the 1980s,” said State Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Jennifer House. “Historically, we see cases of tularemia in hunters, and the disease is so widespread this year, we want to make sure our hunters understand the risks.” “In the last 10 years Colorado has averaged three human cases of tularemia a year,” Dr. House said. “So far in 2014 we have had 11, and additional suspected cases are under investigation.”

zoonosis_TularemiaLocal health departments have received numerous reports of rabbit and rodent die-offs across the state this year. Animals from 12 counties tested positive for tularemia, a bacterial disease that can affect small game animals. It commonly causes illness and death in rabbits and rodents such as squirrels. People can get tularemia if they handle infected animals or are bitten by ticks or deer flies. People also can be exposed to tularemia by touching contaminated soil, drinking contaminated water or inhaling bacteria. Hunters are most at risk when skinning game and preparing and consuming the meat. – For precaution and complete release see https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news/tularemia-hunters

RABIES:

Maryland 10/01/14 Baltimore County: A male, gray-striped tabby cat, possibly with a limp, found in the vicinity of Delight Road in Reisterstown has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wbaltv.com/news/cat-5731289-very-cute-child-with-a-cat-in-armsfrom-reisterstown-area-tests-positive-for-rabies/28357964

Virginia 10/01/14 Warren County: A domestic short hair orange tabby cat with white feet and white belly that attacked a person on Fletcher Street near the Happy Creek Bike Trail in Front Royal on September 29th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.nvdaily.com/news/2014/10/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies.php

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