CANADA: HUNTER mauled by GRIZZLY and shot by friend in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ TEXAS HEALTHCARE WORKER infected with EBOLA ~ Current EBOLA outbreak believed due to consumption of BAT meat ~ CDC predicts CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS will spread in U.S. ~ MAINE reports first ever HUMAN case of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and heavy increase in ANAPLASMOSIS cases ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, IL & SD ~ RABIES reports from AL & NJ.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

British Columbia 10/12/14 globalnews.ca: by Negar Mojtahedi – A 56-year-old man has been transported by air ambulance to Calgary’s Foothills hospital after he was mauled by a grizzly bear and shot by his friend while hunting near Fernie, British Columbia. Early Sunday morning, conservation officers and emergency crews responded to reports of grizzly bear attack in the Elk Valley. “This is a somewhat remote area and there’s no history with this bear,” said Sgt. Cam Schley, a conservation officer from Cranbrook. The victim’s hunting partner shot and killed the 400 pound male grizzly bear. In the process, he accidentally shot his friend. His injuries are the result of being mauled by the animal and from gunfire. The victim’s hunting partner was not injured by the grizzly bear.

sebcmapDavid Karn, a spokesman for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, says the victim was in stable condition when he left the area. He is currently at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and is now believed to be in critical condition. The two men were not hunting grizzly bears. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1611225/grizzly-bear-attack-in-fernie/

EBOLA VIRUS:

EBOLA-texas-us-flag-monitorTexas 10/12/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A female healthcare worker who was involved in the care of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus. The unidentified worker, who was among those monitoring themselves for possible symptoms, developed a fever Friday night and told medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Less than 90 minutes later, the worker was in an isolation unit at the hospital, having driven to the facility, according to Daniel Varga, MD, the chief clinical officer at Texas Health Resources. A close contact of the worker is also “proactively” in isolation, Varga told reporters at a media briefing in Dallas. In a subsequent briefing, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said investigators believed the worker had only the one contact during the period when she may have been infectious. Varga said the patient and her contact are being cared for in a 24-bed intensive care unit that had been cleared for use by possible Ebola patients. He said he could not discuss the other aspects of the care of the patient. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins the county’s chief executive, said blood tests at the state reference laboratory in Austin, using polymerase chain reaction methods, showed the worker has Ebola. A second test, at the CDC, has not yet confirmed the finding, he said, but “unfortunately, we’re confident it will be.” Frieden said results of the confirmatory test were expected later on Sunday. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Ebola/48054?isalert=1&uun=g632000d2324R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-10-12

Straw colored fruit  bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Straw colored fruit bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Global 10/09/14 ibtimes.co.uk: by Hannah Osborne – People in Ghana eat bats because it is a readily available source of protein as well as being a luxury food, researchers have found. Experts at the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London were looking to find out why ‘bushmeat’ is so popular in the West African country despite the risks involved. Like many infections, Ebola is likely to have arisen from human interaction with wild animals. The current outbreak, which has killed almost 4,000 people, is believed to have come from hunting and eating bats. Researchers surveyed almost 600 people across Ghana to find out why the practice is so prevalent, despite the risks involved. Hunting and eating bats can lead to infection of ‘zoonotic’ pathogens, with the creatures in particular known for hosting more viruses than any other mammal. Transmission occurs from bites, scratches, bodily fluids, tissue and excrement.

Cambridge LogoFrom surveying hunters, vendors and bat meat consumZoological_Society_of_London_(logo)ad been bitten and scratched. None reported using protective equipment, such as gloves. Four of those interviewed said people fight over bats, sometimes lying over the animal while it was still alive to stop others from taking it – often resulting in injury. Bats were prepared and cooked in a variety of ways, with the most common being to smoke them and putting them in soup. Researchers said it appears bat bushmeat is both a source of sustenance and luxury food, as many hunters said they would keep their catches for themselves. Consumers reported high taste ratings and relatively high prices, suggesting it is a sought-after product. – For complete article see http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak-why-do-people-eat-bat-meat-1469295

CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS (CHIKV):

aaCDC-LogoWestern Hemisphere 10/07/14 cdc.gov: Media Release – Since the chikv outbreak began in December 2013, nearly 750,000 cases have been reported in the Caribbean and Central, South and North America. In the United States, 1,200 travelers have imported the virus to the United States, and 11 locally transmitted cases have been reported in Florida as of September 30. The mosquitoes that can transmit chikv are common in many parts of the Americas, including the United States. CDC anticipates that the virus will continue to spread to new areas in the Americas. In the United States, CDC experts believe chikv will behave like dengue virus. Imported dengue cases have led to small, sporadic local transmission in the continental United States but have not led to widespread outbreaks. – See http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p1006-chikungunya-in-americas.html

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

EEE54fgh84Maine 10/10/14 pressherald.com: A York County resident over 60 has been identified as the state’s first human case of EEE since Maine began testing for the virus in 1964. The individual fell sick in late July and was hospitalized in August, first in Maine and later in Massachusetts, but has since returned home to recuperate.- For complete article see http://www.pressherald.com/2014/10/10/first-maine-resident-tests-positive-for-eee/

ANAPLASMOSIS:

tickPreview2Maine 10/11/14 outbreaktoday.com: According to state health officials there have been 133 cases of anaplasmosis reported in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 94 cases reported during the same time period last year. That’s an increase of 39 cases, or more than 40% with three months remaining in the year. Nationally, the number of anaplasmosis cases reported to the CDC has increased from 348 cases in 2000, to 1,761 cases in 2010. The disease is tick-borne and people get the infection when bitten by an infected deer tick, the same one involved in the transmission of Lyme disease. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-reports-dozens-more-anaplasmosis-cases-compared-to-2013-2013/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 10/08/14 CA Dept of Health: Media Release – There were 60 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Glenn (1), Kern (2), Kings (1), Los Angeles (18), Orange (15), Riverside (4), San Bernardino (2), San Joaquin (2), Santa Clara (1), Stanislaus (3), Sutter (2), Tehama (1), Tulare (1), and Yolo (5). 16 WNV-related fatalities have been reported in to CDPH from in nine local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (1), Los Angeles (2), Orange (4), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). 488 human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

3495411871-1Illinois 10/07/14 DuPage County Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a female resident of Hanover Park in her 40s is the first fatality in the county due to WNV. State officials report two previous deaths due to WNV this year. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/WNVdeath2014

SDdhSouth Dakota 09/30/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 49 human cases of WNV statewide in 25 counties. – See Page 3at https://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Sept2014.pdf

RABIES:

Alabama 10/07/14 Covington County: A coyote found about three miles 1_62_coyote_snarlsouth of Andalusia in the Carolina community has tested positive for rabies.

New Jersey 10/07/14 dailyrecord.com: by Peggy Wright – A 69-year-old bow hunter from Cliffside Park used a knife and arrow to kill a rabid coyote that jumped him Sunday at the Black River Wildlife Management Area and a day earlier bit a bicyclist on Patriot’s Path, authorities said Tuesday. . . . The Cliffside Park man, whose name was withheld, was at the rear of the Archery Range at the management area on North Road when bitten around 12:55 p.m. on Sunday. State Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said the 34-pound male coyote “jumped” the man. Cris Cooke-Gibbs, the health officer for Chester and Washington townships, said the hunter was bitten on the face. – See http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/news/local/2014/10/07/cops-rabid-coyote-bit-two-chester-township/16847079/

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