Military base employee attacked by BEAR in WASHINGTON ~ Researchers say 2012 death of TENNESSEE boy due to La Crosse virus ~ Second HANTAVIRUS fatality in COLORADO this year ~ POWASSAN VIRUS found in CONNECTICUT ~ CALIFORNIA reported record number of WEST NILE VIRUS deaths in 2014 ~ Two New EBOLA VACCINES pass early tests ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: COYOTE that attacked NEW JERSEY man was RABID ~ Other RABIES reports from PENNSYLVANIA (2).

Black bear. Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Black bear. Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Washington 04/16/15 Q13RFox.com: A civilian employee working in a training area at Joint Base Lewis-McChord was attacked by a bear. He was hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries. Base officials closed Engineer Bluff on the Lewis Main training area Thursday afternoon. – See http://q13fox.com/2015/04/16/joint-base-lewis-mcchord-employee-injured-in-bear-attack-on-base/

La CROSSE VIRUS:

lacrosse6647Tennessee 04/17/15 healthday.com: by Steven Reinberg – The death from encephalitis of a 6-year-old Tennessee boy has led researchers to a better understanding of the mosquito-borne virus that killed the child. La Crosse virus, transmitted by the bite of an infected mosquito, often causes no symptoms. But severe cases may involve encephalitis, a type of brain inflammation usually triggered by infection. “When [the La Crosse virus] does cause disease, it can cause fatal illness or make children very sick,” said Amy Lambert, a research microbiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “The disease is almost exclusively among children,” added Lambert, lead researcher of the new paper published in the May issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. In this case, the 6-year-old Union County boy was hospitalized in July 2012 after suffering two seizures and other symptoms associated with viral encephalitis. His condition deteriorated rapidly, and he was dead within five days. Illness from La Crosse virus, which was identified in 1963 in La Crosse, Wis., is uncommon. Cases each year in the United States number just 80 to 100, Lambert said. Still, these infections have increased in parts of the southeastern United States, including eastern Tennessee, where the boy was living, the CDC pointed out. “Historically, the known center of La Crosse virus activity was in the Midwest and Atlantic states,” the researcher said. Possible reasons for the increase in infections in the Southeast include more of the virus-carrying mosquitoes — known as Aedes triseriatus — or a new more potent strain of La Crosse virus in this area, Lambert said. – For complete article see http://consumer.healthday.com/general-health-information-16/bites-and-stings-news-65/tennessee-boy-s-death-highlights-mosquito-borne-virus-698496.html

HANTAVIRUS:

Deermouse.

Deermouse.

Colorado 04/11/15 durangoherald.com: by Chase Olivarius-Mcallister – The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment confirmed Friday that a La Plata County resident has died after becoming infected with hantavirus – a rare but often deadly disease carried by deer mice. Spokesman Mark Salley said it is the second confirmed case of hantavirus in the state this year. In both 2015 cases, the disease was fatal. San Juan Basin Health Department sent samples to CDPHE’s laboratory in Denver for testing earlier this week. Since 1993, the state health department has documented more than 90 cases of hantavirus in Colorado, and more than 40 percent of people died from the infection. – For complete article see http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20150410/NEWS01/150409612/La-Plata-County-resident-dies-from-hantavirus-

POWASSAN VIRUS:

tickhabitat33Connecticut 044/09/15 foxnews.com: An untreatable, and sometimes fatal tick-borne disease is turning up in parts of southern Connecticut, according to one expert. Dr. Theodore Andreadis, head of The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, told WCBS 880 that the Powassan virus has symptoms similar to those of Lyme disease, including headache, nausea and fever. Once contracted, there is no treatment for the virus, and the disease can often be fatal, Andreadis said. While there have been no reported human cases in the areas, Andreadis said that people who venture into wooded areas may encounter deer carrying ticks. “These ticks will transmit this virus when they feed within a matter of hours, whereas with Lyme disease, for example, ticks generally have to feed up to two days before they’re capable of transmitting it,” Andreadis told WCBS 880. The virus can often be symptomless before often infecting the nervous system and causing encephalitis and meningitis. Survivors can develop neurological symptoms such as muscle wasting and memory problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. – See http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/04/09/untreatable-tick-borne-virus-found-in-conn/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

080722_west_nile_genericCalifornia 04/09/15 mercurynews.com: by Christopher Weber – California saw a record number of deaths from West Nile virus last year, and the state’s drought may have contributed to the spike in infections, according to health officials. Thirty-one infected people died in 2014, the most since California began recording West Nile cases in 2003, the state Department of Public Health said Wednesday. There were 801 Californians who tested positive for the virus — coming close to the record of 880 cases a decade ago. Orange County recorded the highest number of cases, with 263. It’s possible the drought had a role in the increased West Nile activity because birds and mosquitoes, which spread the virus, were drawn to the same few water sources, said Dr. Karen Smith, director of the health department. “As birds and mosquitoes sought water, they came into closer contact and amplified the virus, particularly in urban areas. The lack of water could have caused some sources of water to stagnate, making the water sources more attractive for mosquitoes to lay eggs,” Smith said. – For complete article see http://www.mercurynews.com/health/ci_27881160/california-saw-record-number-west-nile-deaths-2014

EBOLA VACCINE:

ebola88394Global 04/08/15 nytimes.com: by Denise Grady – Two new Ebola vaccines have passed an important test, protecting monkeys against the strain of the virus responsible for the current deadly outbreak, researchers reported on Wednesday. Only one dose was needed, and there were no apparent side effects. The vaccines have not yet been tested in people, but safety trials in healthy volunteers will probably begin early this summer, said Thomas W. Geisbert, an Ebola expert at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and the senior author of a report published on Wednesday in the journal Nature. Tests in nonhuman primates are an important step, because those animals are far more closely related to humans than are other lab animals.

The study of the new vaccines involved 10 macaques. Eight were vaccinated, and two, as controls, were not. The vaccinated animals showed no signs of side effects from the vaccine, Dr. Geisbert said. On the 28th day after the vaccines were given, all the monkeys were injected with Ebola virus from the current outbreak. No vaccinated monkeys became ill, but the unvaccinated ones both died within a week. Thomas W. Geisbert, an Ebola expert at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, in his office. Credit Michael Stravato for The New York Times The two new vaccines are improved versions of an older one that was licensed to Merck and is now being tested for efficacy in people in Liberia. The older vaccine can cause unpleasant side effects like fever and pain in joints and muscles. (Another vaccine, licensed to GlaxoSmithKline, is also being tested in West Africa, and has not had serious side effects.) – For complete article see http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/health/2-new-ebola-vaccines-pass-important-early-test-researchers-say.html?emc=edit_tnt_20150408&nlid=57949252&tntemail0=y

FOLLOW-UP REPORT:

RABIES:

(See “NEW JERSEY resident attacked by COYOTE” posted April 8, 2015)

New Jersey 04/08/15 northjersey.com: by Marina Villeneuve – SADDLE RIVER — A local man bitten by a coyote on Monday said he was feeling “fine” Wednesday while undergoing preventive treatment for rabies, as authorities confirmed that the coyote had indeed been rabid. Police and state wildlife staff had tracked down and euthanized the coyote soon after it bit John Zeug, 77, as he worked in his garden. They also had discovered its nearby den and found dead coyote pups there. But Saddle River officials and police continued to urge residents not to leave small children or pets unattended outdoors as they continue to check the area for any other sick wildlife. – For complete article see http://www.northjersey.com/news/coyote-that-attacked-saddle-river-man-tests-positive-for-rabies-1.1304810

RABIES:

Pennsylvania 04/13/15 Erie County: A barn cat in Washington Township that began to show signs of paralysis in its legs has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.erietvnews.com/story/28787152/erie-county-5731289-very-cute-child-with-a-cat-in-armscat-tests-positive-for-rabies

Pennsylvania 04/14/15 Bucks County: A feral cat found in West Rockhill Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.njherald.com/story/28803111/feral-cat-in-suburban-philadelphia-diagnosed-with-rabies

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