COLORADAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ New TICK vector for RICKETTSIOSIS found in ARIZONA.

 

deerMouse.cdc

Deer mouse

Colorado 04/19/16 denverpost.com: by David Olinger – A San Luis Valley resident has died of hantavirus, a rare but often fatal illness spread by deer mice. The death was announced Tuesday by Ginger Stringer, Saguache County’s public health director. She did not identify the victim or the exact location, citing confidentiality concerns. She did offer advice on avoiding a disease that kills more than one-third of the people infected. In the San Luis Valley, hantavirus is carried by deer mice, which have tawny backs, white bellies, big eyes and big ears. People get infected by breathing the virus when stirring dust from mouse nests or droppings in areas with poor ventilation. Closed spaces, such as attics, barns and sheds, may hold droppings of infected mice, as well as wood piles occupied by mice. – For complete article see http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_29787096/colorado-resident-killed-by-hantavirus-disease-spread-by

Author’s Note: For more information about Ticks and Tick-borne diseases see http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/ and http://www.tickencounter.org/

RICKETTSIOSIS:

1-GARRAPATA-RIKETSIA (1)Arizona 04/14/16 medscape.com: by Janis C. Kelly – Two apparent cases of Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis transmitted by the Amblyomma triste tick, which is more commonly found in neotropical areas, have been found in a mountainous region of southern Arizona, indicating the disease range has expanded, according to a new report. All previous reported cases in the United States had been linked to transmission by the Gulf Coast tickAmblyomma maculatum. Kristen L. Herrick, MPH, and colleagues report the findings in an article published online April 13 in Emerging Infectious Diseases. Both patients (one confirmed as R parkeri rickettsiosis, one probable case) became ill after tick bites sustained while hiking in a mountainous area of southern Arizona, which is outside the recognized range of A maculatum ticks. – For complete article see http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/861925

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