Tag Archives: Bear

BLACK BEAR attacks CALIFORNIAN on his porch ~ Unleashed DOG likely cause of BEAR attack in NEW YORK ~ ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER leaves OKLAHOMAN woman a quad amputee ~ NEW MEXICO confirms 3 human cases of TULAREMIA and a DOG with PLAGUE ~ YOSEMITE closes campground due to PLAGUE ~ RABIES reports from DE, FL & NY.

Black Bear. Wiki.org

Black Bear. Wiki.org

California 08/13/15 latimes.com: by Veronica Rocha – A 67-year-old man fought off a bear that attacked him on his front porch as it scavenged for food on the outskirts of Yosemite National Park. The man survived the attack but suffered numerous cuts to his arms, legs and body, as well as defensive wounds to his hands, said Lt. Chris Stoots of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Wardens with the agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture were searching Wednesday for the California black bear, which will be euthanized when caught, he said. The severity of the man’s injuries and the extent of the attack left wildlife officials with no other option, he said. “Bear attacks on humans are very uncommon,” he said. The attack occurred about 4 a.m. when the man walked onto his porch and was ambushed by the bear in Midpines, a community on the edge of Yosemite National Park. The bear was feeding on a bag of trash left 20 feet from the man’s front door, Stoots said. The bear tackled the man and attacked him. But the man fought back, using his legs and arms, and eventually escaped back into his house. Injured and bloodied, the man drove to the hospital, where he was in stable condition Thursday, Stoots said. The bear disappeared before authorities arrived. Drought has wiped out food sources usually found in the wilderness, driving bears into foothill communities in search of their next meals. The drought, Stoots said, will push bears to go to “great lengths to find food and water.” Stoots said people should not leave food or water unattended near a home, and they should always keep trash away from their property.  – See http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-bear-attack-near-yosemite-20150813-story.html

Bear.dog.fightNew York 08/12/15 uticaod.com: by Carolyn Bostick – A man and his dog were injured during a bear attack by the Herkimer County border, according to the Fulton County Department of Environmental Conservation. Around 5 p.m. on Tuesday, a 55-year-old man from Troy was walking his small dog in the Stewart’s Landing in Stratford, when the unleashed dog encountered a bear. Stratford is located near the Town of Salisbury. The bear attacked the dog and the man was also attacked while trying to separate the animals. The man was able to strike the bear on the nose with a stick causing the bear to run away. Both the man and his dog suffered bites, scratches and puncture wounds. The injuries to the man are not considered life-threatening, DEC officers said. – For complete article see http://www.uticaod.com/article/20150812/NEWS/150819802

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER:


T_rmsf1 (2)Oklahoma
08/11/15 koco.com: by Morgan Chesky – It’s a holiday trip turned nightmare for a Shawnee family. A mother of two is now in a hospital and may never walk again after a disease took over her body in days. “She’s a beautiful, energetic fun person,” cousin Lisa Morgan said. “I mean nobody deserves this.” Four days after visiting Grand Lake, Jo Rogers thought she had the flu. On day five, her family took her to a hospital. “She was shaking her hands because they hurt, her feet hurt,” Morgan said. “They tested her for West Nile Virus and for meningitis.” Those results came back negative. By day six, doctors said Jo’s organs were shutting down. “By Saturday morning, her arms and feet were turning dark blue and black,” Morgan said. “It was crawling up her limbs.” And it was then someone thought to check for what may have happened just one week earlier, a tick bite that went unnoticed. The one tiny bite, enough for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever to ravage Jo’s body, forcing doctor’s to amputate her arms and legs. “Below the knee of her left leg and below both elbows of her arms,” said Morgan. “(They had) to save her life to keep the infection from getting to her vital organs.” – For video and complete article see http://www.koco.com/news/shawnee-mothers-trip-to-grand-lake-ends-with-tragedy/34661720

aaCDC-LogoBlogger’s Note: Patients who had a particularly severe infection requiring prolonged hospitalization may have long-term health problems caused by this disease. Rickettsia rickettsii infects the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. The damage that occurs in the blood vessels results in a disease process called a “vasculitis”, and bleeding or clotting in the brain or other vital organs may occur. Loss of fluid from damaged vessels can result in loss of circulation to the extremities and damaged fingers, toes or even limbs may ultimately need to be amputated. Patients who suffer this kind of severe vasculitis in the first two weeks of illness may also be left with permanent long-term health problems such as profound neurological deficits, or damage to internal organs. – See http://www.cdc.gov/rmsf/symptoms/index.html

TULAREMIA:

tularemia.rr7788rr3New Mexico 08/14 /15 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – New Mexico health officials are reporting three human cases of the bacterial infection, tularemia, in Bernalillo County, The patients, a 71-year-old man, a 39-year-old man and a 42-year-old woman, who have all recovered, contracted the disease via deer fly bites. .. In addition, officials have confirmed plague in a Santa Fe area dog, which was likely exposed to plague by infected rodents and their fleas while walking with its owner along the Santa Fe River between Frenchy’s Field and Siler. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/new-mexico-3-tularemia-cases-reported-in-bernalillo-county-plague-confirmed-in-santa-fe-dog-95777/

PLAGUE:

Santa_Fe_attacks_plagu48f91501Yosemite National Park 08/14/15 nbvcnews.com: by Maggie Fox – California’s Yosemite National Park has reopened one campground but is closing another to spray for fleas after a Los Angeles girl caught plague there. The child is recov ering, officials said. The park’s Crane Flat Campground, closed for four nights while teams treated rodent burrows for fleas, was reopening Friday, the California health department said. Tuolumne Meadows Campground in Yosemite will be closed from Monday to Friday next week for similar treatment after two dead squirrels were found to be carrying plague, the department said. “Although this is a rare disease, and the current risk to humans is low, eliminating the fleas is the best way to protect the public from the disease,” said Dr. Karen Smith, California’s chief medical officer. “By eliminating the fleas, we reduce the risk of human exposure and break the cycle of plague in rodents at the sites. People can protect themselves from infection by avoiding any contact with wild rodents.” – For complete article see http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/yosemite-closes-two-campgrounds-after-plague-case-n41021

RABIES:

Delaware 08/14/15 New Castle County: Thirteen people are being treated for exposure to rabies after a kitten found near Middletown tested positive for the deadly virus. State health officials say the rabies case is the eighth to be confirmed in Delaware this year. The kitten was found in mid-July. A family took care of the animal before taking it to a veterinarian. The kitten was unusually weak and died on Sunday night. The veterinary staff who handled the kitten and the family that took care of it are being treated for exposure to the virus, which is fatal if untreated. – See http://www.dailyjournal.net/view/story/1a469725900544508372f78d4692adb3/DE–Rabid-Kitten

6183687956_0905f1bf96_oFlorida 08/14/15 Sarasota County: The Sheriff’s Office animal services section is searching for a reportedly feral feline who attacked a man collecting his newspaper last week. At about 6:30 a.m. Aug. 5, Sam Giordano, 67, was outside his home on Salerno Street (in Venice), retrieving his newspaper, when a stray cat charged him from under his car and attacked his left leg, according to a report from animal services. The stray had attacked Giordano’s pet cat earlier that day. Giordano suffered “at least 20 large lacerations and about four puncture wounds,” according to the report. Animal services officers are trying to humanely trap the stray cat so they can monitor its behavior for signs of exposure to the rabies virus. The cat has lived in the area for about a year, according to the report. It resembles a “brown tiger looking cat.” If the stray cat is not captured by Sunday, the Sarasota County Health Department will advise Giordano on whether he needs to be tested or treated for the rabies virus, according to SSO spokeswoman Kaitlyn Johnston. – See http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20150814/ARTICLE/150819812

New York 08/12/15 Westchester County: Ossining P.D. Public Health Alert: On Monday August 10th we had an incident on Edward Street and Lafayette Avenue where a gray cat became aggressive with police officers and a few residents. The cat was captured a short while later and delivered to the Westchester County Department of Health. Today we were notified that the cat tested positive for rabies. A robo-call from the Department of Health will be going out to residents in the immediate area. If you, or someone you know, had contact with a stray gray cat in that area, and especially if you were bitten, scratched, or exposed to the cat’s saliva please call the Department of Health immediately at (914)813-5000. – See http://patch.com/new-york/ossining/aggressive-cat-tests-positive-rabies-ossining

GRIZZLY kills hiker at YELLOWSTONE ~ BLACK BEAR attacks hiker at VIRGINIA state park ~ BLACK BEAR attacks hiker on WASHINGTON military base ~ CANADA: BLACK BEAR attacks woman walking dog in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ FLORIDA woman loses arm in ALLIGATOR attack ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE scientist questions success of new EBOLA VACCINE

Bear ID Handout: Center for Wildlife Information, Montana.

Bear ID Handout: Center for Wildlife Information, Montana.

Yellowstone National Park 08/10/15 nydailynews.com: by Ashley Lewis – Yellowstone National Park officials are piecing together clues of a bear attack that left a seasoned Montana hiker dead on Friday. The 63-year-old hiker from Billings, Lance Crosby, was the first human to have an encounter with a bear in Yellowstone this year, a park spokeswoman told CNN.  Only four bear-related fatalities were reported from 2010 to 2014, the spokeswoman said. “We may not be able to conclusively determine the circumstances of this bear attack, but we will not risk public safety,” Dan Wenk, superintendent of Yellowstone National Park, said in a statement.  The man was reported missing on Friday when he was a no-show for work, officials said.

8520329_GA park ranger discovered his mutilated body a half mile from the Elephant Black Loop Trail near Lake Village, Wyo., authorities said. The man’s body was partially devoured, but officials said they found defensive wounds on his arms that indicate he didn’t go down without a fight. Paw prints at the scene point to an adult female grizzly and a cub as the culprits, authorities said. – For complete article and photos see http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/seasoned-hiker-attacked-killed-bear-yellowstone-article-1.2320577

Virginia 08/09/15 richmond.com: by Laura Kebede – A Midlothian woman survived a bear attack Saturday at Douthat State Park in Bath County that left her with 14 stitches in her back and 14 in her leg. An adult female black bear believed to be the attacker was tracked and killed early Sunday. The bear attack prompted the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation to close several miles of trails on the west side of state Route 629, which was scheduled to be reopened today. Laurie Cooksey was hiking Saturday with three of her four children after a day of canoeing and camping the night before. When they reached the Tuscarora Overlook and took a selfie, rain clouds were quickly forming, she said. So about 6 p.m., the foursome headed down the steep, windy trail — with Cooksey and her 19-year-old son Ellis walking ahead of her daughter Hannah Cate, 16, and son Blake, 22.

8877449Within five minutes, Ellis spotted the black bear peering at them from behind a tree about 10 yards away, Laurie Cooksey said. Almost immediately, the bear charged. They retreated in the opposite direction, but the bear caught up and headed them off. “He was fast. He was just so fast,” she said. The bear clawed Cooksey’s back and knocked her to the ground off the trail. “The saving grace was it was raining hard and the leaves were slippery,” she said. They both slid in the leaves and she found herself slightly uphill from the bear when it bit her twice on the leg. Cooksey kicked just enough for the bear to lose its balance on the incline and slide far enough away for Cooksey to make a run for it, she said. When they caught up with the other two who were unaware of the incident, the bear reappeared. But this time, Blake continually yelled “Get big! Get loud!” as he and Ellis screamed and jumped to intimidate the bear as they had been instructed in materials they received when they visited Yosemite National Park. It worked. The bear turned around. – For complete article see http://www.richmond.com/news/local/chesterfield/article_4ae3bf43-3cbd-5620-86c0-aaf08527cae4.html

JointBase1Washington 08/06/15 nwguardian.com: by Alexandra Kocik – A hiker and his 15-year-old son wandered into the wrong place at the wrong time Saturday at Training Area 15, near the East Gate Extension on Lewis Main. The two startled a black bear on the trail resulting in the animal attacking the man before the bear was scared away. After scaring the bear away, the man called 911 on his cell phone. The hiker is an Air Force Reservist assigned to a unit in Germany. He was able to drive to a nearby medical facility to get treatment for his injuries — scratches, lacerations and puncture wounds on his arms, legs and face. His son was not injured. Had it been a life threatening emergency, he would have been transported to Madigan Army Medical Center. Joint Base Lewis-McChord Provost Marshal Maj. Jay Cash said the hikers were in an approved area for hiking when they startled the bear. “It should be noted to anyone that JBLM training areas are known to be habitat for a numbers of black bears and other wildlife such as mountain lions,” he said. “They should not assume that these areas are free from risk. JBLM works hard to ensure our natural resources are protected while at the same time, safe for the public.” Cash said the injured hiker most likely startled the bear, which makes them aggressive. The military police are currently working with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife officers to determine if trapping and relocating the bear to another location is warranted. – For complete article see http://www.nwguardian.com/2015/08/06/21973/hiker-injured-in-bear-attack.html

CANADA:

374560763British Columbia 08/10/15 globalnews.ca: by Megan Turcato – A Willowbrook woman’s arm was broken when she was attacked by a black bear Wednesday while walking her dog in a park in the rural community near Oliver. She also suffered a scratch to her face as well as cuts and scrapes to her back. “[The bear] knocked her down to start with and she got some scratch marks on her back but they didn’t penetrate, just marks, and then it started to bite at her,” says the victim’s husband Joseph Treitl. “It did bite her really bad [in the forearm] and crunched some bones.” Luckily, the woman was able to escape when the bear chased her dog. Her dog was not hurt. “She was lucky that the dog distracted the bear because if he would’ve come back and started biting at her again, she would’ve been worse off,” says Treitl. The Conservation Officer Service says it was an unprovoked attack by an adult female black bear. Conservation officer Jim Beck says the bear appeared to be healthy and didn’t have any cubs with her. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/2156497/south-okanagan-woman-survives-bear-attack/

ALLIGATOR ATTACK:

15578446Florida 08/09/15 orlandosentinel.com: by Steven Lemogello – The alligator that attacked an Orlando woman swimming in the Wekiva River Saturday afternoon — biting off her arm just above the elbow — has been caught and euthanized, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said Sunday. The gator was caught at 12:25 a.m. Sunday morning, FWC spokeswoman Karen Parker said. The attack took place near Wekiva Island, which rents canoes and cabanas and serves drinks from an outdoor bar. The woman, who was identified Sunday as Rachael D. Lilienthal, 37, of Orlando, was swimming upstream away from a crowded beach area when she was bitten by an alligator, according to FWC officials. Lilienthal was bitten at least twice and her right arm was severed above the elbow, Parker said. A kayaker struck the alligator with a paddle and caused it to release its grip on Lilienthal. Two kayakers brought her to the marina, Parker said, where Seminole County deputies administered first aid. Lilienthal was taken to Orlando Regional Medical Center for treatment. Her condition is unknown. – For complete article see http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/breaking-news/os-update-alligator-attack-woman-wekiwa-springs-20150809-story.html

EBOLA VACCINE:

Global 08/11/15 theconversation.com: by Timothy P. Lahey – Ebola is on the run: the number of cases dipped below 10 a week  recently, and a few days ago investigators announced in the prestigious journal The Lancet  that a new Ebola vaccine was “100% effective.” In response, global health authorities are starting to sound a little giddy. “We believe that the world is on the verge of an efficacious Ebola vaccine,” said  Marie Paule Kieny, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) assistant director-general for health systems and innovation (and an author on the study). “It could be a game changer.”

ebola-vaccine-thumbnail-1280x768She’s right: this is wonderful news, and a great testament to human ingenuity. A genetically engineered hybrid  of the benign vesicular stomatitis virus and the Zaire strain of Ebola, together called rVSV-ZEBOV, was tested in a multi-site clinical trial conducted amid a massive aid response in Guinea, one of the poorest countries in Africa. The scientific and logistical acrobatics required to pull this off boggle the mind. Yet, for three reasons, we cannot know if the vaccine really worked, or how well. Those reasons are the lack of placebo comparison, the way the investigators diagnosed vaccine failure and the possibility of statistical flukes. – For lengthy article analyzing these three reasons see https://theconversation.com/news-about-the-success-of-a-new-ebola-vaccine-may-be-too-good-to-be-true-45801?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+August+11+2015&utm_content=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+August+11+2015+CID_71d509c2a891957a7c929ad7d07b8b63&utm_source=campaign_monitor_us&utm_term=News%20about%20the%20success%20of%20a%20new%20Ebola%20vaccine%20may%20be%20too%20good%20to%20be%20true

CONNECTICUT warns TICK disease called BABESIOSIS is spreading ~ CALIFORNIA confirms first WEST NILE VIRUS death this year ~ Second COLORADAN dies of PLAGUE ~ CALIFORNIA child recovering from PLAGUE ~ COLORADO pet CAT dies of PLAGUE ~ New data shows LYME DISEASE becoming more common in MINNESOTA ~ ALASKAN mauled by GRIZZLY while jogging ~ BEAR attacks man walking on Lewis-McChord military base in WASHINGTON ~ MICHIGAN confirms third DEER found with CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE ~ EBOLA VACCINE tests 100% effective in phase III trial ~ RABIES reports from CT, NJ & PA.

Courtesy US National Park Service.

Courtesy US National Park Service.

Connecticut 08/07/15 wtnh.com: by Kent Pierce – As you make plans to enjoy the great outdoors this weekend, keep this in mind: More and more ticks in Connecticut are testing positive for a disease called babesiosis. It spreads like Lyme disease, but acts more like malaria, and scientists say this past winter’s weather has brought out a bumper crop of ticks this summer. If deer are around, deer ticks are probably around, too. For years in Connecticut, we’ve known the danger of getting Lyme disease from deer ticks. Now there is a rising new threat. “Babesiosis was first documented in Connecticut in 1988,” according to State Entomologist Dr. Kirby Stafford III. “It has been slowly spreading across the state ever since.” Now that slow spread is picking up.

tick.44958749The Agricultural Experiment Station just started testing ticks for babesiosis, and it is finding about one in seven ticks has it. Babesiosis attacks our red blood cells. The elderly are especially susceptible. “You’re talking about high fever, you’re talking chills, headache and shakes,” explained Dr. Stafford. “You know, it’s kind of like having malaria.” If untreated, babesiosis can even be fatal. Connecticut had about 400 confirmed human cases in the past two years, but many more probably had it and didn’t know it. You can also get it from blood transfusions, because no one tests donated blood for babesiosis yet. If you get bit by a tick, it’s like Lyme disease in that it takes a day for tick to infect you. So the key is to find the tick as soon as possible. Or don’t get bitten at all. “Wear long pants, tuck them into pants,” advises Dr. Stafford. “I know it sounds geeky, but it works. Use a repellant, something Deet based or a clothing repellant.” Just as important as prevention is checking for ticks. If you’ve been hiking, camping, even gardening, check yourself, your kids, and your pets for ticks and remove them with tweezers right away. – See  http://wtnh.com/2015/08/07/new-tick-disease-found-in-connecticut/

WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV):

07cd7361057a7994e7e590e1fb0d3868ed6ff5ad-1California 07/31/15 turlockcitynews.com: A senior citizen from Nevada County has been confirmed as the first human death caused by WNV so far this year. – See https://turlockcitynews.com/news/item/5284-first-human-west-nile-virus-death-reported-in-california

PLAGUE:

Colorado 08/05/15 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – For the third time in two months, Colorado has reported a human plague case in a resident. Health officials with  The Pueblo City-County Health Department  confirmed an adult died from plague. This is the first Pueblo County resident to contract plague since 2004. This is the second fatality due to plague this year in Colorado. On June 8, 16-year-old Poudre High School student in Larimer County, Taylor Gaes, died from septicemic plague. . . While the investigation is still ongoing, the individual may have contracted the disease from fleas on a dead rodent or other animal. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/plague-strikes-colorado-for-the-3rd-time-this-year-50236/

Plague ecology, epizootic cycles, enzootic cycles

Plague ecology, epizootic cycles, enzootic cycles

California 08/06/15 ocregister.com: by Jenna Chandler – A child from Los Angeles County has contracted human plague after visiting wilderness areas in Northern California last month, including Yosemite. The child, whose age was not disclosed, is recovering after being treated in a hospital. He or she became ill after visiting Stanislaus National Forest and camping at Crane Flat Campground in Yosemite National Park in mid-July, state public health officials said Thursday. Plague – which leads to a high fever, chills, nausea, weakness and swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpit or groin – is caused by a bacteria and is infectious. But it does not usually spread person to person, and human cases of plague are rare, said Dr. Karen Smith, director of the California Department of Public Health. – See http://www.ocregister.com/articles/plague-676248-health-child.html

Colorado 08/06/15 San Miguel County: – by Mary Slosson – A domestic cat tested positive for the plague and died while in isolation at the San Miguel County Veterinary Clinic in Norwood last month, the San Miguel County Department of Health and Environment announced Wednesday. Nobody in the cat owner’s family has become ill following the death. The owners brought their cat to the vet after it started showing signs of illness. The cat was isolated and lab samples were sent to state health officials, who confirmed a diagnosis of the plague. The plague is spread by infected fleas, which can be carried and transmitted through animals like squirrels, chipmunks, prairie dogs and mice. Domestic animals can become infected if bitten by an infected flea or if they eat an infected rodent. – See http://www.telluridenews.com/news/article_4673f7d4-3c8d-11e5-9a87-1b3495c373a4.html

LYME DISEASE:

green-tick-logoMinnesota 08/06/15 kimt.com: by Katie Huinker – New data is available indicating Lyme disease is becoming more common in Minnesota. It is one of 14 states that has the majority of cases in the country. The number of Lyme disease cases varies from year to year, but overall the trend shows an increase since 2000. According to the Minnesota Department of Public Health, the highest number of cases was in 2013, with more than 1,400 cases reported. Each year numbers can be very different, it depends on public awareness, infection rates in ticks and tick distribution. – See http://kimt.com/2015/08/06/new-lyme-disease-data/

BEAR:

Alaska 08/06/15 nbcnews.com: by Kathryn Robinson – An Alaskan woman is recovering after being mauled by a grizzly bear while jogging with a co-worker late Tuesday night, authorities said. Gabbriele Markel, 20, and Kaitlin Haley, 26, were running on a trail along Skilak Lake, 50 miles south of Anchorage, when an adult grizzly bear came out of the thick brush next to the trail and attacked Markel, knocking her to the ground, police said. Police told NBC News the two women work at Alaska Wildland Adventures lodge and were about three-quarters of a mile from the lodge. Police spokeswoman Megan Peters said Haley ran back to the lodge for help while the bear was still on top of Markel.

grizzleysjfksaHaley and several other employees ran back from the lodge, armed with bear spray, and saw Markel walking towards them. The employees transported Markel across the lake via boat and met with emergency officials, Peters said. “She didn’t appear to have life-threatening injuries at the time but they can turn life threatening,” Peters said. “It’s always important to get them to the hospital as soon as possible.” Markel was airlifted to Providence Hospital and staff told NBC News she was upgraded to good condition Wednesday afternoon. – For complete article see http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/alaskan-woman-mauled-bear-while-running-co-worker-n404821

Washington 08/01/15 washingtontimes.com: A man walking in a restricted area on Lewis-McChord military base near Tacoma on Saturday was attacked by a bear but sustained only some scratches. Officials now want to know why the man was in that area. – See http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/aug/1/man-attacked-by-bear-at-joint-base-lewis-mcchord/

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD):

20110816__Identity_HuntHarvestHelpMichigan 08/06/15 hollandsentinel.com: The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced that a third free-ranging deer in Meridian Township in Ingham County tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The deer was a 5-year-old doe. All three CWD-positive deer detected thus far have been discovered within a mile of one another. Genetic analyses carried out by Michigan State University’s Molecular Ecology Laboratory indicate that all three positive animals were related as part of an extended family. Previous research has shown that CWD is often transmitted within family groups because of their close contact. Hunters are critical to helping the DNR understand the prevalence and geographic distribution of the disease. ”We need individuals who have always hunted in Ingham County and surrounding counties to keep hunting,” said Steve Schmitt, DNR wildlife veterinarian in a press release. “The DNR can’t fight this disease without their support. Hunters need to have their deer checked and tested so we can determine if this disease is established over a broad area or just persisting in a local pocket.” – For complete article see http://www.hollandsentinel.com/article/20150806/NEWS/150809512

EBOLA VACCINE:

ebola_Merck_SL.CDCGlobal 08/06/15 fiercevaccines.com: by Amirah Al Idrus – Merck’s Ebola vaccine, developed in tandem with NewLink Genetics and tested in a novel “ring study,” has protected 100% of patients from Ebola infection, according to interim results published in The Lancet on Friday. In the aptly named “Ebola ça suffit,” or “Ebola, that’s enough,” trial, all vaccinated individuals were protected against Ebola infection within 6 to 10 days of vaccination. The trial, conducted by a team that includes researchers from the WHO, the Health Ministry of Guinea, and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health among others, is ongoing, with more than 4,000 patients having already received the jab. – See http://www.fiercevaccines.com/

RABIES:

This is not the kitten in either of these reports.

This is not the kitten in either of these reports.

Connecticut 08/03/15 New Haven County: A stray kitten found in the vicinity of North High and Mill streets in East Haven has tested positive for rabies. The kitten was found on July 9. Anyone in this area who may have seen or taken in any stray kittens or cats is asked to contact the department at 203-481-4233 or animal control at 203-468-3249 immediately. – See http://www.nhregister.com/general-news/20150803/stray-kitten-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-east-haven

New Jersey 08/06/15 Hunterdon County: by PC Robinson – County health officials urge (Union Township) residents in the Baptist Church Road area to seek medical advice if they came in contact with a stray male calico kitten that tested positive for rabies on Aug. 4. Rabies is an often fatal disease spread through contact with an infected animal’s saliva. For more information, call 908-788-1351.

Forest_Animals_Wallpaper_-_BeaverPennsylvania 08/06/15 Lycoming County: by Marcus Schneck – A beaver  found along Pine Creek, near Ramsay, has tested positive for rabies, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. The department also called for anyone who may have been bitten or exposed to saliva, fluids or tissue from a beaver to call the Lycoming County State Health Center at 570-327-3400 from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. weekdays, or 1-877-724-3258 at any time.

RED WOLF population in decline once again ~ Woman in NEW MEXICO dies of PLAGUE ~ SQUIRREL in COLORADO tests positive for PLAGUE ~ CANADIAN woman victim of BEAR attack ~ MUSKRAT in COLORADO tests positive for TULAREMIA ~ TULAREMIA found in four NORTH DAKOTA counties.

Red Wolf and pups. Courtesy US Fish & Wildlife Service.

Red Wolf and pups. Courtesy US Fish & Wildlife Service.

Southeast US 07/25/15 wral.com: by Emery P. Dalesio – A revised population estimate puts the world’s only wild population of endangered red wolves at their lowest level since the late 1990s amid recent moves to protect the bigger, predatory relatives of dogs from hunters’ misdirected bullets. Once common in the Southeast, the red wolf had been considered extinct in the wild as of 1980 for reasons including hunting and lost habitat. In 1987, wildlife officials released captive-bred red wolves into the wilds of a federal tract in North Carolina. For years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that about 100 wolves roamed the land in coastal Dare, Hyde, Washington, Tyrrell and Beaufort counties and also drifted onto neighboring private property. Now the federal agency has drastically cut its population estimate to between 50 and 75 wild red wolves. The revision was the result of fewer breeding adult wolves producing fewer babies to replace those animals that die, FWS supervisory wildlife biologist Rebecca Harrison said. “The decrease is a reflection of two years in a row of very low pup production in combination with the standing mortality,” Harrison said. While in the past wildlife officials have found 30 to 50 pups a year, last year 19 were found and this year only seven, Harrison said. The wolves breed a single litter of pups annually that are born in the spring.

wmi.88e8e290rAn outside study last year of the red wolf recovery program by the nonprofit Wildlife Management Institute said it couldn’t determine the specific reasons for the red wolf decline. Over the past decade, there was a tripling of wolf deaths from gunshots, the report said. Illegal killings of red wolves was the leading cause of deaths over the first 25 years of the program, the report said, with shootings and poisonings making up 30 percent of their deaths. Most of the red wolf shooting deaths of breeding-aged red wolves happened during the last three months of the year just before the animals breed, the report said. Deer season also increases hunters in the forests in the fall. The threats to red wolves from gunfire have increased as coyotes — which are often confused for their bigger, endangered cousins — multiplied across the state into the red wolf’s range. North Carolina’s Wildlife Resources Commission in 2013 decided to allow coyote hunting at night on private land and under certain circumstances on public land. Conservationists said that resulted in the shooting deaths of red wolves since even experts often couldn’t distinguish them from coyotes in a distant flashlight’s glare. –  Read more at http://www.wral.com/wild-red-wolf-count-falls-as-fewer-parents-making-fewer-pups/14794393/#LKVu6mCc32VcrhaU.99

PNEUMONIC PLAGUE:

plague.322998New Mexico 07/24/15 santafenewmexican.com: by Anne Constable – State Health Department officials said Friday that a 52-year-old Santa Fe County woman died after testing positive for plague, and workers were going door to door in her neighborhood to inform other residents of the risk. But the Health Department would not release the name of the hospital where the woman was treated or the section of the county where she lived. The state’s Scientific Laboratory Division is conducting a test to confirm the woman’s suspected case of pneumonic plague, the rarest of the three forms of the bacterial disease, which is usually contracted from flea bites or rodent droppings. If the lab test proves positive, this would be the first human case of plague in New Mexico this year. Last year, there were two human cases of plague in New Mexico, and both patients — a 43-year-old woman from Rio Arriba County and a 57-year-old man from Torrance County — recovered. Between 2010 and 2014, there were nine cases in the state, three of them in Santa Fe County. Santa Fe leads the counties in New Mexico for human plague, with 59 out of 271 cases across the state from 1949 to 2014. – For complete article see http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/health_and_science/health-officials-santa-fe-county-woman-s-death-could-be/article_1bc73a49-0570-577f-8710-0e1fd23e5944.html

plague.53400445Colorado 07/25/15 kdvr.com: by Chris Jose – Jefferson County Public Health received confirmation on Friday that a squirrel located at 15th and Jackson (in Golden) tested positive for bubonic plague. Postings are being placed around the area today with information reminding citizens to take simple precautions to avoid exposure. Plague is a highly infectious bacterial disease carried by various types of wild rodents and is transmitted primarily by flea bites. Squirrels, rodents, prairie dogs and other mammals, such as rabbits and cats are susceptible to plague because they carry fleas. – For video and complete article see http://kdvr.com/2015/07/25/squirrel-in-golden-tests-positive-for-bubonic-plague/

CANADA:

BEAR ATTACK:

bear_activity_470x245Ontario 07/26/15 timminstimes.com: Ontario Provincial Police say a 60-year old woman was treated and released from hospital for injuries after being attacked by an “aggressive bear” near Matheson on Friday afternoon. Police said two women were walking in the cottage area of Watabeag Lake when they encountered the bear. The OPP news release said one of the women was attacked by the bear and sustained injuries requiring medical treatment at the Matheson hospital. The nature of the woman’s injuries was not described by police. “OPP officers attended the area and located the bear,” said the police news release. “The bear displayed aggressive tendencies toward the officers and the bear was destroyed by the officers as a result.” The woman who was attacked is from the Guelph area. Watabeag Lake is located approximately 40 kilometers south west of Matheson. – See http://www.timminstimes.com/2015/07/26/friday-afternoon-bear-attack-near-matheson

TULAREMIA (RABBIT FEVER):

muskrat3Colorado 07/24/15 denverpost.com: by Anthony Cotton – A dead muskrat found recently at the Lily Lake area in Rocky Mountain National Park tested positive for tularemia, park officials said Friday. According to Colorado health officials, as of late May, there were 11 reported human cases of tularemia. A naturally occurring bacterial disease transmitted by infected insects and ticks to rabbits, hares, muskrats, beavers and other small rodents, tularemia can also spread to humans and can cause serious clinical symptoms. – For complete article see http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_28374467/colorado-health-officials-tularemia-cases-record-breaking-pace

zoonosis_tularemia (2)North Dakota 07/24/15 valleynewslive.com: The ND Department of Health and the ND  Department of Agriculture, Animal Health Division, have received reports of two confirmed human cases of tularemia in LaMoure and Burleigh counties; one unconfirmed but likely positive human case in Stark County; a case in a squirrel from the Roosevelt Zoo in Minot; and cases in two primates from the Dakota Zoo in Bismarck. The Roosevelt and Dakota Zoos are taking precautions to protect their animals, staff and visitors from the disease. Visiting a zoo does not pose an increased risk to the general public. However, people are advised to follow guidelines against touching animals that are posted by the zoos, and to avoid direct contact with wild animals, such as rabbits and rodents, which are known carriers of tularemia. Tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, is caused by bacteria that are commonly transmitted to humans and animals by ticks and deer flies. Pets can also become infected if they consume the remains of an infected animal. Other means of infection in humans include skin contact with blood or tissue  of infected animals, inhalation of contaminated dust or aerosols, and ingestion of contaminated food or water. – For complete article see http://www.valleynewslive.com/home/headlines/Tularemia-Identified-In-Four-North-Dakota-Counties-318509531.html

RABIES:

cat-and-bat.4778t5California 07/25/15 Monterey County: A domestic cat that was reported dead on July 2nd by its owner, a City of Monterey resident, has tested positive for a strain of the rabies virus that is carried by bats. – See http://www.mercurynews.com/health/ci_28537775/monterey-health-department-confirms-rabid-cat-died-from

ALABAMA woman attacked by rabid BOB CAT ~ CANADIAN engineer survives GRIZZLY attack ~ TEXAS teen attacked by COYOTE ~ NEW MEXICO and WYOMING officials warn residents of TULAREMIA threat ~ Two ARIZONANS succumb to WEST NILE VIRUS ~ COLORADAN contracts BUBONIC PLAGUE ~ PLAGUE kills colony of PRAIRIE DOGS in UTAH ~ CDC researchers find LYME DISEASE is spreading farther south and west ~ CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE found in captive TEXAS DEER ~ OTHER RABIES REPORTS from NJ & TX.

Bobcat. Photo by Don DeBold. Wikimidia Commons.

Bobcat. Photo by Don DeBold. Wikimidia Commons.

Alabama 07/14/15 greenvilleadvocate.com: A bob cat that attacked a Sardis resident in the front yard of her Sweetwater Road home earlier in the week biting her on the arm and hip has tested positive for rabies. – For a lengthy account of the attack and how the bob cat was finally killed see http://www.greenvilleadvocate.com/2015/07/14/woman-survives-attack-by-rabid-bobcat/

GRIZZLY ATTACK:

Canada:

grizzly5British Columbia 07/17/15 cbc.ca: by Lisa Johnson – An engineer with a Vancouver logging company thought he was going to die yesterday as a mother grizzly bear tore the flesh of his arm and back, and tried to throw him in the air. But George Knoll, 41, survived thanks to quick thinking, his work boots and luck. Knoll, who works with A&A Trading, had been walking through the bush, flagging trees for logging along a creek at Burke Channel near Bella Bella, on B.C.’s Central Coast. At about 8:30 a.m. PT, he looked up and saw a mother grizzly bear and her cub. Because of the sound of the rushing water, he hadn’t heard the bear and her cub approach through the bush — nor had the bear heard him — until they were just six metres apart. “I knew I was in trouble, because of the cub,” said Knoll from his hospital bed in Vancouver Friday. Knoll said he tried to run backward and sideways to get away from the bear, but she charged him from below. “She basically tackled me,” he said. He tried to play dead, curling in a ball with his arms protecting his neck, but her teeth were ripping into the flesh of his arm and back as she tried to toss him “like a rag doll.” “I thought in my head, ‘This is it, I’m going to die, this thing is going to eat me,'” he said. “I thought, ‘Oh man, what a shitty way to go … I’m not going to see my daughter and my wife again.”

mapThe bear’s face was so close to his, Knoll could smell and feel her breath. “I remember distinctly the bad breath on that bear, smelled like rotten fish. Dirty fur.” Playing dead wasn’t working, he realized. “At that point … I thought I better do something, so I kicked her in the face.” Knoll kicked the bear twice in the snout with his caulk boots, the heavy spiked work boots often worn by loggers. She stopped attacking him immediately, retreating to pace and huff. There was blood on her snout, but Knoll didn’t know if it was hers, or his own. Another lunge, another kick, and the mother bear was gone. Help came quickly. Knoll radioed his partner to tell him of the attack, and he used a pressure bandage as a tourniquet on his left arm to stop the bleeding. He remembers being “delirious” walking the 200 metres uphill to a helipad, where the work crew’s helicopter airlifted him to Bella Bella, before he was flown to Vancouver. Sometime on the flight, he was able to call his wife. “I told her I loved her,” he said. Knoll is doing well in Vancouver General Hospital, with puncture wounds but no serious internal injuries, said Sgt. Len Butler of the B.C. Conservation Officer Service. Conservation officers are still investigating, but since the mother bear had a cub with her, they consider the attack to be “defensive” — meaning she wasn’t trying to prey on the engineer, and won’t be killed. –  For video see http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/grizzly-bear-attack-near-bella-bella-b-c-ends-with-kick-to-the-face-1.3157849

COYOTE ATTACK:

thumbnailcoydogTexas 07/15/15 nbcvdfw.com: by Julie Fine – Coyote sightings in North Texas are not all that unusual, but attacks are rare. Zane Weddell, 15, said he was walking out of a movie at the Cinemark Tinsletown Sunday night in Grapevine when he was bitten by a coyote. “I was like shocked there was a coyote,” he said. Zane said he and his girlfriend walked around the back of the theater, and the coyote came around the bushes. “It came at me, came at us, so I grabbed my shoe and I threw it at it, hit it, and it came back, came at me, so I like kicked it with my foot. And it got hold of my foot and shook me around a little bit, and it like let go and took off,” he explained. His mother was waiting for him at the front of the theater, so he ran to her car, where she saw blood on his foot. They then went to the emergency room, where Zane had five shots. – For video and complete article see http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Coyote-Bites-Teen-in-Grapevine-Movie-Theater-Parking-Lot-315116341.html

TULAREMIA (RABBIT FEVER):

New Mexico 07/13/15 kob.com: State officials today confirmed a case of tularemia in a 51-year-old Los Alamos County male resident who was hospitalized but has since recovered. Officials say there have also been 33 cases of the disease this year in pet dogs and cats from Bernalillo, Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Taos and Torrance counties. “Tularemia can cause serious illness in both people and pets.  I encourage people around the state to follow the same precautions they would to avoid contracting plague, which includes not handling sick or dead animals,” said Department of Health Cabinet Secretary, Retta Ward, MPH. “People can get tularemia if they handle infected animals such as rabbits or rodents or if they are bitten by infected ticks or deer flies.” Tularemia is a potentially serious illness in people that occurs in many parts of the United States. It is caused by a bacteria found in animals, especially rodents, rabbits and hares. Tularemia can also make dogs and cats sick and they can give the disease to people. Other possible, but much less likely, exposures are through contact with infected soil or water or by inhaling the bacteria. – For complete article see http://www.kob.com/article/stories/s3850814.shtml#.VaR0vflVhBc

tularemia33987ir6Wyoming 07/17/15 outbreaknewstoday.com: State officials issued a tularemia warning today after recent human and animal cases reported in northern Wyoming.  “Recently, we are hearing about rabbit die-offs and have seen tularemia cases confirmed in two Weston County residents, in dead voles near Devils Tower in Crook County and in a Washakie County cat,” said Dr. Tracy Murphy, state epidemiologist with WDH. “Tularemia is always a concern but is not common. To see this activity is concerning.” – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/tularemia-reported-in-weston-county-wyoming-residents-98356/

WEST NILE VIRUS:

07cd7361057a7994e7e590e1fb0d3868ed6ff5ad-1Arizona 07/17/15 azcentral.com: by Anthony Marroquin – Two Valley residents have died after contracting the West Nile virus, according to the Maricopa County Department of Public Health. The first victim was a man in his early 60’s and the second was a woman in her 70’s, the department said. Both were from the East Valley and had previous underlying health conditions. These were the first two deaths from West Nile virus in the 2015 season, according to the department.  – For complete article see http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2015/07/17/maricopa-county-west-nile-virus-deaths/30306825/

BUBONIC PLAGUE:

Colorado 07/20/15 themountainmail.com: by Paul J. Goetz – Chaffee County Health Department reported Friday that bubonic plague has been confirmed in a Chaffee County resident recently. The unidentified individual was hospitalized and has survived following intravenous antibiotic treatment, Susan Ellis, county health director, wrote in a press release. Identification of the disease was made by the state public health laboratory July 10. Colorado Department of Public Health reports that 17 human plague cases have been confirmed in Colorado since 2005. This would make the 18th case. Investigation revealed that the family dog became ill with symptoms consistent with plague a few days prior to the onset of illness in the dog’s owner. The dog has recovered and test results from the dog are pending. – For complete article see http://www.themountainmail.com/free_content/article_9a5d5224-2e9a-11e5-8845-abc56056813b.htmldog-hunting-01-medium

Utah 07/14/15 ksl.com: by Amy Joi O’Donoghue – Bubonic plague wiped out a colony of Utah prairie dogs in a remote area of the Uintah Basin, and health officials are urging residents to refrain from handling any of the dead rodents they may find. The plague outbreak, which is not uncommon in prairie dogs, was discovered last week in an area called Coyote Basin, southeast of Vernal, said Dax Mangus, wildlife program manager in the northeastern region for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. The outbreak killed a colony of between 60 and 80 prairie dogs. Mangus said the outbreak occurred in an area under monitoring because it is a site for the reintroduction of the black footed ferret, which prey on the dogs. The black footed ferret, North America’s only native wild ferret species, has been listed as endangered since 1967 and 90 percent of its diet is prairie dogs. – For video and complete article see http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=35498521

LYME DISEASE:

green-tick-logoNational 07/15/15 nbcnews.com: by Maggie Fox – Lyme disease is gradually spreading from the Northeast and becoming more common farther south and west, government researchers reported Wednesday. A county-by-county look at the infections shows it’s found in four times as many counties now as it was in 1993, a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. It’s not clear why – experts say climate change, forest regrowth and the spread of deer might all be factors. What is clear is that many more people than before need to watch out for the ticks that carry the infection, CDC says. “Over time, the number of counties identified as having high incidence of Lyme disease in the northeastern states increased more than 320 percent: from 43 (1993-1997) to 90 (1998-2002) to 130 (2003-2007) to 182 (2008-2012),” Kiersten Kugeler of the CDC’s center in Fort Collins, Colorado, and colleagues write in their report. The northern coast of New Jersey is no longer a hotbed of new Lyme infections, but now east-central Pennsylvania is, they said. Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, carried by blacklegged ticks. It was first recognized in the Lyme, Connecticut, area in 1975 and it’s spread from there to the northeast and to the mid-Atlantic and upper Northwest regions and elsewhere. The CDC found high-risk counties in 17 states, including Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, Iowa, Michigan and Minnesota. – For complete article see http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/lyme-disease-spreads-government-report-finds-n392626

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE:join

Texas 07/01/15 TX Parks & Wildlife: Media Release – A two-year-old white-tailed deer in a Medina County deer breeding facility has been confirmed positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). This is the first case of CWD detected in captive white-tailed deer in Texas. CWD was first detected in Texas in 2012 in free-ranging mule deer in the Hueco Mountains in far West Texas. The Medina County tissue samples submitted by the breeder facility in early June as part of routine deer mortality surveillance revealed the presence of CWD during testing at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) in College Station. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the findings on Tuesday, June 30. – For complete release see http://tpwd.texas.gov/newsmedia/releases/?req=20150701a

OTHER RABIES REPORTS:

New Jersey 07/15/15 Middlesex County: A feral cat found in the vicinity of Deans Lane and Route 1 in South Brunswick has tested positive for rabies. – For complete article see http://www.mycentraljersey.com/story/news/local/middlesex-county/2015/07/15/cat-tests-positive-rabies-south-brunswick/30206899/

78483649Texas 07/15/15 Wichita County: A litter of nine puppies advertised on Craigslist in Henrietta were all potentially exposed to the rabies virus. An individual from Wichita Falls who adopted one of the puppies was bitten and the puppy later tested positive for rabies. Of the 9 puppies exposed to rabies, 8 have been accounted for. The Health Department is still looking for the ninth puppy. Three of the located puppies are in Wichita Falls. Please contact the Health District immediately at 940-761-7833 or 7824 if you took one of these puppies home or was exposed to the litter in Henrietta. Also, if you know of someone that handled the puppies or took one home, please have them contact the Health District immediately. – For photo and complete article see http://www.texomashomepage.com/story/d/story/wichita-falls-puppy-tests-positive-for-rabies/31938/pLqt6PB8UkSLISqk0NMb5w

New LYME DISEASE research center opens in MARYLAND ~ Another COLORADAN succumbs to HANTAVIRUS ~ COLORADO officials confirm 11 cases of TULAREMIA this year ~ BEAR attacks camper at COLORADO campground ~ RABIES report from MARYLAND.

lymedisease.77394

Global 06/24/15 natureworldnews.com: A new research center focusing on the tick-borne Lyme Disease has opened in Baltimore. The Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center is the first such facility to be housed at a major US medical research center. Center founder and director John Aucott, a Johns Hopkins internist, said, ” “If you live anywhere from Maine to Virginia, it’s almost impossible for Lyme disease not to affect someone you know, someone in your family or yourself.”  The center’s first study will attempt to learn why some patients develop post-treatment Lyme Disease syndrome lasting months or years, while others do not. – For complete article see http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/15336/20150624/lyme-disease-research-now-home-johns-hopkins.htm

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

Colorado 06/25/15 washingtontimes.com: A south Weld County man who was working in an enclosed space in the presence of rodent droppings while repairing his home has died of Hantavirus Pulmonary syndrome. People can be infected by inhaling the virus after disturbing dust, feces or urine from mice nests or other contaminated areas. – See http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jun/25/weld-county-man-dies-after-contracting-hantavirus/

TULAREMIA:

zoonosis_TularemiaColorado 06/24/15 CO Dept of Public Health – Media Release – Officials have confirmed 11 human cases of Tularemia in the state so far this year. In all of 2014, there were 16 cases reported, and the worst year was 1983 with 20 cases. People can get tularemia if they handle infected animals, such as rabbits, rodents or hares, or are bitten by ticks or deer flies. They also can be exposed by touching contaminated soil, drinking contaminated water or inhaling bacteria. – For complete release see https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/14e26e2cfe86b38b

BEAR:

bear1jf99Colorado 06/26/15 denver.cbslocal.com: A camper sleeping in his tent at the Dearhamer Campground near Ruedi Reservoir east of Basalt was bitten by a bear on June 17th. Rangers said the camper had food inside his tent and in a cooler outside the tent. Officials have restricted the campground to “hard-sided campers” only. The Forest Service has food storage containers  at the campground and bear-proof trash dumpsters just 30 to 40 yards away from the site and all campers are encouraged to use them. – See http://denver.cbslocal.com/2015/06/26/bear-attacks-camper-at-ruedi-reservoir/

RABIES:

5731289-very-cute-child-with-a-cat-in-armsMaryland 06/26/15 Charles County: A stray cat found in the vicinity of Marshall Corner Road, near McDonough High School and Rose Hill Road, in Pomfret has tested positive for rabies. The cat was a black-and-white male of less than 20 pounds. – See http://www.thebaynet.com/articles/0615/local-cat-tests-positive-for-rabies.html

GRIZZLY attacks CANADIAN hiker in surprise encounter ~ BEAR attacks CALIFORNIA woman in her yard ~ COLORADO teenager dies of PLAGUE ~ Three COLORADO men contract TULAREMIA while working in their yards ~ RABIES reports from GA, MD, PA & VA.

Grizzly by Jean-Pierre Lavoie. Wikimedia-Commons.

Grizzly by Jean-Pierre Lavoie. Wikimedia-Commons.

CANADA:

British Columbia 06/18/15 cbc.ca: by Tamsyn Burgmann – A woman who surprised a grizzly while hiking up remote mountains in British Columbia’s Interior had no time to protect herself or prevent the bear attack, a conservation officer said. The bear lunged at the woman and bit her, breaking her arm in a “chance encounter” on Friday, said Len Butler of B.C.’s Conservation Officer Service. The bear was just trying to protect itself as it happened upon the woman and her boyfriend, he added. “They hiked along a trail, they were in some of the open meadows and there was a small little pass to go up through,” said Butler. “It was so quick. They did nothing wrong.”

cariboo_mapThe incident occurred about mid-afternoon while the pair from Williams Lake, B.C., was ascending in the Big Slide Mountain Area near the community of Horsefly, in the province’s Cariboo region. It was a blustery day, meaning winds were diffusing the hikers’ scents and obstructing the crunch of their boots along the foliage, said Butler. The couple emerged upon a knoll about the same time the animal arrived from the opposite direction uphill. The bear and hikers were only about seven to nine metres apart when they spotted each other. “They kind of stared at each other for a second, then the bear bluff-charged and stopped,” Butler said. “Then the bear lunged at the female, grabbed her arm, threw her to the side and the bear then just immediately ran off into the trees.” Butler described the bear’s reaction as standard and said it took the path of least resistance to escape. He said the woman, in her mid-20s, had bear spray holstered to her hip but simply couldn’t respond fast enough. – For complete article see http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/grizzly-bear-attack-terrifies-couple-hiking-near-horsefly-b-c-1.3117983


800px-Yellowstone-171California
06/23/15 contracostatimes.com: by Steve Schoonover – A woman and her dog were injured when they were attacked by a bear Monday night outside a home near Chico, in Butte County. At about 11:30 p.m. Monday a woman who lives in Magalia heard a noise in her yard and her dog began barking. She let the dog out, heard sounds of a fight and stepped out herself. According to California Department of Fish and Wildlife Capt. Patrick Foy, she said a bear immediately came out from beneath a blue tarp, clawed her on the shoulder and bit her before running off. The woman was taken to the hospital and treated for non-life-threatening wounds and given rabies treatment. The dog, a 9-year-old golden retriever, was taken to a veterinarian, and is in tough shape, according to Foy. “Sounds like he fought hardily,” Foy said of the dog. Fish and Wildlife are deploying a trap to the area to try and capture the offending bear. Foy said it should be in place by the end of the day. – For complete article see http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28366614/woman-and-dog-injured-bear-attack-near-chico

SEPTICEMIC PLAGUE:   

plague445654534Colorado 06/20/15 coloradoan.com: by Jason Pohl – A 16-year-old Poudre High School student who suddenly became ill this month died from a rare strain of plague. He is believed to have been the first Larimer County resident to have contracted the deadly disease since 1999, health officials say. An investigation is ongoing, but it is believed that Taylor Gaes contracted the septicemic plague from fleas on a dead rodent or other animal on the family’s land in the Cherokee Park area near Livermore, northwest of Fort Collins, Larimer County health officials confirmed to the Coloradoan Saturday. Septicemic plague occurs when bacteria enters the bloodstream directly — it is highly fatal and very rare in humans. Officials now are warning people who visited the family’s home after Gaes’ June 8 death — the day after his 16th birthday — to be extra vigilant. “There is a small chance that others might have been bitten by infected fleas, so anyone who was on the family’s land in the last seven days should seek medical attention immediately if a fever occurs. The last exposure to others was likely on June 14,” Larimer health officials said in a statement late Friday. – For completer article see http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/2015/06/20/officials-say-rare-form-plague-killed-poudre-student/29031569/

TULAREMIA (RABBIT FEVER):

Colorado 06/18/15 denverpost.com: by Jesse Paul – Two Weld County men were diagnosed with tularemia — also known as rabbit fever — this week and health officials believe both were most likely exposed while mowing or working in their yards. County health officials say one of the men is hospitalized while the other is recovering at home, according to a news release issued Thursday. The two have been identified as a 79-year old from Milliken and an 80-year old from Greeley. “We are seeing an unusually high number of human tularemia cases along the Front Range this year,” Dr. Mark E. Wallace, executive director of the Weld County Health Department, said in a statement. “The public really needs to be cautious and not get exposed to this disease.” A Boulder County resident who contracted tularemia last month after doing yard work later died. That person’s case was the first in Boulder County this year. In 2014, Colorado saw at least 11 cases of tularemia in humans, more than three times the previous average in the state, according to county health data. – See http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_28337050/2-weld-county-men-tularemia33987ir6diagnosed-tularemia-this-week

Colorado 06/23/15 kvnf.org. by Laura Palmisano – A Delta County man is recovering after contracting tularemia. Although it’s the first reported case of the disease on the Western Slope this year, health officials are concerned . . . So far this year, 11 people have contracted the disease (statewide). Health officials said one of the most recent cases involves a Delta County man who likely got exposed to it while excavating dirt on his property. – For complete article see http://kvnf.org/post/delta-county-sees-first-human-case-tularemia-health-officials-concerned

RABIES:

Georgia 06/16/15 Thomas County: A stray cat that bit two adults within a block of each other in a Raleigh Avenue neighborhood in Thomasville has tested positive for rabies. An elderly woman and a middle-aged man are being treated for exposure to the virus. – See http://www.timesenterprise.com/news/local_news/rabid-cat-confirmed-in-the-city/article_366a7f2c-1481-11e5-8309-8bda5d1ece15.html

Maryland 06/23/15 City of Baltimore: A stray cat trapped in Fort Armistead Park in Brooklyn on June 10 has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wbaltv.com/news/stray-cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-feralcat.3399rir778baltimore/33735152

Pennsylvania 06/18/15 Lehigh Valley: A stray cat that bit a woman who had been feeding it and others in the Luna Street area of Bethlehem has tested positive for rabies. “I strongly recommend that citizens never feed wildlife, stray or feral cats, or stray dogs, or attempt to handle any animal that is not their own,” Bethlehem Health Director Kristen Wenrich said in a statement. – See http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/bethlehem/index.ssf/2015/06/stray_cat_that_bit_bethlehem_r.html

Virginia 06/19/15 Spotsylvania County: A stray cat that bit a person after it was picked up near a gas station in the 11000 block of Leavells Road has tested positive for rabies. The cat is described as a male, orange tabby cat about 1½ years old. – See http://patch.com/virginia/fredericksburg/health-warning-rabies-case-confirmed-county-0?