Tag Archives: Cats

58 WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) related deaths in the U.S. so far this year ~ RABBIT FEVER cases continue to rise in COLORADO ~ Study finds LYME DISEASE infected TICKS and MAMMALS in NEW YORK’s Adirondack Park ~ CATS three times more likely to contract RABIES than DOGS ~ Other RABIES reports from GA, NC, OH, SD, VA & CANADA: ONT.

West Nile Virus Activity by State – United States, 2014 (as of October 28, 2014)

West Nile Virus Activity by State – United States, 2014 (as of October 28, 2014)

National 10/30/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – Just to keep things in perspective in the United States, the mosquito borne virus that originated in Africa, West Nile virus (WNV) has killed 1,668 people from its first appearance in  the states in 1999 through 2013. That’s 111 fatalities per year average for a disease that prior to 1999, the vast, I mean vast majority of Americans had no clue existed. During that period we saw some 40,000 human cases of the disease as it spread across the nation and as far north as Canada. We’ve had some mild years and some pretty severe years–almost 10,000 cases nationwide were seen in 2003, while two years ago, the state of Texas saw almost 2,000 cases alone. Currently, the number of human WNV cases stands, ironically at 1,668 as of Oct. 28, including 58 deaths. California to date is 2012’s Texas, leading the nation in both cases (654) and deaths (22).

wnv1_clip_image002First discovered in Uganda in 1937, West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause encephalitis, a brain inflammation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 80 percent of people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with WNV will not show any symptoms at all. Up to 20 percent of the people who become infected have symptoms such as fever, headache, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days, though even healthy people have become sick for several weeks. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will develop severe illness. The severe symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent. There is no specific treatment for WNV infection. WNV is indigenous to Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia and now North America. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/west-nile-virus-deaths-in-us-now-58-15228/

TULAREMIA aka RABBIT FEVER:

A Mountain Cottontail rabbit.

A Mountain Cottontail rabbit.

COLORADO 10/27/14 cpr.org. by Pat Mack – The number of human cases of the bacterial disease, tularemia, continues to rise in Colorado. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment now reports 12 confirmed cases of the disease also known as ‘rabbit fever’ so far this year, with many more suspected. Normally, the state sees four cases a year. “We haven’t seen this many tularemia cases in Colorado since the 1980s,” said State Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Jennifer House. “Historically, we see cases of tularemia in hunters, and the disease is so widespread this year, we want to make sure our hunters understand the risks.” The state health department believes tularemia may have spread to 30 counties in the state. Health officials say people can get the disease if they handle infected animals like rabbits and rodents, or are bitten by infected ticks or deer flies. Hunters are most at risk when skinning game and preparing and eating the meat. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.cpr.org/news/story/state-rabbit-fever-cases-spiking-hunters-should-take-care

LYME DISEASE:

T_lyme_disease518d6New York 10/23/14 adirondackalmanack.com: by Mike Lynch – Researchers from Paul Smith’s College are finding Lyme Disease in ticks and small mammals in the Adirondack Park. Paul Smith’s College professor Lee Ann Sporn is heading her college’s involvement in a Lyme Disease study that includes the state Department of Health and Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake. Trudeau is working to develop a vaccine for Lyme, while Sporn and students are monitoring the disease by testing mammals and ticks for it. Researchers hope to get a better understanding of the biology of the disease, where it is found geographically, and what factors are influencing its spread. So far, Sporn said that some of the test results have surprised her, including that a high percentage (eight of twelve) of small mammals tested positive for Lyme Disease in Schroon Lake.  The animals — mainly mice, shrews and voles — were trapped in the wild

paulsmiths-logoOther results include five of eight animals in Queensbury testing positive. Further south outside the Park, four of twelve animals in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve were found with Lyme. Up north, two of twenty-two small mammals in Paul Smith’s tested positive, while one of twenty-seven animals from Black Brook were found with Lyme. Paul Smiths, located 10 miles north of Saranac Lake, is at an elevation of roughly 1,650 feet, the highest site in the study. “We were surprised to find positive animals at Paul Smiths and at Black Brook because we’re out in the field all of the time, and we’ve never seen deer ticks here,” Sporn said. “We thought this would be our negative, but it wasn’t. So now that we do know there were positive ticks here, we are talking about looking at higher elevations.” – For complete article see http://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2014/10/researchers-finding-lyme-disease-in-adirondacks.html

RABIES:

Cat-And-Dog-Wallpaper-91National 10/23/14 myedmondsnews.com: It is now clear that in the U.S. cats are more often diagnosed with rabies than dogs. The number of verified cases of rabies in cats has increased and now there are three times as many cat cases reported compared to the diagnosis in dogs. The AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association) says that approximately 34-37 percent of families or individuals with pet cats do not take those animals to a veterinarian. The likelihood of those animals being vaccinated to prevent rabies is low to nonexistent. At least a third of all cats not vaccinated? That is a troubling statistic made even more so by cat owners who do take their animals to a veterinarian but have failed to have them vaccinated against rabies. This is not a rare disease. In 2010 fewer cases of rabies were reported compared to previous years in the U.S., but there were 6,153 cases in animals from 48 states and Puerto Rico verified. Raccoons were most commonly diagnosed (36.5 percent), skunks (23.5 percent), bats (25.2 percent), foxes (7.0 percent) and the rest in other species including some rodents. Domestic animals accounted for 8 percent of all verified cases and we still have two or three cases in humans every year. – For complete article see http://myedmondsnews.com/2014/10/ask-edmonds-vet-cats-rabies/

Georgia 10/29/14 Fulton County: A case of rabies has been confirmed in Roswell. What’s concerning is that it was found in a cat. Channel 2’s Wendy Corona visited the vet who saw it firsthand and says there may be a bigger issue. Dr. Michael Ray took a feral cat in last Tuesday. That cat was known to live out in the woods with no human contact. Ray said the man who brought the cat in told him the cat just let herself be taken,  which was strange to him. “But even more disturbing than that was how she was behaving. This is a cat that really couldn’t be touched and she was nonresponsive,” Ray said. After further examination, the feral cat appeared to have paralytic rabies. She was euthanized and days later a test confirmed rabies. Ray says it’s the first case he has seen in a cat from that area in his 18-year career. “I would be concerned about maybe a rabid fox, or rabid skunk or rabid raccoon,” he said. Corona visited the area near Holcomb Bridge Road where the cat was found and saw other cats near homes and one in the woods. This case brings attention the need to vaccinate pets for their security. – For complete article see http://www.wsbtv.com/news/news/rabies-found-cat-roswell/nhtz8/

North Carolina 10/29/14 Wilkes County: Two young children and others are receiving post-exposure prophylaxis rabies shots after a stray cat that appeared in the Byrd Ridge Road area off N.C. 18 North tested positive for rabies, said Wilkes Animal Control Director Junior Simmons. Simmons said a person who lives on Byrd Ridge Road called the Wilkes Animal Shelter Saturday to report that the male long haired blue-gray cat had bitten a young child and that the cat appeared to be injured. He said an animal control officer picked up the cat but that it couldn’t be sent to the state lab in Raleigh for testing until Monday. The cat was euthanized on Monday and sent that day and results showing it had rabies came back Tuesday. Animal control officers learned that another young child on Byrd Ridge Road had been bitten by the cat. Simmons said this other child and several other people who had contact with the cat in the Byrd Ridge Road area are getting post-exposure prophylaxis rabies shots. So far 21 people need to be assessed to determine if they need post-exposure prophylaxis rabies shots. Several pet dogs and cats that may have had contact with the rabid cat were euthanized at the request of owners and others have been quarantined to see if they have rabies. – For complete article see http://www.journalpatriot.com/news/article_4c745c0c-5f9b-11e4-help984-05834a922-001a4bcf6878.html

Ohio 10/29/14 Tuscarawas County: The New Philadelphia City Health Department is looking for a dark gray/tiger cat with a red collar that was in the vicinity of the 500 block of Fourth Street NW, between Minnich Avenue and Park Avenue NW. The cat bit a woman Wednesday. Because of that, the cat needs to be in rabies quarantine until Nov. 8. If the cat cannot be located for observation, the woman likely will need to undergo post-exposure rabies inoculations. If anyone has any information concerning this cat or its whereabouts, contact the New Philadelphia City Health Department at 330-364-4491, ext. 208; the New Philadelphia Police Department at 330-343-4488 or the Tuscarawas County Dog Warden at 330-339-2616. – See http://www.timesreporter.com/articlehelp984-05834/20141029/NEWS/141029151/10675/NEWS

South Dakota 10/31/14 Minnehaha County: Sioux Falls police are asking for the public’s help in finding a six month old Chocolate Labrador that bit a 4-year-old Tuesday at Menlo Park. The incident happened about 5:30 p.m. The dog ran into the park and bit the child, then ran to the east, police said. Police are attempting to find the dog to verify rabies vaccination. Anyone who sees a dog matching the description is asked to call police. – See http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/crime/2014/10/31/police-searching-dog-bit-year-old/18257543/

Virginia 10/29/14 Warren County: by Josette Keelor – A cat in Warren County has tested positive for rabies. On Oct. 15, the cat, described as a domestic short hair, yellow and white in color, attacked three people in the vicinity of Va. 649 or Browntown Road and Va. 622 Buck Mountain Road/Liberty Hall Road, according to a news release from the Warren County Health Department. This is the fifth cat that has tested positive for rabies in Warren County this year. – For complete article see http://www.nvdaily.com/news/2014/10/confirmed-warren-county-rabies-case-reminds-of-risk.php

Canada:

page_grey_bruce_health_unit_logo_28Ontario 10/29/14 Bruce County: The Grey Bruce Health Unit is asking for the public’s help in tracking down a dog involved in a biting incident. It happened Monday at about 9:30 AM as a man walked on Huron Terrace Road where it becomes Penatangore Row in Kincardine. He was bitten by a dog being walked by a young man. The dog is described as a medium-sized brown and tan mixed breed. The victim couldn’t get any information from the owner. Staff of the Grey Bruce Health Unit need to confirm the dog is not infectious with rabies. By verifying the health of the dog, the victim can avoid receiving the post-exposure rabies treatment. If you have any information about the incident, you are asked to contact the Grey Bruce Health Unit at 519-376-9420. – See http://www.bayshorebroadcasting.ca/news_item.php?NewsID=70254

CONNECTICUT woman attacked by RABID BOBCAT ~ FLORIDA confirms 3 new locally-acquired cases of DENGUE FEVER ~ FLORIDA confirms 7th locally-acquired case of CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from LA & NJ ~ RABIES reports from CO & FL.

Bobcat. Courtesy WI Dept of Natural Resources.

Bobcat. Courtesy WI Dept of Natural Resources.

Connecticut 09/01/14 foxct.com: by Samantha Schoenfeld – A woman was attacked by a bobcat in Bozrah on Saturday, Aug. 30, according to Cindy Chanaca, a spokeswoman from the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. She was attacked in her backyard on Stanton Hill Road, and was then taken to Backus Hospital in Norwich for treatment, but there’s no word on the extent of her injuries. DEEP did not find a bobcat in Bozrah, but on Sunday the department’s Environmental Conservation Police responded to reports of a bobcat sighting in Lebanon on Sunday. The calls came from the area of Norwich Avenue and Waterman Road. ENCON euthanized the bobcat. ENCON believes it is the same one that attacked the woman because of the close proximity to Stanton Road and because the bobcat had injuries consistent with the attack on the woman.

index 09/02/14: The bobcat tested positive for rabies. DEEP Environmental Conservation Police and wildlife experts released the following information about bobcats: Bobcats are common in Connecticut and found in most towns throughout the state. They are secretive, solitary and seldom observed, tending to hunt and travel in areas of thick cover.   Compared to many wildlife species, bobcats rarely cause conflicts with human activities and rarely contract rabies.  For more information visit:  www.ct.gov/deep/bobatfacts

For photos and original article see http://foxct.com/2014/09/01/bobcat-attacks-woman-in-bozrah/

 

Dengue Fever:

Florida 08/29/14 FL Health Miami-Dade County: Media Release – Officials are urging residents to take precautions against mosquito-borne illness following the investigation of three additional locally-acquired cases of dengue fever. Dengue-Fever_10459The three cases include a 49-year-old and two 64-year-old individuals. This brings the total of locally-acquired dengue cases for 2014 in Miami-Dade County to four. – See http://www.dadehealth.org/public/PUBLICnewsarticle.asp?newsID=2226&typeID=&news_type=Press+Releases

Chikungunya Fever:

Florida 08/29/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: State officials have confirmed a seventh locally-acquired case of chikungunya fever in the state, and the second case in St. Lucie County. The person was hospitalized but is recovering. In addition to the two autochthonous cases in St. Lucie County, one autochthonous case was reported in a Miami-Dade resident in June, and four autochthonous cases have been confirmed in Palm Beach County. – See http://outbreaknewstoday.com/st-lucie-county-confirms-2nd-local-chikungunya-case-floridas-7th-local-transmission-27521/

 

West Nile Virus (WNV):

LA-DHHLouisiana 08/29/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed nine new human cases of WNV, of which five were neuro-invasive disease cases, bringing this year’s total to 61 reported infections. Louisiana continues to have the nation’s second highest number of WNV neuro-invasive disease cases. This week’s new infections include five neuro-invasive disease cases, all in East Baton Rouge Parish. There were four new cases of West Nile fever; Ascension (1), Caddo (1) and East Baton Rouge (2) parishes. – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3100

NJDOH-LogoNew Jersey 08/22/14 NJ Dept of Health: Mosquito-borne virus Update – So far this year officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV in the state in the following counties: Gloucester and Monmouth. – See http://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/westnile/documents/results_aug22_14.pdf

 

Rabies:

jimwhitejrasaboyholdingbatHelpCardColorado 09/01/14 Pueblo County: Health officials in Pueblo County are urgently asking for the public’s help in identifying children who played with a rabid bat over the weekend. According to the Pueblo City-County Health Department, the children were playing with the bat between Wednesday and Sunday at the Sangre de Cristo Housing Apartments. Officials said contacting the children is “critical” and that they need to identify the kids “immediately.” – See http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_26447892/pueblo-health-officials-urgently-seek-kids-who-played

3610192083_22eaf9db7aFlorida 09/01/14 Suwannee County: Health officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a cat tested positive for the virus. The alert covers an area in the county that is south of Highway 90 and West 185th Road. – See http://www.wtxl.com/news/rabies-alert-issued-in-suwannee-county/article_df716a44-3224-11e4-8467-0017a43b2370.html

COLORADAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ Second person in SASKATCHEWAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ CHIKUNGUNYA cases in the CARIBBEAN top half-million mark ~ ARIZONA warns of PSITTACOSIS in LOVEBIRDS ~ RABBITS and CATS in COLORADO positive for TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) numbers NATIONALLY and WNV reports from ND, SD & TX ~ Interesting RABIES cases reported in GAx2, KS, MDx2 & NJ.

Deer Mouse. Courtesy CDC.

Deer Mouse. Courtesy CDC.

Colorado 08/05/14 Eagle County: A 41-year-old man had lived in Eagle County for only two months before hantavirus killed him. Manuel Hernandez was from Mexico and was here on a work visa. His death makes him Eagle County’s first case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome since 2005, said Jennifer Ludwig, the county’s public health director. Coroner Kara Bettis said Hernandez’s manner of death was natural. He died a couple weeks ago, Bettis said. The investigation took that long because the Centers for Disease Control requires two sets of lab results to confirm a hantavirus death. “Hantavirus causes death in approximately 40 percent of cases,” Ludwig said. – For complete article and more re Hantavirus see http://www.vaildaily.com/news/12488973-113/hantavirus-rodent-areas-cases

Canada 08/05/14 Saskatchewan: An adult in the northern tier of the province has died after contracting hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. It is the second death and fourth case reported in the province so far this year. Hantavirus can be transmitted by breathing in contaminated airborne particles from the droppings, urine and saliva of infected deer mice and certain other rodents that carry the disease. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Second+hantavirus+death+reported+Saskatchewan/10091160/story.html

Chikungunya Fever:

image[3]Western Hemisphere 08/04/14 cidrap.umn.edu: by Robert Roos – The tally of chikungunya cases in the Caribbean climbed by nearly 38,000 last week, topping the half million mark, with the Dominican Republic again contributing most of the increase, according to an Aug 1 update from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). The total reached 513,393 cases, compared with 473,523 a week earlier, an increase of 37,870, or 8.0%. Those numbers include suspected and confirmed illnesses that are locally acquired and imported cases. The vast majority of them—508,122 as of Aug 1—are suspected local cases. The Dominican Republic accounted for 26,012 of the new cases last week and more than half of all cases, with an overall total of 307,933, according to PAHO. Neighboring Haiti had only 50 new cases last week, all classified as suspected, for a total of 64,709. The death toll in the epidemic, which began last December, grew by 6, to 32. All 6 deaths were in Martinique, where the toll is now 19. The country’s overall case count reached 54,075, or 3,620 more than the week before. The total of confirmed local cases actually dropped by 524 last week, from 5,260 to 4,736, largely because of a decrease in French Guiana. The tally of confirmed local cases there sank from 665 to 89, while suspected cases jumped from zero to 1,194 and imported cases dropped from 216 to zero. Another Caribbean country that had a sizable jump in cases was Guadeloupe, where the total rose by 6,740, to 71,068.

joint_painIn Central America, El Salvador reported 376 new cases for a total of 2,353. Puerto Rico reported 390 new suspected cases for a total of 1,033. The numbers of confirmed and imported cases stayed the same at 215 and 17, respectively. As for the United States, PAHO listed 380 imported cases, or 18 fewer than the 398 reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Jul 30. The nation has had four locally acquired cases, all in Florida, including two reported last week. Meanwhile, imported cases in Mexico reached 380, an increase of 98, with local cases staying at 2. Venezuela reported 86 cases, with 30 local confirmed and 56 imported ones, compared with 57 a week earlier, according to PAHO. – See http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2014/08/caribbean-chikungunya-cases-climb-8-top-500000

Psittacosis:

Agapornis_-probably_a_hybrid-5iArizona 08/05/14 azcentral.com: by Chris Williams – Arizona Game and Fish Department officials want the public to be aware of a potential health threat following the discovery of the disease psittacosis, also known as parrot fever, in dead lovebirds in Scottsdale. Recently a Scottsdale homeowner reported finding 20 dead lovebirds in his yard. Game and Fish test results came in Friday, showing the birds had psittacosis. The disease can spread to humans and be difficult to diagnose. Last summer, it infected an east Mesa woman who used a leaf blower to clean up after some messy lovebirds, according to Game and Fish. She came down with a mysterious respiratory condition doctors had a tough time figuring out. When Game and Fish discovered psittacosis in dead birds on her property, that gave doctors the information they needed to diagnose her. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/scottsdale/2014/08/05/12news-parrot-fever-psittacosis-scottsdale/13624329/

Tularemia:

imagesCAC3YRG5Colorado 08/03/14 Montrosepress.com: Wild rabbits and two domestic cats in Montrose County have tested presumptively positive for tularemia, which can be transmitted to humans, most commonly through handling infected animals. – See http://www.montrosepress.com/news/county-warns-of-tularemia-after-cats-turn-up-positive/article_c1f3e8e8-1acd-11e4-8967-001a4bcf887a.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

West+Nile+Virus55447National 08/01/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – California has accounted for 33 percent of the at least 60 confirmed human West Nile virus (WNV) cases reported nationally, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The Golden State has reported 20 human WNV cases to date from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Fresno (4), Kern (1), Lake (1), Orange (3), Solano (1), Stanislaus (5) and Tulare (3). . . . To date, three people have died from complications due to WNV–Arizona, Louisiana and Missouri. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/california-accounts-for-a-third-of-all-human-west-nile-virus-cases-99491/

North Dakota 08/05/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The patient is a female in her 50s residing in Richland County. – For complete release see http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-08-05-WNV%20First%20Human%20Case%202014%20NR%20-%20v%20FINAL.pdf

South Dakota 08/05/14 SD Sept of Health: Officials have confirmed 12 human cases of WNV statewide so far this year. – For details, including counties reporting one or more cases see http://doh.sd.gov/documents/diseases/WNVupdate8-5.pdf

Texas 08/06/14 TX Dept of State Health: Officials have confirmed 15 human cases of WNV statewide so far this year. Seven cases are the more severe neuro-invasive form and eight cases are the milder fever form of the disease. Montgomery County alone has reported a total of six cases. – For a list of the other eight counties reporting WNV, and more re WNV, see https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/updates.shtm

Rabies:

RabidgoatGeorgia 08/04/14 Pike County: A goat, which was part of a herd of 17 stabled on McCrary Road in Molena has tested positive for rabies. Family members have received post-exposure vaccinations. – See http://www.pikecountygeorgia.com/archives/4765-Case-of-rabies-confirmed-in-Molena.html

Looking-for-Kittens-001Georgia 08/05/14 Hall County: A cat in the Gillsville Highway area of the eastern part of the county has tested positive for rabies. Two people are being treated after being exposed to the virus. – See http://www.cbs46.com/story/26201097/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-hall-county

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAKansas 07/29/14 Lyon County: A cow stabled in the county has tested positive for rabies. – http://cjonline.com/news/2014-07-29/rabies-confirmed-lyon-county-cow

 

3610192083_22eaf9db7aMaryland 07/28/14 Wicomico County: A feral kitten that scratched a Pittsville resident on Friendship Road has tested positive for rabies. Area residents are reported to have said “the (feral) cat population has become a big problem in town.” – See http://www.wboc.com/story/26132372/rabies-clinic-scheduled-after-rabid-cat-found

help_signMaryland 07/28/14 Frederick County: (Health officials are) searching for the owner of a dog that repeatedly bit a man Saturday night in Frederick.  The incident happened Saturday, July 26, 2014 around 10 p.m. near Hillcrest Drive at Hill Street Park. The FCHD said they need to speak with the owner of the dog so that the bite victim may avoid receiving unnecessary post-exposure rabies vaccinations.  The dog is described as a brownish, medium-sized, medium hair length, possible pit bull-mix that was not leashed. The dog was wearing a collar, officials say.  Anyone who has information about the owner’s identity is asked to call the FCHD at 301-600-1717 or Frederick County Animal Control at 301-600-1544.  Human cases of rabies are fatal if untreated. If you or someone in your family is bitten or scratched by a dog or cat, you should contact FCAC for assistance.  – See http://www.your4state.com/story/d/story/man-bitten-by-dog-in-frederick-officials-search-fo/27729/sDWUr9x_M0mhe3VD1SEH0g

IMG4336e-L-001New Jersey 07/30/14 Burlington County: A kitten in the township of Medford that has tested positive for rabies has reportedly exposed at least 13 people to the virus, all of whom must now receive post-exposure prophylaxis treatment. At least three other cats and a dog were also exposed and will be quarantined for six months. – See http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/rabies-alert-issued-in-medford-after-kitten-tests-positive/article_9e211201-9ad0-5474-980d-8d7f128dfe1e.html

 

FLORIDA WOMAN diagnosed with first locally acquired case of DENGUE FEVER this year ~ NEW MEXICO WOMAN contracts TULAREMIA ~ RABIES report from CT, NY & NC.

miamidade2

Florida 07/09/14 FL Dept of Health/Miami-Dade County: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first locally acquired case of Dengue Fever in the county so far this year. The individual has fully recovered. – See http://www.dadehealth.org/public/PUBLICnewsarticle.asp?newsID=2219&typeID=&news_type=Press+Releases

Author’s Note: According to Local10 News, the individual is a 50-year-old woman, and there were 23 confirmed cases of locally acquired dengue in Florida last year. – See http://www.local10.com/news/dengue-fever-case-confirmed-in-miamidade-county/26864992

Tularemia:

ico_TularemiaNew Mexico 07/10/14 krwg.org: State officials today confirmed a case of tularemia in a 65-year-old female resident of Bernalillo County. The woman was hospitalized but has since recovered. At least 7 household pets have also been diagnosed with tularemia so far this year, 4 dogs and 3 cats from Santa Fe, Bernalillo and Los Alamos counties. – See http://krwg.org/post/serious-illness-found-people-and-pets-new-mexico

Rabies:

6183687956_0905f1bf96_oConnecticut 07/09/14 New Haven County: A 3-month-old gray tabby kitten that bit two people has tested positive for rabies. The kitten was found screeching and acting strangely on a lawn along Hickory Road in Derby on July 5th. About ten others have had direct contact with the kitten’s saliva and other body fluids, and at least three dogs were also exposed. – See http://wtnh.com/2014/07/09/several-come-in-contact-with-rabid-kitten/

help7689New York 07/10/14 Erie County: Steve Goodwin of Buffalo is looking for the owner(s) of a pit bull that attacked his dog on July 6th in the Nottingham Woods area of Delaware Park, near Lincoln Parkway. Goodwin grabbed the pit bull by the mouth to free his dog. which was being bitten on the throat. Now his concern is whether or not the pit bull has been vaccinated for rabies. The two people the pit bull was with drove away without providing Goodwin with any information. – For more details see http://wivb.com/2014/07/09/couple-searches-for-pit-bull-owner-after-attack/

redfox-aug09North Carolina 07/08/14 Cumberland County: A fox that attacked a woman, her 2-year-old son and their dog on July 6th at the family’s home on Spinnaker Drive in Hope Mills has tested positive for rabies. The family was playing with the dog when the fox attacked first biting the mother, and then attacking the dog. – See video and complete article at http://www.wncn.com/story/25965704/toddler-attacked-by-rabid-fox-in-hope-mills?clienttype=generic&mobilecgbypass

COLORADIAN and his DOG contract PLAGUE likely after exposure to infected PRAIRIE DOG ~ Another ALASKAN jogger attacked by GRIZZLY ~ HANTAVIRUS infects two TEXANS and kills an OKLAHOMAN ~ CAT in CALIFORNIA infected with TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from LOUISIANA ~ Unusual RABIES report from NEW YORK.

Prairie Dog. Photo by Jeff Kubina. Wikimedia Commons.

Prairie Dog. Photo by Jeff Kubina. Wikimedia Commons.

Colorado 07/09/14 CO Dept of Public Health & Environment: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a resident and his dog have tested positive for plague. “The patient and the dog may have been exposed in eastern Adams County. Plague is spread from fleas on rodents, most commonly prairie dogs. People walking in open spaces and trails should avoid contact with rodents.” – For symptoms, precautions and complete media release see https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news-release-pneumonic-plague-found-colorado-resident-and-pet-dog

Grizzly:

img_home_sow_n_cubsAlaska 07/07/14 Bird Valley: For the third time in two months a grizzly has attacked a person in Alaska. The latest incident involves a 59-year-old woman who was jogging near her home in the Bird Valley village of Indian south of Anchorage when two nearly grown cubs emerged from brush along the roadside, then she was hit from behind by their mother. Fortunately, all three of the bears then left the area and she was able to call for help on her cell phone. The woman had been wearing in-ear headphones and was not carrying bear spray. The trail, part of a system of trails in Chugach State Park, will be closed for a week in keeping with state policy. The valley borders Bird and Penguin creeks, which will soon be filled with salmon, a major attraction to hungry bears.- For complete article see http://www.adn.com/article/20140707/woman-suffers-serious-injuries-bear-mauling-near-anchorage

Hantavirus:

hantavirus5667546Texas 07/08/14 myhighplains.com: Two recent cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome have been confirmed in residents of the Panhandle and South Plains. – See http://www.myhighplains.com/story/d/story/-/jsmVHVDCiESAt_sWBATVRw?PreviewStory=true

Oklahoma 07/08/14 Texas County: Officials have confirmed that a resident of the northwestern part of the state died of hantavirus disease in May. – See http://www.myhighplains.com/story/d/story/-/ck9VtQjsnkOpGFBYTP78hw?PreviewStory=true

Tularemia:

80ab05b3670e2bdcb7165060f8167dfd (2)California 07/08/14 North County: Officials have confirmed that a domestic cat housed in the county has been diagnosed with tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, a potentially dangerous bacterial disease that humans can contract. The cat spent a lot of time outside hunting and likely contracted the disease from an infected rodent. All of those who have been in contact with the cat, and of course the cat itself, are all being treated with antibiotics. – See http://www.10news.com/news/county-health-officials-issue-alert-after-cat-contracts-tularemia-also-known-as-rabbit-fever

West Nile Virus (WNV):

LA-DHHLouisiana 07/08/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Three cases of WNV were recently confirmed in Livingston Parish and were all asymptomatic, meaning these individuals did not know they were infected, and only found out while donating blood or having blood work. About 90 percent of all cases are asymptomatic, while about 10 percent will develop West Nile fever. Only a very small number of infected individuals will show the serious symptoms associated with the neuroinvasive disease. Residents who are 65 years old and older are at higher risk for complications, but everyone is at risk for infection. – See http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3062

Rabies:

5704860-portrait-of-gray-fox-barkingNew York 07/07/14 Onondaga County: A gray fox that attacked and repeatedly bit a pregnant woman outside her home at 112 Dutton Avenue in Nedrow has tested positive for rabies. The woman had just returned home from a doctor’s appointment with her 3-year-old son and found the fox chasing her cat in circles in her yard. Then it turned on her. At one point she fell and the fox sunk its teeth deeply into her arm but she managed to tear herself loose and rush her son to safety inside the house. The fox, which continued to hurl itself against the screen door trying to get in, was finally shot by a deputy when it turned and attacked an ambulance that had been summoned. The woman had been bitten at least seven times and required stitches as well as post-exposure rabies shots administered immediately as a precaution. The CDC says studies have indicated no increased risk of fetal abnormalities associated with rabies vaccination during pregnancy. – For photos and complete article see http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2014/07/pregnant_nedrow_woman_fends_off_rabid_fox_after_animal_attacks_and_repeatedly_bi.html

 

Vets in FLOOD AREAS warn DOG owners about LEPTOSPIROSIS ~ Two new LYME DISEASE species found in FLORIDA and GEORGIA ~ COYOTE attacks MAN and DOG in COLORADO ~ RABIES reports from VIRGINIA & CANADA: ONTARIO.

Texas flood zone.

Texas flood zone.

National 05/15/14 rfdtv.com: With all the recent storms and flooding, veterinarians are warning of a disease that spreads through water to both dogs and people. “The most important thing about leptospirosis is it’s a zoonotic disease so dogs can transmit the disease to people,” explained Dr. Ken Harkin, a veterinarian with Kansas State University. Harkin is an expert on leptospirosis. He says the bacterial disease can result in kidney failure and can be deadly to dogs. Symptoms of the disease, for both humans and dogs, include joint pain, weakness, vomiting and possibly jaundice.

image_702798The disease is spread through the urine of wild and domestic animals, and dogs and their owners can be exposed from the same source. “A great example, a few years ago we had a client who brought her dog in here with leptospirosis because their front yard had flooded and the raccoons had contaminated their front yard. Both the husband and the dog ended up in the hospital, obviously different hospitals. He has leptospirosis. The dog had leptospirosis. They both got it from the front yard from the raccoons, but certainly the dog could be a potential source for leptospirosis,” said Harkin. There is a vaccine available. Harkin advises to get your dog vaccinated if you live in an area where this disease is prevalent. – See http://www.rfdtv.com/story/24589387/about-us

Lyme Disease:

Dr. Kerry Clark

Dr. Kerry Clark

National 05/14/14 news-medical.net: Dr. Kerry Clark, associate professor of public health at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, and his colleagues have found additional cases of Lyme disease in patients from several states in the southeastern U.S. These cases include two additional Lyme disease Borrelia species recently identified in patients in Florida and Georgia. Overall, 42 percent of 215 patients from southern states tested positive for some Lyme Borrelia species. More than 90 cases of Lyme infection were confirmed among patients from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia. Of these southern cases, 69 percent were found to have infection with B. burgdorferi, 22 percent with B. americana and 3 percent with B. andersonii. “For years, medical practitioners and the public have been told that Lyme disease is rare to nonexistent in the southern United States. Our earlier research demonstrated that Lyme disease bacteria were present in animals and ticks in our region,” said Clark. “The more recent evidence shows that the disease is also present in human patients in the South, and suggests that it’s common among patients presenting with signs and symptoms consistent with the clinical presentation of Lyme disease recognized in the northeastern part of the country.” His new paper, “Geographical and Genospecies Distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNA Detected in Humans in the USA,” was published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology in February. Dr. Brian Leydet in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at Louisiana State University and Dr. Clifford Threlkeld of Ameripath Central Florida collaborated with Clark in his latest research.

lyme-disease-in-children1The findings are significant for several reasons. They provide additional evidence that multiple Lyme Borrelia species are associated with human disease in the U.S., similar to the situation in Europe. The new findings expand the geographic area where Lyme disease should be considered by medical providers and citizens alike, and suggest that human cases of Lyme disease in the southern U.S. may be much more common than previously recognized. Prior to Clark’s previously published paper in 2013, only one or two Lyme bacterial species, Borrelia burgdorferi and B. bissettii, were recognized to cause disease in North America. Current testing methods and interpretation criteria, designed to detect just one species (B. burgdorferi), may explain many of the complaints involving the unreliability of Lyme disease tests in the U.S. Most of the patients included in Clark’s study were suffering from a variety of chronic health problems, such as fatigue, headaches, muscle and joint pain and cognitive dysfunction. As a result, Clark’s research may help millions of chronically ill people living in areas where Lyme disease wasn’t previously recognized. Called “The New Great Imitator,” Lyme disease is often mistaken for illnesses such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), Parkinson’s, ADHD and even Alzheimer’s. – For complete article see http://www.news-medical.net/news/20140514/UNF-Professor-discovers-2-Lyme-disease-bacterial-species-that-infect-human-patients.aspx

Coyote:

nm_Coyote_090722_mainColorado 05/16/14 9news.com: by Robert Garrison, KUSA – A coyote attacked a man and his dog walking on the CU-Boulder campus Thursday evening. University of Boulder police said it happened in a wooded area, southwest of Foothills Parkway and Arapahoe Avenue. The man reported that after focusing on them for some time, the coyote approached and eventually attacked his dog. The dog was on a leash and the man was able to pull the dog away from the attack. The coyote then lunged at the man, biting his left forearm as he reached out to block the coyote’s advance. The man was able to fend off the attack by kicking the coyote and swinging a stick as it retreated. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.9news.com/story/news/local/2014/05/16/coyote-attacks-man-dog-on-cu-campus/9190271/

Rabies:

help-mdVirginia 05/15/14 James City County: A cat that bit someone and a dog that scratched another person on Wednesday in two county neighborhoods are wanted by the Peninsula Health District for observation to ensure they aren’t rabid. A Siamese cat with blue eyes bit a person on Wednesday in the Black Heath area of Ford’s Colony, according to a press release. The cat has been seen in the area wearing a collar, but it was not wearing one at the time of the incident. The same day a black dog with a “pug-like” face weighing about 40 pounds scratched a person in the 3900 block of Powhatan Parkway in Powhatan Secondary, according to a separate release. The releases indicate, once found, both animals will be confined within their homes for a period of ten days. If they are not found, the victims will have to undergo post-exposure treatment for rabies prevention. Anyone who has seen an animal fitting either description is asked to call the Peninsula Health District – Williamsburg Environmental Health at 757-603-4277. After hours contact animal control at 757-253-1800.- See http://www.vagazette.com/news/va-vg-two-animals-sought-for-rabies-observation-20140515,0,1810898.story

Canada:

help-298x300Ontario 05/15/14 Grey Bruce Health Unit: by Janice MacKay – (Officials hope) to find the owner of a dog that bit a youth in Owen Sound. A young male was walking the large brown boxer type dog behind the Owen Sound Family YMCA on Tuesday at about 2:20pm, when it bit another youth. Health unit staff hope to confirm the dog is not infectious with rabies, so the victim can avoid post exposure rabies treatment. Anyone with information is asked to call 519-376-9420. – See http://blackburnnews.com/midwestern-ontario/midwestern-ontario-news/2014/05/15/owen-sound-boy-hopes-to-avoid-rabies-treatments/

World traveler hospitalized in MINNESOTA with LASSA FEVER ~ UTAH confirms case of HANTAVIRUS ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: OREGON’s celebrity WOLF OR-7 may soon exit stage ~ RABIES reports from AZ, AR, CT, FL, GA, MD, NJ, NCx2, PA, SCx2 & VA.

Rat. Bing free use license.

Rat. Bing free use license.

Minnesota 04/04/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A man is in stable condition in a Minnesota hospital with Lassa fever after returning from a trip to West Africa, where an outbreak of Ebola virus is now raging. The Minnesota Department of Health said the man flew to Minneapolis-St. Paul on March 31 and soon after his arrival visited a physician. Because of his travel history and symptoms, the doctor suspected a possible hemorrhagic fever. The man was admitted to the hospital with fever and confusion and CDC testing confirmed a diagnosis of Lassa fever on April 3, the department and the CDC said in separate statements. “This imported case is a reminder that we are all connected by international travel,” CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said in a statement. “A disease anywhere can appear anywhere else in the world withinhours.”

Air routes connecting to and from Africa.

Air routes connecting to and from Africa.

Lassa fever is rarely seen in the U.S., with only seven cases recorded, the latest in 2010, according to the CDC. The agency reported that preliminary information suggests the man flew from West Africa to New York City and on to Minneapolis on another flight. The agency did not say where in West Africa the trip started. The CDC is working with public health officials and airlines to identify anyone who might have had close contact with the infected person, although Lassa fever is not easily spread from human to human. “Casual contact is not a risk factor for getting Lassa fever,” said Barbara Knust, DVM, a CDC epidemiologist in the lab that tested the patient’s blood for Lassa virus. “People will not get this infection just because they were on the same airplane or in the same airport,” she said in a statement.

RatthumbnailCANGBSFFThe Lassa virus is carried by rodents and transmitted to humans through contact with urine or droppings, but in some cases people can catch it from another person through direct contact with blood or bodily fluids, the mucous membranes, or sexual contact. “Given what we know about how Lassa virus is spread to people, the risk to other travelers and members of the public is extremely low,” Martin Cetron, MD, of the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, said in a statement. Between 100,000 and 300,000 cases of Lassa fever occur in West Africa each year, with up to 5,000 deaths. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/45120?isalert=1&uun=g632000d1042R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-04-04

Author’s Note: For more information on Lassa Fever see http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/lassa/

Hantavirus:

imagesCAULAVUQUtah 04/04/14 kcsg.com: The Southwest Utah Public Health Department (SWUPHD) has confirmed a case of hantavirus infection in Kane County. Hantavirus incidences are rare in the five-county region, with the last case being reported four years ago in Iron County. The virus is found in the droppings, urine, and saliva of rodents, usually deer-mice. “This time of year, a lot of people start spring cleaning in places where rodent droppings are found; such as sheds, barns, and cabins,” says Dr. David Blodgett, SWUPHD Health Officer. “If hantavirus is present, it can be inhaled and cause respiratory illness within a few weeks.” Hantavirus infection, called Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, starts with flu-like symptoms followed by difficulty breathing and can be life-threatening. Treatment includes intensive hospital care to deal with the respiratory distress. Hantavirus is not known to spread person-to-person. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.kcsg.com/view/full_story/24877415/article-Hantavirus-Infection-in-Southwest-Utah?instance=more_local_news1

Follow-Up Report:

Wolf OR-7:

(See previous posts dated 11/12/11, through 12/13/13)

graywolfNPRphotoOregon 03/29/14 missoulian.com: The wandering wolf dubbed OR-7 has enjoyed well over his 15 minutes of fame. But even with continued public interest, he could soon fade from the spotlight. The Global Positioning System collar that has sent regular electronic pulses to reveal his travels for the past three years has eclipsed its normal life span, and state and federal biologists don’t plan to replace it. “When that collar dies, we’ll never know his fate,” Rob Klavins of the conservation group Oregon Wild told the Mail Tribune newspaper. “But that could be OK. It’s good to have a little mystery in the world.“ The wolf gained celebrity status in 2011 after leaving a pack in northeastern Oregon, days after the state issued a kill order for his father and a sibling for preying on livestock.

wolfMost Oregon wolves on such journeys, called dispersals, have stayed in northeast Oregon or traveled to Idaho. The young wolf headed west with the tracking satellite following his moves as he fruitlessly searched for a mate. He became the first confirmed wolf in western Oregon since the last one was killed under a livestock-protection bounty program in 1937. He then crossed a state line and became California’s only confirmed wolf since 1924. He wandered throughout Northern California and almost traveled into Nevada before retracing his steps to southern Oregon, where he’s spending his time near Mount McLoughlin. The wolf will not be re-collared because biologists prefer to collar breeding pairs or members of packs. Collaring can be dangerous and time-consuming, and biologists would rather collar animals in other packs not sporting GPS collars to get information on their whereabouts and habits instead of an established bachelor like OR-7. – See this article at http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/oregon-wandering-wolf-s-signal-ready-to-fade/article_15a8644a-b6ac-11e3-aef0-001a4bcf887a.html. See 3/22/14 companion article about a group retracing the path of wandering Oregon wolf OR-7 at http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/group-retracing-trek-of-wandering-oregon-wolf-or/article_bad003c8-b121-11e3-bc24-001a4bcf887a.html

Rabies:

a898778rabies-alertArizona 04/04/14 Santa Cruz County: Officials have announced that the entire county is under quarantine after an outbreak of rabies reached record-breaking levels. The quarantine order, effective through December 31st, was issued after 23 positive cases of rabies were reported since January 1st of this year. The county recorded only 12 cases in all of 2013. – See http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/county-now-under-rabies-quarantine/article_1a9ef380-bc0e-11e3-a7b0-0019bb2963f4.html

323rabies-skunk_mediumArkansas 04/01/14 Pulaski County: A skunk that was observed behaving strangely near the 800 block of Buttercup in North Little Rock‘s Levy neighborhood has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/d/story/rabies-warning-in-north-little-rock/59358/GB4-wF9jxECoaYCA8PI3Gw

Connecticut 04/02/14 Hartford County: A raccoon that fought with two vaccinated dogs on Rogers Lane in Enfield on March 26th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.journalinquirer.com/towns/enfield/raccoon-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-enfield/article_84f6f590-ba68-11e3-acb9-001a4bcf887a.html

17858296_BG1Florida 03/29/14 Hernando County: A raccoon that fought with a vaccinated dog on Sun Hill Lane in Brooksville has tested positive for rabies. – See http://tbo.com/health/rabid-raccoon-reported-in-east-brooksville-20140329/

Georgia 04/02/14 Hall County: A raccoon that fought with a dog on Bowen Bridge Road in the Clermont area is the fourth wild animal in the county to test positive for rabies so far this year. – See http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=273283

17907533_240X180Maryland 03/31/14 Prince George’s County: A fox removed from the 4000 block of Woodrow Lane in Bowie on March 21st has tested positive for rabies. – See http://laurel.patch.com/groups/politics-and-elections/p/fox-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-bowie

raccoonrabid113524New Jersey 04/01/14 Atlantic County: A raccoon removed from the backyard of a resident in the 4000 block of Ridge Avenue in Egg Harbor Township is the third animal to test positive for rabies in the township so far this year. – See http://www.shorenewstoday.com/snt/news/index.php/egg-harbor-twp/eht-general-news/50867-third-case-of-rabies-found-in-egg-harbor-township.html

rabiesAlert521d4-1North Carolina 04/04/14 Cleveland County: Eighteen people are being treated for potential exposure to rabies after a Good Samaritan in the town of Lawndale adopted one of two puppies that were abandoned and were wandering along Elam Road. The adopted puppy began acting sickly and when brought to a clinic was diagnosed with and tested positive for the virus. Making matters worse, the other puppy ran away. Officials are warning area residents who might have been in contact with either of the puppies to seek immediate medical attention. – See http://www.wsmv.com/story/25158263/stray-puppies-leave-cleveland-co-neighbors-owing-thousands-of-dollars-in-medical-bills

320x240North Carolina 03/28/14 Cumberland County: A bat found between Pamalee Drive and Murhison Road in Fayetteville has tested positive for rabies. This is the 3rd case of the virus to be confirmed in the county this year. – See http://www.fayobserver.com/news/local/article_1026ca27-0ce1-51f8-9ed6-2af733ba68ac.html

Rabid-Fox---26690055Pennsylvania 04/02/14 Montgomery County: A fox that was killed by a resident’s unvaccinated dog on the 2000 block of Weber Road in Worcester Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.timesherald.com/general-news/20140402/montgomery-county-health-department-confirms-fox-positive-for-rabies-in-worcester

Cat-RabiesSouth Carolina 04/01/14 Laurens County: A stray cat found in or near the town of Gray Court has tested positive for rabies. At least one person has been advised to seek treatment for possible exposure to the virus. – See http://www.independentmail.com/news/2014/apr/01/cat-exposes-person-rabies-laurens-county/

South Carolina 03/29/14 Aiken County: A man in his 20s has been advised to seek post-expsosure treatment for rabies after a raccoon entered his home on Limerick Drive in Aiken and scratched his face. The raccoon has since tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.aikenstandard.com/article/20140329/AIK0101/140329342/1004/man-recommended-to-undergo-treatment-after-rabies-exposure

crittersVirginia 04/04/14 Prince William Health District: A cat found on March 31st near Forest Glen Road in Woodbridge between Horner Road and Hylton Avenue has tested positive for rabies. And in Nokesville, four raccoons and a skunk have tested positive for the virus since July of 2013. A Rabies Alert has been issued for both communities. – See http://www.insidenova.com/health/health-district-warns-residents-about-rabies-in-woodbridge-nokesville/article_a439195c-bc3d-11e3-947e-0019bb2963f4.html