Tag Archives: Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Rare outbreak of TULAREMIA baffles health officials ~ Two sheep hunters medevaced after GRIZZLY attack in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ Angler attacked by GRIZZLY in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ Moose hunter medevaced after GRIZZLY attack in NORTHWEST TERRITORIES ~ NEW MEXICAN jogger attacked by BLACK BEAR ~ Elk hunter attacked by BLACK BEAR in NEW MEXICO ~ CALIFORNIA, ILLINOIS & NORTH CAROLINA confirm WEST NILE VIRUS related fatalities ~ NEW YORK resident dies of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS ~ UTAHN dies of PLAGUE ~ EBOLA VIRUS remains in semen longer than thought ~ RABID FERAL CAT reports from NC & PA.

Cat with rabbit. Photo by Eddy Van 3000. Wikimedia Commons.

Cat with rabbit. Photo by Eddy Van 3000. Wikimedia Commons.


National 09/10/15 businessinsider.com: by Laura Zuckerman – U.S. health officials said on Thursday they were puzzled by a surge in the number of people who have contracted a rare bacterial disease usually found in rabbits that has already killed a Wyoming man and sickened dozens of people in Colorado, South Dakota and Nebraska this year. The unusually high number of cases of tularemia, sometimes called rabbit fever, have been concentrated in northeastern Wyoming and in neighboring parts of South Dakota and Nebraska and farther south in the Colorado Front Range, where there have been reported die-offs of animals like rabbits and voles that can carry the infectious disease, Wyoming health officials said. While tularemia, whose symptoms can include fever, sore throat and muscle aches, is often present in the environment, it rarely sickens more than a few people a year in Wyoming, a handful in Colorado and just a few in South Dakota, health officials said. That compares to 41 confirmed human cases so far this year in Colorado, 14 in Wyoming – the highest number in the quarter century that reliable records have been compiled – and at least 19 in South Dakota, the most since 34 people acquired the ailment in 1984, state epidemiologists said. “This is quite unusual,” South Dakota epidemiologist Lon Kightlinger said.

zoonosis_tularemia (2)The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is studying cases in those states and Nebraska to identify common factors, Wyoming State epidemiologist Tracy Murphy said. The disease is treatable with antibiotics but can be deadly. It killed an elderly Wyoming man earlier this year after causing a severe infection of his central nervous system, Murphy said. Tularemia can be transmitted to people through handling of sick animals, including pets like cats and dogs that have come in contact with infected rabbits or rodents, as well as bites from ticks, deer flies or horse flies. Infections also are linked to activities such as lawn mowing, in which people inhale bacteria from contaminated dust, or handling animal carcasses, health officials said. – For complete article see http://www.businessinsider.com/rabbit-fever-outbreak-baffles-us-health-officials-2015-9



20091222142651GrizzlyNPSBritish Columbia 09/07/15 globalnews.ca: by Paula Baker – Two men are recovering in hospital after being attacked by a grizzly bear sow south of Fort Nelson, B.C. on Sunday. According to B.C. Conservation, the two men were legally hunting sheep when they walked over a ridge and were attacked by a grizzly bear sow. The sow was with her two cubs in an area northeast of Buckinghorse River. The hunters, who are both in their 30s and from the Peace River area, were carrying a sheep cape and meat. The men had been part of a larger party but were in a remote area about 40 kilometres west of Alaska Highway, which is accessible only by foot, helicopter or horse, said Mark West with B.C. Conservation. West says the sow was reacting “defensively” and this was not a predatory attack. In an attempt to stop the grizzly, one hunter told conservation officers he may have gotten off two shots but was unsure if he hit the bear. – For complete article and video see http://globalnews.ca/news/2206899/two-men-injured-after-bear-attack-south-of-fort-nelson/

grizzly_alaska_frBritish Columbia 09/11/15 dailytownsman.com: by Arne Petryshen – A grizzly bear attacked an angler near Canal Flats (a village at the south end of Columbia Lake) on Wednesday night. The attack occurred just off Findlay Creek Road, about eight kilometres up. Conservation Officer Joe Caravetta said the man was walking along a path and  startled a young grizzly bear at a distance of about three meters. “The bear attacked the angler, biting him on his leg and hand. The bear fled shortly and the angler made his way back to the vehicle, returned to Canal Flats and contacted 911,” Caravetta said. The man was then taken to the Invermere hospital, with non-life threatening injuries. “Conservation Officer Services and the RCMP attended at the site where the attack occurred and closed the area off and advised others in there to the incident and to leave the area,” he said. Caravetta said they determined there was no immediate threat to the public at that site at that time. Four officers attended the site Thursday morning to further investigate. “They determined that there was a large, domestic cow carcass, buried where the attack occurred,” he said. “The carcass was fairly old and consisted of mostly bones and hide. The bear was also seen by the officers and confirmed to be about a three year old grizzly — so a fairly small grizzly bear and fairly young.” Caravetta said it was at that point that a decision was made not to pursue the bear. – See http://www.dailytownsman.com/breaking_news/326678781.html

GrizzlyUSFWSNorthwest Territories 09/11/15 cbc.ca: A hunter has been medevaced to Yellowknife with serious injuries after he was attacked by a grizzly bear in the Mackenzie Mountains near Norman Wells, N.W.T. The attack happened around 11 a.m. Thursday morning. According to the RCMP, the hunter and a guide were spotting moose when the bear attacked them. The hunter and the guide didn’t see the grizzly until it made its attack. RCMP say the bear pulled the hunter down an embankment and he received “multiple injuries during the attack.” The guide fired a shot which scared the bear off and stopped the attack. The injured hunter was rescued by a helicopter, treated in Norman Wells, and then medevaced to Yellowknife for more treatment. The bear is unaccounted for at this time. – See http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/grizzly-bear-attacks-hunter-near-norman-wells-n-w-t-1.3224822

Black-Bear-Cub-and-Mom-BingFreeUseLicenseNew Mexico 09/10/15 kob.com: by Elizabeth Reed – Game and Fish officers are searching for an adult black bear that attacked a runner on a hiking trail near Los Alamos Wednesday night. The attack occurred on the Cañon de Valle trail around 7 p.m. Officers said the man was running on the trail when he encountered a female bear and her cub.  The man tried to scare the bear away by making a noise, but it charged, knocking him into a stream. The department says the bear started biting and clawing at his head.  After the bear left, the man was able to walk 2.5 miles back to his car and flag down a passing motorist, who took him to Los Alamos Medical Center. He suffered deep flesh wounds and scratches to his head, according to Game and Fish. – See http://www.kob.com/article/stories/s3902741.shtml#.VfJAG_lVhBc

BlackBearNPSNew Mexico 09/12/15 santafenewmexican.com: by Staci Matlock – State Game and Fish Department officers are searching for a black bear that attacked a 60-year-old man from Missouri who was elk hunting west of Wagon Mound, the second bear attack on a person in two days in Northern New Mexico, officials said Friday. The hunter received bite injuries to his foot through his boot as he climbed a tree to try to escape the bear. He was taken to Alta Vista Hospital in Las Vegas, N.M., where he was treated and released. The attack, which occurred Thursday near the tiny village of Ocate, marked the seventh time a black bear has attacked a human in the state this year, the highest number in the past 16 years, according to Lance Cherry, a spokesman for the Game and Fish Department. It was the fourth attack this year resulting in an injury. None of the attacks was fatal. – For complete article see http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/local_news/in-second-attack-this-week-bear-scares-hunter-up-tree/article_57453d6d-4422-5a3c-ac26-ecb9efede549.html


California 09/10/15 pe.com: by Brian Rokos – A 77-year-old Riverside County man who died last month tested positive for the West Nile virus, the county Department of Public Health announced Thursday, Sept. 10. The man was the first person in Riverside County with the mosquito-borne virus to die since 2008, according to a news release from the department. – See http://www.pe.com/articles/county-779876-virus-riverside.html

wnv1_clip_image002Illinois 09/08/15 stltoday.com: A St. Clair County resident has become the third WNV-related fatality in the state so far this year. – For article see http://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/health/first-death-from-west-nile-virus-reported-in-st-clair/article_ad99eb95-b23b-5450-9cc0-59b7547b95c7.html

North Carolina 09/08/15 wral.com: State authorities on Tuesday reported the first death of 2015 from a confirmed case of WNV. The state Department of Health and Human services did not release the name, age, gender, or location of the person who died, citing confidentiality laws. However, Charles Hogan identified the patient as his father, Roscoe Hogan. Hogan said that his father died at Duke Regional Hospital on Aug. 27. The previous day, doctors told him that his father’s lab results revealed West Nile virus. Roscoe Hogan was 76 at the time of his death and had been a resident of Durham. – For complete article see http://www.wral.com/state-reports-first-2015-death-from-west-nile-virus/14884377/


eee-threat-249x187New York 09/08/15 syracuse,com: by James T. Mulder –  An elderly Salina man diagnosed with Eastern equine encephalitis has died, according to the Onondaga County Health Department. It is the sixth reported Eastern equine encephalitis death in Central New York since 1971. The Salina man was the first person in the state and the second in the nation diagnosed this year with the potentially deadly mosquito-borne virus, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. – For article see http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2015/09/salina_man_dies_of_eastern_equine_encephalitis.html


yersiniaUtah 09/10/15 moabtimes.com: by Molly Marcello – An elderly San Juan County man died after contracting plague last month, according to the Utah Department of Health. While officials do not know exactly how the man contracted the disease, they speculate he was infected by fleas carried by rodents or cats. “The individual lived on a rural property so we’re pretty certain that it likely came from a flea bite from rodents on the property such as prairie dogs, or potentially, cats,” said San Juan County Public Health Director Worthy Glover. “[The man] had a lot of cats in [his] barn to deal with the rodents — those cats could potentially have had fleas.” – For complete article see http://www.moabtimes.com/view/full_story/26850987/article-Elderly-man-in-San-Juan-County-dies-after-contracting-plague?instance=home_news_right


ebola.stopGlobal 09/09/15 reuters.com: by Tom Miles – Isolated flare-ups of Ebola may point to a higher risk of transmission via the semen of male survivors than previously thought, undermining hopes of ending West Africa’s deadly outbreak by the end of the year. The World Health Organization’s advice is that all male survivors should be tested three months after the onset of symptoms and then monthly until they know they have no risk of passing on the virus through their semen, Bruce Aylward, head of the WHO’s Ebola response, told a news conference. But a forthcoming study in the New England Journal of Medicine, based on around 200 survivors, found that around half still had traces of the virus in their semen after six months, a clinician familiar with the study told Reuters. “The old advice of three months is no longer good,” the clinician said. “The number of people with persistent virus in their semen is much greater than expected.” The clinician, who was not authorized to speak about the study, added that the risk might not only be from sex but also from masturbation. “It’s not the sex that is dangerous, it’s the semen that is dangerous,” said Aylward, who mentioned the study during a news conference but did not give details. “How people actually get exposed, in soiled linens or whatever, is not clear.”

WHO.33454Transmission through semen may explain why a few cases continue to occur even though the outbreak has been almost completely eradicated by an intense international effort, recently bolstered by the deployment of a trial vaccine in Guinea and Sierra Leone. “This virus and this outbreak in particular has a nasty sting in the tail,” Aylward said. “It’s not finished, by a long shot.” The latest flare-up, in a village on the northern border of Sierra Leone, followed the death of a 67-year-old woman late last month, 50 days after the previous confirmed case in the region. Transmission chains are considered to have been broken after 42 days with no new infections. However, Aylward said that sexual transmission was “obviously not a huge risk, because if it were we would have seen a lot more in the areas that were hardest hit at the beginning of this outbreak.” – See http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/09/us-health-ebola-semen-idUSKCN0R922G20150909?feedType=RSS&feedName=healthNews


North Carolina 09/08/15 abc11.com: A brown tabby feral cat that attacked and bit a man’s leg in the 500 block of East Cabarrus Street in Raleigh last week has tested positive for rabies. – See http://abc11.com/pets/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-raleigh/974862/

13620Pennsylvania 09/10/15 mytwintiers.com: A feral cat that jumped out from under a car and bit the owner on her leg and arm, and the woman’s daughter on the arm, has tested positive for rabies. The incident occurred on Dietz Road,. Wilmot Township, Bradford County. – See http://www.mytwintiers.com/news/local-news/feral-cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-bradford-county

Invasive MOSQUITO threatens southern CALIFORNIA with exotic viruses ~ CALIFORNIA county issues HANTAVIRUS ALERT ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE reports third HUMAN CASE of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and second EEE fatality ~ GEORGIAN scratched by RABID STRAY CAT.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

California 10/16/14 capitalpress.com: Officials have confirmed that the black-and-white striped Aedes aegypti or yellow fever mosquito was found last week in Commerce and Pico Rivera east of Los Angeles. Last year the species was found in other parts of the state including the Central Coast and Central Valley. The mosquito is aggressive, is active during daylight hours, and is capable of transmitting the yellow, dengue and chikungunya fever viruses, though none of these diseases have been reported in Los Angeles County. – See http://www.capitalpress.com/California/20141016/yellow-fever-mosquito-reaches-southern-california


Deer mouse

Deer mouse

California 10/17/14 San Diego County News Center: Media Release – A North American deer mouse trapped in routine monitoring in a rural part of Fallbrook has tested positive for hantavirus, and County officials are reminding people to be careful if they ever have to clean up mice or rodent nests. The mouse was the seventh rodent caught this year in the county to test positive for hantavirus, a disease that can be fatal. People have very little chance of being exposed to hantavirus, despite the fact that it is common in San Diego County, as long as wild rodents stay in the wild and don’t get inside homes, garages, sheds and cabins. However, people can be exposed if they sweep or vacuum places where infected rodents have nested. That’s because hantavirus can be inhaled if people disturb areas where dust from infected rodents, dried saliva, urine or feces can be “kicked up” into the air. “The best way to protect yourself is to avoid exposure,” said County Department of Environmental Health Director Elizabeth Pozzebon. “But if you have to clean an area where rodents have been don’t sweep or vacuum. Use wet-cleaning methods.” – For complete article and precautions see http://www.countynewscenter.com/news/deer-mouse-fallbrook-tests-positive-hantavirus


eee-threat-249x187New Hampshire 10/15/14 NH Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials confirm the third human case of EEE in an adult resident of Manchester in Hillsborough County. The individual died in mid-September and is the second EEE-related fatality in the state so far this year. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2014/10-oct/10152014eeecase.htm


KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAGeorgia 10/17/14 Madison County: A stray cat that scratched the owner of property located in the 80 block of Gatewood Drive in Colbert on Oct. 4th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/7241-Colbert-woman-scratched-by-rabid-cat.html

CANADA: HUNTER mauled by GRIZZLY and shot by friend in BRITISH COLUMBIA ~ TEXAS HEALTHCARE WORKER infected with EBOLA ~ Current EBOLA outbreak believed due to consumption of BAT meat ~ CDC predicts CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS will spread in U.S. ~ MAINE reports first ever HUMAN case of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and heavy increase in ANAPLASMOSIS cases ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CA, IL & SD ~ RABIES reports from AL & NJ.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

Photo courtesy National Park Service.

British Columbia 10/12/14 globalnews.ca: by Negar Mojtahedi – A 56-year-old man has been transported by air ambulance to Calgary’s Foothills hospital after he was mauled by a grizzly bear and shot by his friend while hunting near Fernie, British Columbia. Early Sunday morning, conservation officers and emergency crews responded to reports of grizzly bear attack in the Elk Valley. “This is a somewhat remote area and there’s no history with this bear,” said Sgt. Cam Schley, a conservation officer from Cranbrook. The victim’s hunting partner shot and killed the 400 pound male grizzly bear. In the process, he accidentally shot his friend. His injuries are the result of being mauled by the animal and from gunfire. The victim’s hunting partner was not injured by the grizzly bear.

sebcmapDavid Karn, a spokesman for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment, says the victim was in stable condition when he left the area. He is currently at Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary and is now believed to be in critical condition. The two men were not hunting grizzly bears. – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1611225/grizzly-bear-attack-in-fernie/


EBOLA-texas-us-flag-monitorTexas 10/12/14 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – A female healthcare worker who was involved in the care of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan has tested positive for the virus. The unidentified worker, who was among those monitoring themselves for possible symptoms, developed a fever Friday night and told medical staff at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Less than 90 minutes later, the worker was in an isolation unit at the hospital, having driven to the facility, according to Daniel Varga, MD, the chief clinical officer at Texas Health Resources. A close contact of the worker is also “proactively” in isolation, Varga told reporters at a media briefing in Dallas. In a subsequent briefing, CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, said investigators believed the worker had only the one contact during the period when she may have been infectious. Varga said the patient and her contact are being cared for in a 24-bed intensive care unit that had been cleared for use by possible Ebola patients. He said he could not discuss the other aspects of the care of the patient. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins the county’s chief executive, said blood tests at the state reference laboratory in Austin, using polymerase chain reaction methods, showed the worker has Ebola. A second test, at the CDC, has not yet confirmed the finding, he said, but “unfortunately, we’re confident it will be.” Frieden said results of the confirmatory test were expected later on Sunday. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/Ebola/48054?isalert=1&uun=g632000d2324R5753012u&utm_source=breaking-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking-news&xid=NL_breakingnews_2014-10-12

Straw colored fruit  bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Straw colored fruit bat. Photo by Diana Ranslam.

Global 10/09/14 ibtimes.co.uk: by Hannah Osborne – People in Ghana eat bats because it is a readily available source of protein as well as being a luxury food, researchers have found. Experts at the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London were looking to find out why ‘bushmeat’ is so popular in the West African country despite the risks involved. Like many infections, Ebola is likely to have arisen from human interaction with wild animals. The current outbreak, which has killed almost 4,000 people, is believed to have come from hunting and eating bats. Researchers surveyed almost 600 people across Ghana to find out why the practice is so prevalent, despite the risks involved. Hunting and eating bats can lead to infection of ‘zoonotic’ pathogens, with the creatures in particular known for hosting more viruses than any other mammal. Transmission occurs from bites, scratches, bodily fluids, tissue and excrement.

Cambridge LogoFrom surveying hunters, vendors and bat meat consumZoological_Society_of_London_(logo)ad been bitten and scratched. None reported using protective equipment, such as gloves. Four of those interviewed said people fight over bats, sometimes lying over the animal while it was still alive to stop others from taking it – often resulting in injury. Bats were prepared and cooked in a variety of ways, with the most common being to smoke them and putting them in soup. Researchers said it appears bat bushmeat is both a source of sustenance and luxury food, as many hunters said they would keep their catches for themselves. Consumers reported high taste ratings and relatively high prices, suggesting it is a sought-after product. – For complete article see http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak-why-do-people-eat-bat-meat-1469295


aaCDC-LogoWestern Hemisphere 10/07/14 cdc.gov: Media Release – Since the chikv outbreak began in December 2013, nearly 750,000 cases have been reported in the Caribbean and Central, South and North America. In the United States, 1,200 travelers have imported the virus to the United States, and 11 locally transmitted cases have been reported in Florida as of September 30. The mosquitoes that can transmit chikv are common in many parts of the Americas, including the United States. CDC anticipates that the virus will continue to spread to new areas in the Americas. In the United States, CDC experts believe chikv will behave like dengue virus. Imported dengue cases have led to small, sporadic local transmission in the continental United States but have not led to widespread outbreaks. – See http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p1006-chikungunya-in-americas.html


EEE54fgh84Maine 10/10/14 pressherald.com: A York County resident over 60 has been identified as the state’s first human case of EEE since Maine began testing for the virus in 1964. The individual fell sick in late July and was hospitalized in August, first in Maine and later in Massachusetts, but has since returned home to recuperate.- For complete article see http://www.pressherald.com/2014/10/10/first-maine-resident-tests-positive-for-eee/


tickPreview2Maine 10/11/14 outbreaktoday.com: According to state health officials there have been 133 cases of anaplasmosis reported in the first nine months of 2014 compared to 94 cases reported during the same time period last year. That’s an increase of 39 cases, or more than 40% with three months remaining in the year. Nationally, the number of anaplasmosis cases reported to the CDC has increased from 348 cases in 2000, to 1,761 cases in 2010. The disease is tick-borne and people get the infection when bitten by an infected deer tick, the same one involved in the transmission of Lyme disease. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/maine-reports-dozens-more-anaplasmosis-cases-compared-to-2013-2013/


logo_CDPH_v.1_colorCalifornia 10/08/14 CA Dept of Health: Media Release – There were 60 new WNV human cases reported in California this week from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Glenn (1), Kern (2), Kings (1), Los Angeles (18), Orange (15), Riverside (4), San Bernardino (2), San Joaquin (2), Santa Clara (1), Stanislaus (3), Sutter (2), Tehama (1), Tulare (1), and Yolo (5). 16 WNV-related fatalities have been reported in to CDPH from in nine local health jurisdictions: Glenn (1), Long Beach City (1), Los Angeles (2), Orange (4), Sacramento (2), Shasta (1), Stanislaus (2), Sutter (2), and Tehama (1). 488 human cases from 29 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2014. – See http://westnile.ca.gov/

3495411871-1Illinois 10/07/14 DuPage County Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed that a female resident of Hanover Park in her 40s is the first fatality in the county due to WNV. State officials report two previous deaths due to WNV this year. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/WNVdeath2014

SDdhSouth Dakota 09/30/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 49 human cases of WNV statewide in 25 counties. – See Page 3at https://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Sept2014.pdf


Alabama 10/07/14 Covington County: A coyote found about three miles 1_62_coyote_snarlsouth of Andalusia in the Carolina community has tested positive for rabies.

New Jersey 10/07/14 dailyrecord.com: by Peggy Wright – A 69-year-old bow hunter from Cliffside Park used a knife and arrow to kill a rabid coyote that jumped him Sunday at the Black River Wildlife Management Area and a day earlier bit a bicyclist on Patriot’s Path, authorities said Tuesday. . . . The Cliffside Park man, whose name was withheld, was at the rear of the Archery Range at the management area on North Road when bitten around 12:55 p.m. on Sunday. State Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said the 34-pound male coyote “jumped” the man. Cris Cooke-Gibbs, the health officer for Chester and Washington townships, said the hunter was bitten on the face. – See http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/news/local/2014/10/07/cops-rabid-coyote-bit-two-chester-township/16847079/

CALIFORNIA WOMAN survives BLACK BEAR attack ~ Follow-Up Report: NEW HAMPSHIRE WOMAN looses battle with EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) ~ EEE report from NY ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CAx2, FL, KS, LA, MA, MS & NM ~ RABIES report from VA.

Black bear. Bing free use license.

Black bear. Bing free use license.

California 09/25/14 keyt.com: by John Palminteri – A Carpinteria Valley rancher was injured when she took on a 300-pound Black Bear Monday in what is called an “unprovoked” attack in an avocado grove. Emily Miles was on a walk around noon in Rincon Canyon near her home, when her two dogs bolted out of the trees followed by the bear. In moments the animal was on its hind legs and swinging at the woman who was trying to defend herself. Long red scratches on her back shows where  the bear claws shredded Miles’ shirt and tore her skin. Miles tried to get away, turning and running a short distance. That is when the bear chased her down, and took a bite into her upper left thigh. She hit the ground hard, breaking a rib and still vigorously turned over to kick towards the bear while screaming. “He took me down. He grabbed me. He sunk his teeth into my thigh and knocked me down,” said Miles. Blood was coming out of four puncture wounds from the bite, during the harrowing ordeal. “Looking at him, I knew he could kill me in an instant. He was probably 300 pounds and six feet tall standing,” said Miles. The bear reared back again, and Miles said the two stared eye to eye, before the animal came down on all fours, and slowly moved back into the trees.   After a few steps, the bear stopped and “walked away and kept looking back at me,” she said. – For video and complete article see http://www.keyt.com/news/breaking-woman-injured-in-bear-attack-on-a-carpinteria-valley-avocado-ranch/28232774


Follow-Up Report:

(See EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) report from NH posted 13 Sept 2014)

Eastern-Equine-EcephalitisNew Hampshire 09/24/14 conwaydailysun.com: by Tom Eastman – The Conway woman who was diagnosed with the EEE virus lost her battle with the disease Sept. 18 at the Gosnell Hospice House with her family by her side. Diane Catherine Humphreys, 51, of Haynesville Avenue in Conway, was diagnosed with the illness in August. The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services confirmed the diagnosis on Aug. 22. She was the first person in the state to be diagnosed with the mosquito-borne disease in five years. A second adult was diagnosed in early September in Hopkinton. That patient was recently discharged from the hospital, according to state epidemiologist Dr. Benjamin Chan, who spoke with The Conway Daily Sun Wednesday. – See http://www.conwaydailysun.com/newsx/local-news/116675-humphreys-51-of-conway-succumbs-to-eee

New York 09/24/14 citycentral.com: A second known human case of EEE in Onondaga County has been confirmed in a patient that is currently hospitalized. The first case was reported in August. – See http://www.cnycentral.com/news/story.aspx?id=1100809#.VCZFjRaOra4


disease%20cycleCalifornia 09/29/14 CA WNV: Officials have confirmed 375 human cases of WNV including 15 fatalities so far this year. – For individual county reports see http://westnile.ca.gov/

California 09/25/14 mercedsunstar.com: Merced County officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV. Both individuals were hospitalized but are recovering. – See http://www.mercedsunstar.com/2014/09/25/3868212_first-human-cases-of-west-nile.html?rh=1

Florida 09/23/14 FL Dept of Health Polk County: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the county’s first human case of WNV so far this year. The victim, a female resident of Lake Wales, is recovering. This is the seventh confirmed case in the state this year. – See http://www.mypolkhealth.net/pressreleases/

Kansas 09/26/14 kwch.com: Seven new cases of WNV have been reported statewide, according to the latest numbers from the Kansas Health Department. New cases have been reported in Barton, Comanche, Haskell and Pawnee counties. Four of the new cases are in Barton County, which now has two confirmed cases of the more serious neuro-invasive form of the disease. In total, 16 cases of WNV have been reported in Kansas so far this year. – See http://www.kwch.com/news/local-news/seven-new-cases-of-west-nile-confirmed-in-kansas/28275526

Louisiana 09/26/14 LA Dept of Health & Hospitals: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 15 new cases of WNV, of which five were neuro-invasive disease infections, bringing this year’s total to 118 reported infections. This week’s new infections include five neuro-invasive disease cases in Ascension (1), Bossier (1), East Baton Rouge Parish (1), Ouachita (1) and Pointe Coupee (1) parishes. There were nine new cases of West Nile fever; these cases were in Caddo (3), East Baton Rouge (5) and La Fourche (1) parishes, and one new asymptomatic case in East Baton Rouge (1) parish. There were no new deaths reported this week. – See http://www.dhh.state.la.us/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3123

Massachusetts 09/23/14 MA Health & Human Services: Media Release – A female resident of Middlesex County in her 20s is the third human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The victim is recovering. – See http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/newsroom/press-releases/dph/third-human-case-of-west-nile-virus-in-mass-announced.html

Mississippi 09/29/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed three new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 40 cases including five deaths so far in 2014. The new cases were reported in Lowndes, Neshoba, and Rankin counties. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15640,341.html

New Mexico 09/23/14 therepublic.com: An 89-year-old Lea County man hospitalized for encephalitis has died of WNV. This is the state’s first WNV-related death this year, but eight human cases of WNV have been confirmed in the state so far this year. – See http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/e51b0f9fb38241f4b8cffb862e6e33a3/NM–West-Nile-Death-New-Mexico


cat-child66789Virginia 09/26/14 Grayson County: Two local residents are being treated following exposure to a feral cat that tested positive for rabies. An alert has been issued because there are other cats in this stray population. – See http://www.wvva.com/story/26636022/2014/09/26/rabid-cat-prompts-local-health-district-to-issue-rabies-alert

CANADIAN mauled to death by GRIZZLY sow ~ CALIFORNIA child attacked by MOUNTAIN LION ~ COLORADAN hospitalized with SEPTICEMIC PLAGUE ~ ILLINOIS reports increase in LYME DISEASE ~ OREGON’s celebrity WOLF OR-7’s mate also a wanderer ~ Travel Warning: CDC warns of CHIKUNGUNYA outbreak in AMERICAN SAMOA ~ EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) report from NH ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from NY, ND & SD.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Alberta 09/08/14 globalnews.ca: by The Canadian Press – Mounties say a hunter who had been missing in southern Alberta’s Kananaskis Country was found dead Monday after a fatal bear attack. RCMP would not confirm the identity of the hunter but it’s thought to be Rick Cross, a 54-year-old Calgary business man who was reported missing by his family after he did not return from a sheep hunting trip near PickleJar Lakes on the weekend.RCMP said a ground and air search was begun for the hunter on Sunday.

zCM-SouthwestAlberta“Evidence was located suggesting that the hunter had been injured at a location approximately four kilometres east from the PickleJar day use area parking lot on Highway 40,” RCMP said in a news release. “Search teams also encountered a female grizzly bear and cub in the immediate area.” The search resumed Monday morning, when teams found the man’s remains in the same area. “The hunter had suffered obvious trauma consistent with a bear attack and is believed to have died from those injuries,” said the release. “The hunter was alone at the time of the incident.” – For video and complete article see http://globalnews.ca/news/1552033/bear-kills-missing-hunter-in-kananaskis-country/

Mountain Lion:

cougar2498California 09/10/14 torontosun.com: Game wardens and hounds combed steep, wooded canyons and ravines for a third day near California’s Silicon Valley on Tuesday, searching for a mountain lion that injured a 6-year-old boy, but the cat has so far evaded trackers, wildlife officials said. The boy was hiking a trail with family and friends on Sunday in a densely wooded preserve adjacent to a winery, just west of the town of Cupertino, when the mountain lion pounced on him and tried to drag the child away, his parents told officials. The boy’s father and another man in the group rushed the cat shouting at the animal, and the cougar retreated into the woods. The boy was left with bite wounds and scratches to his upper body, head and neck, and was hospitalized following the attack. Kirsten Macintyre, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the boy has since been released and was home with his family, who officials have not publicly identified. A team of sheriff’s deputies, game wardens and a tracker with dogs immediately mounted a search for the lion, which resumed after daybreak on Monday and was extended into Tuesday with the addition of a second tracking crew, Macintyre said. She said motion-sensitive cameras also were being been set up in the vicinity, along with several live cage traps. On Tuesday, DNA from cougar saliva samples taken from the victim’s clothing showed the mountain lion was a male. From witness accounts and the size of paw prints left behind, the cat is believed to be a young adult, about three-quarters full grown, or roughly 90 pounds in weight, Macintyre said. If the animal is captured and its DNA matches the saliva samples, the lion will be killed in the interest of public safety, officials said. – For complete article see http://www.torontosun.com/2014/09/10/california-officials-hunt-for-cougar-that-attacked-boy

Author’s Note: California Dept of Fish & Wildlife officials said on Sept 10th that they have captured and killed the mountain lion believed to be responsible for the attack. – See http://abc7news.com/news/authorities-capture-mountain-lion-that-attacked-boy-in-cupertino/303485/


types-plagueColorado 09/05/14 San Juan Basin Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed a human case of septicemic plague in a La Plata County resident. An investigation is underway to determine the source of exposure. The patient is currently receiving treatment. Bubonic plague is the most common form of plague; septicemic plague is seen less often. Symptoms typically include fever, chills, extreme weakness, abdominal pain, shock, and possibly bleeding into the skin and other organs. You can get septicemic plague from handling an infected animal or from bites of infected fleas. This is the second case of plague in La Plata County this year. Since 1957, Colorado has identified 65 cases of human plague, nine (14%) of which were fatal. – See http://sjbhd.org/public-health-news/

Lyme Disease:

ribbonIllinois 09/08/14 peoriapublicradio.org: by Hannah Meisel – Reported cases of Lyme disease are on the rise in Illinois. Instances of the illness have gone up about 250 percent in the last ten years. Melaney Arnold, with the Illinois Department of Public Health, says Lyme disease’s carrier — the deer tick — has a carrier of its own. “Very much like the name mentions, they typically ride on deer. So as deer migrate south, we do see some of that southern migration of the ticks.” – See http://peoriapublicradio.org/post/cases-lyme-disease-illinois

Wolf OR-7:

Remote camera photo of a wolf using the same area as the wolf known as OR-7. This is the first evidence that OR-7 has found another wolf in the Oregon Cascades. Photo courtesy of USFWS.

Remote camera photo of a wolf using the same area as the wolf known as OR-7. This is the first evidence that OR-7 has found another wolf in the Oregon Cascades. Photo courtesy of USFWS.

Oregon 09/05/14 oregonlive.com: by Lynne Terry – Oregon’s erstwhile wandering wolf OR-7 truly met one of his own when he mated with a small black female earlier this year: She, too, is a traveler and perhaps even from northeast Oregon as well. DNA tests on her scat indicate she came from northeast Oregon or even Idaho. She shares bloodlines with the Minam and Snake River packs, which include wolves from both those areas, said John Stephenson, wolf coordinator for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. That means she traveled several hundred miles or more to the western Cascades where she mated with OR-7 earlier this year. “It’s fascinating that after dispersing such a great distance to an area where there are so few wolves that they were able to find one another,” Stephenson said.

Oregon's erstwhile wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that were born in April. Photos by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Oregon’s erstwhile wandering wolf, OR-7, has at least three pups that were born in April. Photos by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

OR-7 was born into the Imnaha Pack in northeast Oregon, then traveled several thousand miles to California and back to Oregon looking for territory and a mate. The two produced offspring in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in April. Biologists gathered scat from the area in May and July and sent the samples to the University of Idaho for DNA testing. They also collected images of OR-7’s mate and three pups, all snapped by stationary, motion-detecting cameras in the wilderness. The results do not pin down the birthplace of the small, black female but indicate her heritage. – For photos and complete article see http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2014/09/oregon_wolf_or-7_pups_are_his.html

Travel Warning:

300px-Flag_of_American_Samoa.svgAmerican Samoa 09/09/14 Outbreaknewstoday.com: Post by Robert Herriman – Since the chikungunya outbreak was first geography-of-american-samoa0recognized in American Samoa in late July, the case count has grown to more than 700 cases. This is the first report of locally transmitted chikungunya in Samoa. – For complete post see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/cdc-travel-notice-issued-for-american-samoa-chikungunya-outbreak-now-over-700-cases-64070/

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE):

EEE54fgh84New Hampshire 09/10/14 NH Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the second human case of EEE this season in an adult from Hopkinton. The first human case of EEE in New Hampshire this season was confirmed on August 22nd in Conway, NH. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2014/09-sept/09102014eeecase.htm

West Nile Virus (WNV):

NY-HealthDept-LargeNew York 09/08/14 NYC Health Dept: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the season’s first human cases of illness with WNV in five New York City residents, all over the age of 50. Two patients reside in Brooklyn, and one each from Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan. Three of the patients were hospitalized and diagnosed with meningitis; all have been discharged. The other two cases did not require hospitalization. – For complete release see http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pr2014/pr031-14.shtml

Logo677854North Dakota 09/09/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – WNV Surveillance Coordinator Alicia Lepp has announced the state’s first WNV-related death in 2014. The individual was a woman who was hospitalized and was older than 60 years of age. Today’s report brings the total number of cases in North Dakota this season to12. – For complete release see http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-09-09-First%202014%20WNV%20Human%20Death-v%20FINAL.pdf

index5587155South Dakota 09/09/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 31 human cases of WNV in 18 counties so far this year. – See http://doh.sd.gov/documents/statistics/ID/Aug2014.pdf


Black bear sow with cub. Bing free use license.

Black bear sow with cub. Bing free use license.

WEST VIRGINIA 08/21/14 GEORGE WASHINGTON NATIONAL FOREST: An Indiana man visiting family in Virginia was attacked by a black bear sow with two cubs while hiking in George Washington National Forest in West Virginia with his dog on August . Man and dog were both seriously injured and hospitalized but early reports indicate 21st they will survive. According to the victim, the dog saved his life by attacking the bear while he kept striking it with a rock. – See http://www.nvdaily.com/news/2014/08/bear-CEattack-wounds-man-and-his-dog.php


hi_4333.chikungunyaFLORIDA 08/20/14 FL Dept of Health: Two more cases of locally acquired chikungunya fever were reported this week in Palm Beach County. In 2014, a total of six cases of locally acquired chikungunya fever have been reported. In addition, 21 new cases of chikungunya fever were reported this week in persons that had traveled internationally. In 2014, 171 travel-associated cases have been reported. – See http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/mosquito-borne-diseases/_docume nts/2014/week33arbovirusreport-8-16-14-b.pdf

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE):

eee-threat-249x187NEW HAMPSHIRE 08/22/14 NH Dept of Health and Human Services: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first human case of EEE in the state this year has been diagnosed in a Conway resident. – See http://www.dhhs.state.nh.us/media/pr/2014/08-aug/08222014-eee.htm



imagesCACMXFDXCALIFORNIA 08/24/14 City of Long Beach Health Dept: Officials confirmed three human cases of WNV so far this month. – See http://www.longbeach.gov/health/wnv_info/activity.asp

ILLINOIS 08/18/14 IL Dept of Public Health: Media ReleaseChicago health officials have confirmed that the state’s first human case of WNV has been diagnosed in a woman in her 70s. – See http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/press14/8.18.14_First_Human_WNV_Positive_2014.htm

KANSAS 08/20/14 KS Dept of Health: Media Release – The first human case of WNV in the state has been reported in Republic County. – See http://www.kdheks.gov/news/web_archives/2014/08192014a.htm

LOUISIANA 08/22/14 LA Department of Health and Hospitals: This week, DHH confirmed 10 new cases of WNV, of which seven were neuroinvasive disease cases, bringing this year’s total to 52 reported infections. This week’s new infections include neuroinvasive disease cases in Ascension (1), East Baton Rouge (5) and Ouachita (1) parishes. There were three new asymptomatic cases in the state from Caddo (2) and Pointe Coupee (1) parishes.– See http://new.dhh.louisiana.gov/index.cfm/newsroom/detail/3096

MASSACHUSETTS 08/22/14 Middlesex County: The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) today announced the first human case of WNV in the state this year. The patient, a county resident in his 60s, remains hospitalized, but is recovering. – See http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/newsroom/press-releases/dph/first-human-case-of-west-nile-virus.html

MINNESOTA 08/22/14 Pope County: The state’s first human case of WNV this year has been confirmed by the state health department. A Pope County woman became ill Aug. 2nd but did not require hospitalization. See http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/story/26347889/minnesota-confirms-first-west-nile-case-of-year

OHIO 08/20/14 OH Dept of Health: Media Release – The state’s first two human cases of WNV this year have been identified in a 24-year-old woman in Muskingum County and a 78-year-old woman in Cuyahoga County. Both women were hospitalized with the virus. – See http://www.odh.ohio.gov/~/media/ODH/ASSETS/Files/news/West%20Nile%20Human%20Case%202014.ashx

SOUTH DAKOTA 08/19/14 SD Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed 7 new cases of WNV reported bringing the seasonal cumulative total to 22. Cases are residents of the following counties: Beadle, Brown(4), Codington(3), Edmunds, Grant, Hamlin, Hand, Hughes(3), Hutchinson, Lincoln, Marshall, Meade(2) and Minnehaha(2). – See http://doh.sd.gov/documents/diseases/WNVupdate8-19.pdf

WISCONSIN 08/20/14 WI Dept of Health Services: Media Release – The first human case of WNV in the state has been reported in Ashland County. – See http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/News/PressReleases/2014/082014.htm


8942410_448x252NEW JERSEY 08/23/14 Camden County: A stray kitten removed from a feral cat colony in Berlin Borough on July 18th and handled by two Stratford women has tested positive for rabies. – See https://www.google.com/search?q=GLOUCESTER+twp++nj&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&channel=sb

NEW JERSEY 08/19/14 Burlington County: A feral kitten found in a yard off Briarcliff Road in the Heritage Village of Evesham has tested positive for rabies. Officials say other feral cats in the area may be infected. – See http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/rabid-kitten-located-in-heritage-village-section-of-evesham/article_7c2a48f2-e5ff-588e-a4f1-d2442b769bdf.html

NEW YORK 08/22/14 Brooklyn Borough: A Rabies Alert went out this week warning that feral cats and kittens roaming Bensonhurst may have the virus after city officials captured a rabid raccoon that was seen fighting with some street cats in the neighborhood on Aug. 20. – See http://www.brooklyndaily.com/stories/2014/35/all-raccoons-vs-cats-2014-08-29-bk_2014_35.html

OREGON 08/24/14 Mills County: A cat killed on Horton Street in the City of Goldthwaite last week tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.goldthwaiteeagle.com/86368/1318/rabies-confirmed-in-goldthwaite

SOUTH CAROLINA 08/21/14 Anderson County: A total of 14 people in the county have been referred to their health care providers for rabies consultation in association with a case involving a kitten that tested positive for the virus, the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control reported today. – See http://www.scdhec.gov/Agency/NewsReleases/2014/nr20148121-01/

Will the CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS become a threat in the U.S.? Scientist says “it’s only a matter of time”. ~ TULAREMIA killing RABBITS in COLORADO ~ FLORIDA reports five HORSES down with EEE ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from CO, SD & TX ~ RABIES reports from CO & NY.

Aedes aegypti biting human. Courtesy U.S. Dept of Agriculture.

Aedes aegypti biting human. Courtesy U.S. Dept of Agriculture.

Global 07/01/14 nationalgeographic.com: by Karen Weintraub – Chikungunya (pronounced chick-un-GOON-ya) has plagued other parts of the world—particularly Asia and Africa—for decades, becoming more prevalent in recent years. But it arrived in the Caribbean only in December and has already infected as many as 250,000 people there. The virus is generally not lethal and can’t pass from person to person. But the pain it brings can be horrible—some who have weathered its wrath have said they wished the virus had killed them. In rare cases, the agony can last for months or even years. Public health officials in the Caribbean are struggling to contain the outbreak, in part because of the difficulty of limiting mosquito breeding grounds and because the disease is so new to the area. Paola Lichtenberger, director of the Tropical Medicine Program at the University of Miami, says she is sure the epidemic is more widespread than official numbers suggest simply because making the diagnosis is so difficult. Public health officials in the U.S. and around the world, meanwhile, are tracking cases carefully and encouraging people in affected areas to take precautions to avoid infections and to clean up areas of standing water. Airports in ten major American East Coast cities with Caribbean-bound flights have posted warnings to passengers about chikungunya.

81343_990x742-cb1404168438So far, 73 American travelers have brought the disease home from abroad and another 15 have been infected by mosquitoes in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, though it hasn’t yet reached mosquitoes in the continental United States. But it’s only a matter of time before that happens, according to Lichtenberger, who has helped treat three chikungunya patients since the outbreak began. – For complete article see http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140701-chikungunya-caribbean-mosquitoes-world-health/?rptregcta=reg_free_np&rptregcampaign=20140623_t1_rw_membership_r1p_us_dr_w


colojackColorado 07/04/14 Larimer County: Officials confirmed on July 3rd that a rabbit found in Fort Collins has tested positive for tularemia, aka Rabbit Fever, a bacterial infection that is potentially life-threatening to humans. A die-off of rabbits has been reported in the area over the past few weeks. – For complete article including risks, symptoms and precautions see http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/2014/07/03/tularemia-found-southeast-fort-collins-area-rabbit/12205939/

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE):

eee-threat-249x187Florida 07/03/14 wcjb.com: A fifth horse has tested positive for EEE in North Central Florida. Three of the infected horses were reported stabled in Marion County, and two in Alachua County. – See http://www.wcjb.com/local-news/2014/07/fifth-case-eastern-equine-encephalitis-north-central-florida

West Nile Virus (WNV):

1184134480-mosquito2Colorado 07/03/14 CO Dept of Public Health & Environment: Officials have confirmed the state’s first two human cases of WNV so far this year reported in Saguache and Pueblo counties. – See https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/news-release-human-cases-west-nile-virus-identified-colorado

South Dakota 07/03/14 SD Dept of Health: Officials have confirmed two new human cases of WNV in Codington and Lincoln counties. – See http://doh.sd.gov/diseases/infectious/wnv/documents/WestNileupdates2014.pdf

Texas 07/03/14 TX Dept of State Health: Officials have confirmed the state’s first human case of WNV this year was reported in Travis County. – See https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/20140703.aspx


rabiesAlert521d4-1Colorado 07/02/14 Yuma County: Officials have confirmed that a feral cat found near the Morgan Community College campus in Wray has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.yumapioneer.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6060&Itemid=39

New York 07/02/14 Tompkins County: A bat captured earlier this week in Montgomery Park in the town of Dryden has tested positive for rabies. It is known, and was reported, that three children using sticks poked at the bat on Monday, but no one knows who the children are. Officials need to determine as soon as possible if any or all of these children were exposed to the virus. The health department urges anyone who had contact or knows of anyone who had contact with a bat in Montgomery Park in Dryden to immediately contact them at 607-274-6688. – See http://ithacavoice.com/2014/07/officials-scramble-find-kids-poked-rabid-bat-dryden-park/