Tag Archives: Heartland Virus

CANADIAN biker survives GRIZZLY attack when bear punctures can of pepper spray ~ OKLAHOMA’s first case of HEARTLAND VIRUS proves fatal ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE has highest incidence of LYME DISEASE ~ COLORADO confirms third case of HANTAVIRUS this year ~ OKLAHOMA confirms first case of HANTAVIRUS this year proves fatal ~ RABIES report from OHIO.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Canada:

Alberta 05/25/14 660news.com: A well-prepared mountain biker is recovering with minor injuries after a grizzly bear attack in Alberta. It happened Saturday night around 9:00 p.m. just outside the town of Jasper. Parks Canada Spokesperson Kim Weir said the cyclist was riding on a trail when he was charged by the bear and knocked off his bike. Fortunately when the biker was face down, there was a can of bear spray on his backpack. “So the bear actually pepper-spray-bearbit into the bear spray, punctured the can, the bear spray was deployed, the bear got it into his mouth and his eyes and so on and left the area,” she said. “The mountain biker had a cell phone so he then called for help.” Weir reminds all trail users in the mountains be make noise, to let wildlife know they are nearby. She added at this time of year, it’s also a good idea to avoid the trails during dawn and dusk as it’s a highly active period for wildlife hunting. – See http://www.660news.com/2014/05/25/grizzly-punctures-bear-spray-can-during-attack-on-biker-and-flees/

Heartland virus:

Lone Star Tick

Lone Star Tick

Oklahoma 05/27/14 newsok.com: The Oklahoma Department of Health has confirmed the state’s first case and death of Heartland virus. The Health Department says a Delaware County resident recently died from complications of the virus. Heartland virus was first identified in Missouri in 2009. The virus is found in the Lone Star tick and is likely spread through tick bites. The Oklahoma case is only the tenth person confirmed with the virus and the second person to die from it. Other cases have occurred in Missouri and Tennessee. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, loss of appetite, nausea, bruising easily and diarrhea. All of the patients diagnosed with Heartland virus reported spending several hours per day in outside activities or occupations. There is no vaccine or drug to prevent or treat the disease. – See http://newsok.com/oklahoma-heartland-virus-death-confirmed/article/4851400 and http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/heartland/index.html

Lyme Disease:

lyme-awareness5128New Hampshire 05/25/14 fosters.com: According to Alan Eaton, an entomologist with the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, New Hampshire has the highest incidence of Lyme disease in the country. Eaton said this is in part due to high tick populations, but also because so many people live close to or in wooded areas where ticks flourish. Eaton also said the highest incidence of Lyme Disease within the state is found in the Seacoast region. – See http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140525/GJNEWS_01/140529521/-1/FOSNEWS

Hantavirus:

imagesCA4WCXZVColorado 05/23/14 Costilla County: The third human case of hantavirus in the state this year was reported in Costilla County. Earlier this month a fatal case was reported in Rio Grande County. Two to six cases are reported in the state each year. – See http://www.koaa.com/news/hantavirus-reported-in-costilla-county/

Deer mouse. CDC.

Deer mouse. CDC.

Oklahoma 05/22/14 Texas County: by Kyle Fredrickson – A Panhandle man has died as a result of a virus commonly carried by wild rodents, according to the state Health Department. The man, who is only identified as being age 65 or older, was a Texas County resident. The state Health Department said he died of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, which has no cure, said Becky Coffman, an epidemiologist with the department. Hantavirus is carried by wild rodents, especially deer mice, found in Oklahoma and southwest portions of the U.S. It’s transmitted to humans by touch or inhalation of virus particles shed by its host through fecal matter, urine and saliva. Data show it is most often contracted when people in rural areas are maintaining buildings with high rodent activity. – See http://newsok.com/oklahoma-panhandle-resident-dies-as-result-of-virus-carried-by-wild-rodents/article/4846191

Rabies:

Raccoon cub.

Raccoon cub.

Ohio 05/28/14 Westchester County: Someone left five well-fed baby raccoons on the doorstep of the Westchester County, N.Y., Health Department on Friday, and the department said that person should call immediately to be assessed for the possibility of rabies. The month-old raccoons were delivered to the department’s office in Mount Kisco in a cage with bottles of milk, blankets and toys, the department said. “They appear to have been well cared for and nurtured, which means that there was direct contact between these raccoons and the person or people who were caring for them,” said Dr. Sherlita Amler, the county health commissioner. “That’s why it’s important that we talk to the individual or individuals who left them to determine if they may have been potentially exposed to rabies.” Raccoons are among the most-common carriers of rabies, a disease that is fatal if not quickly treated. Department spokeswoman Caren Halbfinger said that the raccoons’ caretaker needs to be asked about any bites or scratches. Officials also want to know whether the raccoons’ mother was sick. – See http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/national_world/2014/05/26/raccoons-0526-art-gj9sdmjt-1.html

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Six new cases of HEARTLAND VIRUS confirmed in MISSOURI and TENNESSEE ~ COYOTE/WOLF hybrid spotted in SOUTH CAROLINA ~ RABIES reports from AZ, FL, MA, NJ, NY, NC, OK, SC & TX.

Lone Star Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Lone Star Tick. Courtesy CDC.

Missouri and Tennessee 03/27/14 cdc.gov: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with health officials in Missouri and Tennessee have identified six new cases of people sick with Heartland virus: five in Missouri and one in Tennessee. The new cases, discovered in 2012 and 2013, are in addition to two discovered in 2009 and are described today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Heartland virus was first reported in two northwestern Missouri farmers who were hospitalized in 2009 with what was thought to be ehrlichiosis, a tick-borne disease. However, the patients failed to improve with treatment and testing failed to confirm ehlrlichiosis. Working with state and local partners, CDC eventually identified the cause of the men’s illness: a previously unknown virus in the phlebovirus family now dubbed Heartland virus.
CDC-LogoOngoing investigations have yielded six more cases of Heartland virus disease, bringing to eight the total number of known cases. All of the case-patients were white men over the age of 50. Their symptoms started in May to September and included fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, headache, nausea, or muscle pain. Four of the six new cases were hospitalized. One patient, who suffered from other health conditions, died. It is not known if Heartland virus was the cause of death or how much it contributed to his death. Five of the six new cases reported tick bites in the days or weeks before they fell ill. Nearly all of the newly reported cases were discovered through a study conducted by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services and CDC are actively searching for human cases at six Missouri hospitals.

 

Range of Lone Star Tick. CDC map.

Range of Lone Star Tick. CDC map.

CDC has been working closely with the Missouri and Tennessee state health departments and other federal agencies to advance understanding of Heartland virus disease by learning more about the patients who were infected, their illness and their exposure to ticks. CDC seeks to determine the symptoms and severity of the disease, where it is found, how people are being infected, and how to prevent infections. CDC studies to date have shown Heartland virus is carried by Lone Star ticks, which are primarily found in the southeastern and eastern United States. Additional studies seek to confirm whether ticks can spread the virus to people and to learn what other insects or animals may be involved in the transmission cycle. CDC is also looking for Heartland virus in other parts of the country to understand how widely it may be distributed. – For complete article including precautions see http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0327-heartland.html
Coyote/Wolf Hybrid:

coywolf-hybridSouth Carolina 03/27/14 greenvilleonline.com: by Charles Sowell – The coyote/wolf hybrid that scares deer hunters throughout South Carolina has been found at the Savannah River Site by U.S. Forestry Service personnel doing a fawn mortality rate study, officials said last week. According to Charles Ruth, with the state Department of Natural Resources, fawn mortality at the SRS was found to be 70 percent, much higher than previously thought, and of that higher rate, 80 percent was found to be caused by coyotes. That number, while higher than expected, was not nearly the surprise that a forest service study of coyote DNA that found one coyote/wolf hybrid — a coyote with Canadian grey wolf DNA, said John Kilgo, a research biologist with the forest service. “It was noticeably bigger than even the largest coyote,” he said. “So we took its DNA and a picture. We were stunned when the results came back with Canadian grey wolf in the animal’s background.”
9661542-wolf.coyote.hybrid“We don’t know how it got here,” Kilgo said. “It may have wandered down from the north, but that is not likely. More likely is that it was imported by fox hunters, or someone else who wants to use the animal for sport and then it escaped.” The hybrid animal comes from female coyotes who bred with male grey wolves in Canada and then crossed the border into the United States, said Ruth. The coyotes are also known to breed with domestic dogs. “We don’t think these animals pose any risk to humans,” said Kilgo. “And we only found one with wolf DNA out of the 500 or so animals tested, so we are treating it as an isolated incident.” – For complete article and photo see http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20140327/ENT/303270050/Coyote-wolf-hybrid-spotted-Savannah-River

Rabies:

800px-Striped_Skunkby_www.birdphotos.comWC-2Arizona 03/28/14 Santa Cruz County: Officials plan to request a quarantine situation next week after the number of animal rabies cases in the county rose to 22 this year. Another seven cases were reported in November and December of 2013. Nearly all have been infected skunks, but one case in Tubac involved a bat. Tubac has had 13 cases since November of last year, four cases were reported in Nogales, four in Sonoita, three each in Rio Rico and Patagonia, and two in Patagonia Lake Estates. – See http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/officials-sound-alarm-over-rabies-outbreak/article_fb4eadb6-b688-11e3-b1e3-001a4bcf887a.html
Racoon15642Florida 03/27/14 Hernando County: A raccoon that fought with a vaccinated dog in the Sun Hill Lane vicinity of Brooksville has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wtsp.com/story/news/local/2014/03/27/brooksville-raccoon-positive-rabies/6969033/
bobcat_ME_IFWMassachusetts 03/26/15 Worcester County: A bobcat that attacked a 35-year-old blind horse in its barn on Grove Street in Upton on March 15th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://uptondaily.com/2014/03/26/rabid-bobcat-attacks-upton-horse/
WashDFWNew Jersey 03/26/14 Morris County: A raccoon that fought with two dogs in the Belrose Court area of Long Valley on March 7th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://newjerseyhills.com/rabid-raccoon-report-in-long-valley-a-warning-to-pet/article_34f6e254-b503-11e3-8790-0019bb2963f4.html
EasternRedFox_VA_WilliamH-Majoros2New York 03/28/14 Herkimer County: A fox that attacked a man at his residence in the Newport area in the past week has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.littlefallstimes.com/article/20140328/NEWS/140329223
RaccoonDEC_NY.govNorth Carolina 03/27/14 Iredell County: A raccoon captured in the vicinity of the 400 block of East Monbo Road in Troutman has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.statesville.com/news/article_ccca6f3e-b624-11e3-a142-001a4bcf6878.html
World+News+10-1Oklahoma 03/27/14 Dewey County: A skunk that tested positive for rabies has prompted officials to issue a Rabies Alert in the county. This is the seventh case of animal rabies reported this year. – See http://www.woodwardnews.net/local/x542465783/Rabid-skunk-identified-in-Dewey-County
raccoon454 - CopySouth Carolina 03/27/14 Horry County: A person is being treated for exposure to rabies after a raccoon tested positive for the virus in the Bakers Chapel community. – See http://www.wbtw.com/story/25091210/rabies-case-investigated-in-horry-county-4th-case-this-year
thumbnailCA0KC8HVTexas 03/28/14 Wichita County: A skunk found in the southeastern part of Wichita Falls has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2014/mar/28/rabies/

 

Two MISSOURI farmers lead scientists to new, possibly TICK-borne, disease called HEARTLAND VIRUS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS deaths in U.S. now at 66 ~ COLORADO MAN likely contracted BUBONIC PLAGUE at San Juan National Forest campground ~ DOG euthanized in MICHIGAN after contracting EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS ~ MOUNTAIN LION reports from CO, NE, & WY ~ COYOTE report from MASSACHUSETTS ~ LA CROSSE ENCEPHALITIS report from NORTH CAROLINA ~ EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS & WEST NILE VIRUS reports from IN, MAx2, NH, NM, SD, & WA ~ RABIES reports from GA, IA, LA, NY, NC, & VAx2.

This photograph depicts a dorsal view of a female “lone star tick”, Amblyomma americanum. Note the characteristic “lone star” marking located centrally on its dorsal surface, at the distal tip of its scutum. Courtesy CDC.

National 08/30/12 discovery.com: Two men in Missouri who became severely ill after sustaining tick bites were found to be infected with a new type of virus, according to a study from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Both men were admitted to hospitals after experiencing high fevers, fatigue, diarrhea and loss of appetite. They were originally thought to be suffering from a bacterial infection, but doubts arose when they didn’t improve after being treated with antibiotics. Further tests revealed their blood contained a new virus, which the researchers dubbed the Heartland virus. It belongs to a group called phleboviruses, which are carried by flies, mosquitoes or ticks, and can cause disease in humans. While the genetic material of Heartland virus appears similar to that of other phleboviruses, the particular proteins it produces are different enough to call it a new species, said study researcher Laura McMullan, a senior scientist at the CDC. Because the Heartland virus causes such general symptoms, it could be “a more common cause of human illness than is currently recognized,” the researchers wrote in the Aug. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. More studies are needed to identify the natural hosts of the virus, learn how many people are infected with it and find risk factors for infection, McMullan said. Because both men experienced tick bites shortly before they became ill — one man, a farmer, reported receiving an average of 20 tick bites a day — the researchers said it’s likely that the Heartland virus is spread by ticks, although more research is needed to confirm this. The new virus’s closest relative is another tick-borne phlebovirus, called SFTS virus, which was identified last year in China, and causes death in 12 percent of cases.

The Missouri men, who were both infected in 2009, recovered after 10 to 12 days in the hospital, although one of the men has reported recurrent headaches and fatigue in the two years since his hospitalization. The researchers suspect a species of tick commonly found in Missouri, called Amblyomma americanum, is one of the hosts of the Heartland virus. For now, taking precautions to prevent tick bites is the best way to avoid the virus, McMullan said. To prevent tick bites, the CDC recommends using repellents that contain 20 percent or more DEET, as well as avoiding wooded areas or areas with high grass.

Culex sp. mosquito. Known carrier of West Nile Virus.

National 08/29/12 reuters.com: by Sharon Begley – A total of 1,590 (human) cases of West Nile Virus, including 66 deaths, were reported through late August this year in the United States, the highest human toll by that point in the calendar since the mosquito-borne disease was first detected in the country in 1999, health officials said on Wednesday. The toll is increasing quickly. “We think the numbers will continue to rise,” said Dr. Lyle Petersen, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases. Through last week, 1,118 cases and 41 deaths had been reported. The updated figures represent a 40 percent increase in the number of cases and a 61 percent spike in the number of deaths, but are short of the all-time record for a full year: 9,862 cases and 264 deaths in 2003. – See http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/29/us-usa-health-westnile-idUSBRE87S0WC20120829

Colorado 08/29/12 durangoherald.com: by Dale Rodebaugh – In the first confirmed (human) case of bubonic plague in the state since 2006, an Archuleta County resident has tested positive for the disease. The last human case in Archuleta County was in 1998. Although the investigation is ongoing, it is believed that the person contracted the plague during a family outing in the Cimarrona Campground northwest of Pagosa Springs, a news release from the San Juan Basin Health Department said. The department declined to give the gender or age of the victim.

Warning signs are being posted in the campground and environs in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the U.S. Forest Service. The plague often spreads through rodent populations. – For complete article see http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20120829/NEWS01/708299897/Plague-case-reported-in-Archuleta-County

Michigan 08/29/12 Paw Paw, Van Buren County: Health officials confirmed on Wednesday that an 8-week-old puppy has contracted Eastern Equine Encephalitis. It may be the first known incident of a dog contracting the mosquito-borne virus in the state. The puppy was euthanized. – See http://www.freep.com/article/20120829/NEWS06/120829065/Authorities-Paw-Paw-puppy-gets-equine-encephalitis

Mountain Lion Sightings:

Colorado 08/29/12 Boulder, Boulder County: Two mountain lions were spotted in city neighborhoods Monday night. The first, seen in a backyard near Folsom and Walnut streets, responded to hazing and ran away. The second, seen near Maapleton Avenue and 26th Street, killed a house cat and allowed rangers to get within a distance of 10 feet. It’s lack of fear of humans prompted the rangers to shoot it. The two lions are thought to be siblings about 2-years-old. – See http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/31393945/detail.html

Nebraska 08/29/12 Scotts Bluff County: A 110 pound mountain lion found dead in the Wildcat Hills is believed to have been struck by a truck or other large vehicle on State Highway 71. This is the second lion reported in the area recently. – See http://www.omaha.com/article/20120829/NEWS/120829671/1707

Wyoming 08/30/12 Pavillion, Fremont County: Wildlife officials have confirmed that a mountain lion jumped from a homeowners pine tree and fled when the man came from the house to turn off a lawn sprinkler. Because the lion fled, officials don’t believe there is any reason for concern. – See http://county10.com/2012/08/30/mountain-lion-reappears-in-pavillion-wednesday-night-g-bears-now-active-in-lower-elevations/

Coyote Attacks:

Massachusetts 08/28/12 Newton, Middlesex County: A small, off-leash dog was attacked and carried off by a coyote on August 10th in the vicinity of William Street in West Newton. Neighbors reported that at least two area cats were also attacked by coyotes recently. A coyote sighting was more recently reported on Vista Avenue. – See http://www.wickedlocal.com/newton/news/x821894346/Coyote-attacks-reoccur-in-West-Newton#axzz24yRn4tKI

La Crosse Encephalitis (LAC):

North Carolina 08/30/12 Macon County: Health officials have confirmed that two children have been diagnosed with LAC. One child is from the Highlands and the other is from Franklin. Both children were hospitalized but have been released and are recovering. – See http://www.maconnews.com/features/health-a-wellness/3510-la-crosse-encephalitis-in-macon-county

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) & West Nile Virus (WNV):

Indiana 08/29/12 Jeffersonville, Clark County: Health officials confirmed that mosquitoes found in a routine sampling tested positive for WNV. – See http://www.wdrb.com/story/19409290/west-nile-virus-discovered-in-mosquitoes-in-southern-indiana

Massachusetts 08/28/12 Fall River, Bristol County: Health officials confirm that mosquitoes collected from the Oak Grove Cemetery have tested positive for EEE. – See http://www.wpri.com/dpp/news/local_news/se_mass/eee-found-in-mosquitoes-in-fall-river

Massachusetts 08/30/12 Newton, Middlesex County: Health officials confirm that a woman in her 50s is the first reported human case of WNV in the city so far this year. – See http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/newton/2012/08/newton_has_its_first_human_cas.html

New Hampshire 08/3012 Sandown, Rockingham County: State health officials have announced that a batch of mosquitoes trapped in Sandown has tested positive for EEE.  – See https://mail.google.com/mail/?hl=en&shva=1#inbox/139780871d4dc70b

New Mexico 08/29/12 Doña Ana County: A second county resident has been diagnosed with WNV, bringing the total in the state to eight human cases this year. – See http://www.lcsun-news.com/las_cruces-news/ci_21429006/west-nile-strikes-2nd-do-241-ana-county

South Dakota 08/28/12 doh.sd.gov: Update – Health officials confirm 98 human cases of WNV, and one related death, have been reported in the state so far this year. In addition, 8 horses, 1 bird, and 62 positive mosquito pools have been identified. – See https://mail.google.com/mail/?hl=en&shva=1#inbox/139735a4e93e7650

Washington 08/30/12 Grandview, Yakima County: The state Agriculture Department has confirmed that a horse with WNV has been euthanized. – See http://www.sacbee.com/2012/08/30/4771496/grandview-horse-with-west-nile.html

Rabies:

Georgia 08/29/12 Murrayville, Hall County: A rabies alert has been issued after a skunk that came in contact with two dogs in the Tony Peck Road area tested positive for rabies. This is the 17th confirmed rabies case in the county this year. – See http://www.cbsatlanta.com/story/19406657/rabies-alerts-in-hall-dekalb-counties

Iowa 08/29/12 Keokuk, Lee County: A case of rabies in a pet cat has prompted area veterinary clinics to host vaccination clinics. – See http://www.wgem.com/story/19407070/hancock-county

Louisiana 08/28/12 South Mansfield, DeSoto Parish: A skunk picked up in the vicinity of Saunders Street has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.ksla.com/story/19399038/skunk-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-desoto-parish

New York 08/29/12 St. Lawrence County: Two raccoons, one found in Potsdam and the other in Gouverneur, have tested positive for rabies. – See http://northcountrynow.com/news/raccoons-potsdam-and-gouverneur-test-positive-rabies-health-officials-warn-public-again-065156

North Carolina 08/29/12 Guilford and Davidson counties: A raccoon found on Church Street in Greensboro, and a fox found in Reeds, have both tested positive for rabies. Three dogs, a cat, and a person were all potentially exposed to the virus. – See http://www.digtriad.com/news/local/article/242881/57/Triad-Counties-Report-More-Rabies-Cases

Virginia 08/28/12 Ware Neck, Gloucester County: A skunk killed by two dogs last week has tested positive for rabies. This is the fourth confirmed case of the virus in the county this year. – See http://www.dailypress.com/news/gloucester-county/dp-nws-gloucester-rabid-skunk-0829-20120828,0,950529.story

Virginia 08/29/12 Virginia Beach: A fox that bit a man several times while he was working in his yard Tuesday, and two hours later attacked another man working in his yard, has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Fox-tested-for-rabies-after-attacking-2-men-in-Va-3824547.php