Tag Archives: Malaria

BLACK BEAR attacks WISCONSIN bird hunter ~ MALARIA infections hit 40-year high in U.S. ~ NEW MEXICO woman dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from MS, & TXx3 ~ RABIES reports from CT, GA, NJ, NY, VT, & VA.

Black bear. Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Black bear. Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Wisconsin 10/30/13 wqow.com: by Jackson Schmidtke – Sometimes when you go hunting you come across animals you’re not looking to hunt. A Barron County grouse hunter’s encounter on Saturday put him and his dog in the hospital. “It was a spot where he would have never seen this bear laying on the ground,” said DNR Conservation Warden Phillip Dorn. Phil Anderson was hunting ruffed grouse at the Loon Lake Wildlife Area when he heard branches cracking. He thought it was a deer but it turned out to be a black bear. “I heard my dog squealing in distress and I kind of figured out what was happening,” Anderson said. Anderson’s dog had encountered a mother bear and her cubs in Barron County.

a.LoonLake.WI“I yelled for the dog and immediately the adult bear came from that direction and charged at me and knocked me on my back,” said Anderson “She batted me a few times and shook me and then she went back to my dog.”  After regaining his feet, Anderson yelled at the bear hoping to scare it. The bear left the dog and charged Anderson again. This time Anderson was prepared and was able to shoot the bear point blank in the face with birdshot, a lightweight ammo that typically would not down a bear. “Birdshot doesn’t really penetrate that well from distances,” said Dorn “but this was very close range. Probably within three feet.” The 275-pound bear died instantly.  Anderson and his dog were able to walk three quarters of a mile to his truck. He then drove home where he and his wife assessed his injuries and drove to Cumberland hospital. From there he was airlifted to Regions Hospital in the Twin Cities to have his wounds cleaned and closed. – For complete article and video see http://www.wqow.com/story/23834852/2013/10/30/hunter-attacked-by-bear-in-barron-county

Malaria:

a.malaria.298ed98National 10/31/13 medpagetoday.com: by Michael Smith – The number of malaria cases in the U.S. hit a 40-year peak in 2011, the CDC reported. The 1,925 cases, including five deaths, represent an increase of 14% from the 1,691 cases in 2010 and the largest number since 1971, when the agency was notified of 3,180 cases. The 2011 toll includes 1,920 cases classified as imported, as well as one laboratory-acquired case, one related to a transfusion, two congenital cases, and one cryptic case, the agency said in a surveillance summary in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Not only were there more cases, but more cases were classified as severe in 2011 than in 2010, 275 versus 183, a difference that was significant at P=0.0018.

a.MalariaMap.9899f8The CDC report suggested that the increased numbers might be a result of growing international travel to malarial regions, combined with inadequate chemoprevention by travelers. “Malaria isn’t something many doctors see frequently in the United States thanks to successful malaria elimination efforts in the 1940s,” according to CDC Director Thomas Frieden, MD. “The increase in malaria cases reminds us that Americans remain vulnerable and must be vigilant against diseases like malaria because our world is so interconnected by travel,” he said in a statement.

Anopheles mosquito. Malaria carrier. CDC

Anopheles mosquito. Malaria carrier. CDC

The U.S. figures also appear to parallel increases in other countries, the agency said, noting that 2011 numbers in the United Kingdom were up 22% from 2008, although down slightly from 2010. The findings are based on data submitted to the National Malaria Surveillance System, the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, and the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. – For complete article see http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/42630

Blogger’s Note: Malaria gets very little attention in this blog because, as the numbers reflect, it is primarily an issue for those who travel to other areas of the world and not one of major concern to those who work, play, hike, camp, hunt and fish in the great American outdoors. This article, however, is extremely interesting. JG

Hantavirus:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

New Mexico 10/31/13 Santa Fe County: Officials have confirmed that a 73-year-old female resident of the county has died of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, a disease transmitted through the urine, droppings, or saliva of rodents, especially deer mice. – See http://www.abqjournal.com/291992/abqnewsseeker/hantavirus-claims-second-new-mexico-death.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

MS_71058_121809421211160_5406251_nMississippi 10/30/13 MS Dept of Health: State officials have confirmed that the third WNV-related fatality this year involved a resident of Forrest County previously reported as a human case of the virus. There have now been 43 human cases reported in the state, including the three fatalities. – For details see http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,14460,341.html

dallas cty TXTexas 10/30/13 Dallas County: Officials have confirmed the 14th human case of WNV in the 75089 ZIP code area (Rowlett) of the county this year. – See http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/health/Dallas-County-Confirms-14th-Case-of-West-Nile-Virus-229943881.html

Ector_County.TXTexas 10/30/13 Ector County: Officials have confirmed two human cases of WNV in Odessa. – See http://www.oaoa.com/people/health/article_f0371c44-4106-11e3-8c42-0019bb30f31a.html

Midland_County.TXTexas 10/29/13 Midland County: Officials have confirmed five human cases of WNV in the City of Midland, and Midland Health & Senior Services is currently investigating two new cases. – See video and article at http://www.permianbasin360.com/news-article/more-west-nile-cases-confirmed/d/news-article/rCdvp8HR9Eyypq7O025x4Q

Rabies:

xchng_rabid_meanieMeanDog45Connecticut 10/30/3 New Haven County: East Shore Health District officials are warning Branford residents to take precautions after a raccoon that attacked two dogs tested positive for rabies. Dogs, cats, and livestock should be vaccinated. – For complete article and other precautions see http://branford.patch.com/groups/around-town/p/health-district-rabid-raccoon-discovered-in-branford

PHIL_2186_loresCDCGeorgia 10/29/13 Madison County: Two wild animals have recently tested positive for rabies: a skunk that was in contact with a dog in the 1000 block of Coley Davis Road in Danielsville, and a raccoon that was in contact with a cat in the 400 block of Forest Lane in Colbert. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/6511-Two-positive-rabies-cases-reported.html

rasf2New Jersey 10/30/13 Camden County: A skunk that was in contact with a dog in Voorhees Township has tested positive for rabies. – See http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2013/10/30/skunk-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-camden-county-2/

Rabies. Cow dying of rabies.  Copyright ITMNew York 10/30/13 Herkimer County: A cow stabled in the town of Stark has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.uticaod.com/latestnews/x1155601678/Rabid-cow-confirmed-in-Herkimer-County

fox-and-raccoon-nibble2 (2)Vermont 10/29/13 Addison County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a raccoon and a fox found in Bristol tested positive for the virus. The raccoon bit a man, and the fox was dying when it was found. – See http://www.addison-eagle.com/news/2013/oct/29/town-bristol-rabies-alert/

raccoon-loomcomVirginia 10/30/13 Pittsylvania County: A Rabies Alert has been issued by Pittsylvania/Danville Health District officials after a raccoon found in the vicinity of Old Mine Road in the Gretna area tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.godanriver.com/news/pittsylvania_county/article_576c0ca8-4170-11e3-a39d-0019bb30f31a.html

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MALARIA a threat to PENGUIN populations in zoos ~ Scientists report DENGUE FEVER being transmitted in HOUSTON ~ EEE& WNV reports from FL, KS, NH, & TXx2 ~ RABIES reports from MD, MI, & VA.

Humboldt penguin. Photo by Dori. Wikimedia Commons.

Humboldt penguin. Photo by Dori. Wikimedia Commons.

Global 10/06/13 nytimes.com: by Donald G. McNeil Jr. – Zoos all around the world love penguins. They’re cute, they don’t require much space, they never eat zookeepers. And children adore watching them, especially at feeding time. But as carefree as they might look, torpedoing through the water or rocketing into the air like a Poseidon missile, zoo penguins are stalked by an unrelenting killer: malaria. “It’s probably the top cause of mortality for penguins exposed outdoors,” said Dr. Allison N. Wack, a veterinarian at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, which is building a new exhibit that will double its flock to a hundred birds. If left untreated, the disease would probably kill at least half the birds it infected, though outbreaks vary widely in intensity.

King penguin. Photo by Mark Dickson. Wikimedia Commons.

King penguin. Photo by Mark Dickson. Wikimedia Commons.

The avian version is not a threat to humans because mosquitoes carrying malaria and the parasites are species-specific; mosquitoes that bite birds or reptiles tend not to bite mammals, said Dr. Paul P. Calle, chief veterinarian for the Wildlife Conservation Society, which runs New York City’s zoos. And avian malaria is caused by strains of the Plasmodium parasite that do not infect humans. But for penguins in captivity, the threat is so great that many zoos dose their birds in summer with pills for malaria, said Dr. Richard Feachem, director of global health at the University of California, San Francisco.

Emperor penguin. Photo by Samuel Blanc. Wikimedia Commons.

 

Emperor penguin. Photo by Samuel Blanc. www.sblanc.com

Last year, six Humboldt penguins in the London Zoo died of malaria. London is also where the first case of penguin malaria was diagnosed almost a century ago; it was found in a King penguin in 1926. Since then, there have been many outbreaks of avian malaria, including at zoos in Baltimore, South Korea, Vienna and Washington, D.C. The last major American one was at the Blank Park Zoo in Des Moines during the hot, wet summer of 1986. From May to September of that year, 38 of the 46 Magellanic penguins the zoo had just imported from Chile succumbed. – For complete article see http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/08/science/earth/zoos-aim-to-ward-off-a-penguin-killer.html?emc=edit_tnt_20131006&tntemail0=y

Dengue Fever:

dengue_alert548Texas 10/09/13 chron.com: by Todd Ackerman – Dengue fever, a virulent tropical disease thought to be eradicated from the United States in the 1950s, has re-emerged in Houston, according to a new study. Baylor College of Medicine scientists are reporting the mosquito-borne virus has recently been transmitted in Houston, the first evidence the disease so prevalent in the developing world has spread to a major U.S. city in large numbers. In the past decade, it has been identified in Hawaii, south Florida and along the Texas-Mexico border. “Dengue virus can cause incredibly severe disease and death,” said Dr. Kristy Murray, a professor of tropical medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and the study’s principal investigator. “This study shows that Houston may be at risk of an outbreak, that people need to be on the lookout.”

baylorMurray’s team investigated the possibility that dengue might be in Houston because the area has the type of mosquitoes known to carry the virus and a dense population full of frequent travelers south of the border, where the virus is endemic. But the study, published Wednesday in the journal Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, found that most of the infections were transmitted in Houston. There is no vaccine or treatment for the virus. A pandemic outside the United States – hot spots are in India and Bangladesh, Indonesia, Brazil and Mexico – dengue infects more than 100 million people a year, killing at least 25,000. Identified in nine tropical countries before 1970, it has spread to more than 100 today. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.chron.com/news/health/article/Dengue-virus-identified-in-Houston-4883103.php

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) & West Nile Virus (WNV):

Jackson_County_FLFlorida 10/09/13 Jackson County: Officials have confirmed that a deer found off Firebird Lane, south of Marianna, has tested positive for EEE. A resident notified authorities after his dog was exposed to a deer that was behaving abnormally. – See http://www.wmbb.com/story/23650822/deer-tests-positive-for-eee-in-jackson-county

KansasDeptHealthKansas 10/09/13 KS Dept of Health: Officials have confirmed 12 additional human cases of WNV in the past week bringing the total number of human cases so far this year to 32, including two fatalities. As of Oct. 7, the case count by county in Kansas is: Sedgwick-7, Barton-6, Johnson-3, Sherman-2, Wyandotte-2, Atchison-1, Butler-1, Chautauqua-1, Decatur-1, Ellis-1, Logan-1, Marshall-1, Republic-1, Rice-1, Rush-1, and Saline-1. – See http://www.kdheks.gov/news/web_archives/2013/10092013.htm

nh-medicaidNew Hampshire 10/09/13 NH Dept of Health: Officials today confirmed that a horse stabled in the Belknap County town of Belmont has tested positive for WNV. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2013/10-oct/10092013horse.htm

tarrant cty TXTexas 10/09/13 Tarrant County: Officials have confirmed a second county resident has died after contracting WNV. The victim was a male from Arlington in his 70s. The other fatality was a male resident of South Fort Worth in his 30s. So far this year five human cases of WNV have been identified in the county, including the two fatalities. – See http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/health/Arlington-Man-Dies-After-Contracting-West-Nile-Virus-227078781.html

dallascountysealTexas 10/08/13 Dallas County Dept of Health: Officials have confirmed the ninth human case of WNV in the county so far this year. The resident lives in ZIP code 75149 and is diagnosed with West Nile Neuro-invasive Disease. See http://www.dallascounty.org/department/hhs/press/documents/PressRelease_NinthPositiveHumanCase10082013.pdf

Rabies:

Bing.free.use.license.d88808sjpgMaryland 10/09/13 Anne Arundel County: A raccoon found Monday at the Fort Smallwood Park gate house has tested positive for rabies. The park is in Pasadena and officials are advising anyone who may have had contact with the raccoon to seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/anne-arundel/pasadena/bs-md-ar-rabid-racoon-20131009,0,1700238.story

Bat%20SketchMichigan 10/08/13 Tuscola County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a bat found in the county tested positive for the virus. – See video and article at http://www.wnem.com/story/23642583/bat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-local-community

1248930287_t4KVf-L-1Virginia 10/08/13 Accomack County: Officials have issued a Rabies Alert after a raccoon found roaming Cropper and Church streets in Chincoteague tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20131008/ESN01/310080073/CHINCOTEAGUE-Officials-concerned-after-third-case-rabies-year-found-island

Was the U.S. blood industry’s supply of raw plasma flowing in from Latin American and Caribbean countries in the 1970s contaminated with Hepatitis C?

BookCoverImage-2

LAMB’S BLOOD is a novel based on a human blood collecting operation in Nicaragua that was exporting its product in huge quantities to U.S. blood industry facilities in the 1970s.

Hepatitis C (HCV) is a contagious liver disease caused by a virus. Those who contract the disease are at risk of developing liver cirrhosis and/or liver cancer. There was no screening test for HCV prior to the 1990s, and it was known the disease was heavily endemic throughout Latin America and the Caribbean region. Nevertheless, the U.S. blood industry was importing raw human blood products from a great many of the Latin American and Caribbean nations in the 1970s and 1980s. Other human blood transmitted diseases include Hepatitis A and B, HIV/AIDS, Chagas, Malaria, West Nile Virus, and others.

LAMB’S BLOOD is now available through Amazon.com, the Kindle Store, and through local independent bookstores.

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PENNSYLVANIA confirms first case of CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE on DEER farm ~ EEE & WNV reports from AZ, & FL ~ RABIES report from OREGON ~ FOLLOW-UP REPORT: COYOTE that attacked UTAH security guard tested negative for RABIES ~ TRAVEL WARNINGS: 14 new cases of MALARIA reported in GREECE.

Whitetailed Deer. Photo by ForestWander. Wikimedia Commons.

Pennsylvania 10/11/12 mcall.com: The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today confirmed the first positive case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in the state on a deer farm in Adams County. The disease is fatal in deer, elk and moose, but there is no evidence that CWD can be transmitted to humans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The World Health Organization. The positive sample was taken from a white-tailed deer at 1491 New Chester Rd., New Oxford, and tested as part of Pennsylvania’s intensive CWD monitoring efforts. The sample tissue was tested at the Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg and verified at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. In addition to the Adams County location, the department has quarantined two farms directly associated with the positive deer at 6464 Jacks Hollow Rd., Williamsport, Lycoming County, and 61 Pickett Rd., Dover, York County. The quarantine prevents movement of animals on and off the premises. – For complete article see http://blogs.mcall.com/outdoors/2012/10/first-case-of-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-confirmed-in-pennsylvania.html

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) & West Nile Virus (WNV):

Arizona 10/11/12 Mohave County: Health officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the county so far this year in a Mohave Valley man in his 70s. – See http://www.mohavedailynews.com/articles/2012/10/11/news/local/doc50766f70adfa3869294419.txt

Florida 10/11/12 Hernando County: Health officials announced Thursday that one of its sentinel chickens has tested positive for the EEE. The chicken is located in the northwest corner of the county, off Zebrafinch Ave. west of U.S. 19. The result means mosquitoes carrying the virus are present in the area. – See http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2012/10/11/hernando_chicken_tes.html

Rabies:

Oregon 10/10/12 Benton County: Health officials have confirmed that a bat tested positive for rabies. This is the third positive bat for rabies in the county this year. On Tuesday, Oct. 2, a woman working at a horse arena in the Philomath area scooped two bats out of a watering trough. One bat was dead and the other was alive but weak from the time in the water. Since the bats were scooped out barehanded, it was decided they should be tested for rabies. One of the bats was positive for rabies. The woman who had contact with the bat will be evaluated for receiving the post-exposure rabies vaccine. – See http://democratherald.com/news/local/third-benton-county-bat-tests-positive-for-rabies/article_20f57026-2ecb-57ee-91c6-484d6b9e9cdb.html?comment_form=true

Follow-Up Report:

(See “UTAH security guard staffing entry booth attacked by COYOTE” posted 10/10/12)

Utah 10/10/12 standard.net: Utah officials say test results are negative for rabies for a coyote that attacked a guard at a Kennecott Utah Copper site in Salt Lake City. Leslie McFarlane of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources says the rabies test came back negative Wednesday, but a necropsy to determine any other signs of illness in the coyote is still pending. Results of the necropsy are expected sometime next week. – See http://www.standard.net/stories/2012/10/10/coyote-attack-called-strange
Travel Warnings:

Greece 10/11/12 cdc.gov: The CDC has received information that there have been 14 additional P. vivax malaria cases identified in Greece; four that are locally-acquired cases in Greek residents with no previous travel, and 10 cases in immigrants. Those 10 cases could have either been imported or acquired locally. Between Jan 1 and Oct 1, 2012, Greece has reported a total of 70 cases of malaria. Of those, 54 were caused by P. vivax (12 are locally acquired, 2 are relapses, and 40 occurred in immigrants). Those among immigrants from P. vivax-endemic countries could have either been imported or acquired locally. The immigrants reported being in Greece from as short as a few days before onset of symptoms to as long as 4 years before the onset of symptoms.

Three of the new cases occurred in areas where malaria had not been previously identified. (see map)  The first occurred in an agricultural setting in Selino, Xanthi. The second case was in a patient who travelled within Greece, and was believed to have become infected with malaria in Viotia. The third case occurred in a patient from Karditsa. The fourth new case had onset of symptoms at the end of Sep and is believed to have acquired the infection in Evrotas in the Laconia (southeastern Peloponnese) region. The agricultural area of Evrotas was the principal site of the 2011 P. vivax outbreak and was also where other locally-acquired were identified in Jun, Jul, and Aug of 2012. No new cases have been reported in Markopoulo and Marathon, two areas were cases had been identified during Jun through Aug.  No locally transmitted malaria cases have been reported in Athens.

AVIAN MALARIA spreads north into ALASKA ~ EHD killing DEER in more than 40 INDIANA counties ~ COYOTE reports from IL, & CANADA: BC ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from CA, MA, & RI ~ RABIES reports from CT, & MD.

Black-capped Chicadee. Photo by Algonquin Provincial Park. Ontario, Canada. Wikimedia Commons.

Alaska 09/21/12 chicagotribune.com: by Yereth Rosen – Malaria is infecting birds as far north as Alaska’s interior, and a rapidly warming climate may be the reason the mosquito-borne disease appears to be advancing northward, a new study shows. It is the first time scientists have detected the transmission of avian malaria in local birds at such far-north latitudes anywhere in North America, said the study, published on Wednesday in the scientific journal PLOS One. “We now have shown that malaria is being transmitted in Alaska,” said Ravinder Sehgal, a San Francisco State University biologist and a lead researcher on the project. While tropical birds that migrate to Alaska in the summer are known to carry the disease, there had never been any documented cases of it spreading to non-migratory Alaska birds or birds newly hatched in Alaska that had not yet flown south, Sehgal said.

Longer periods of warm weather in the summer may be allowing the malaria parasite to thrive in Alaska and be transmitted by mosquitoes, Sehgal said. “The question was, how far north is it getting, and is it going to get to birds that have never expressed it?” he said. The study notes that temperatures have been increasing in the Arctic at almost twice the average global rate, and that the warming climate has changed vegetation in the far north. The study evaluated blood samples taken last year from birds in Anchorage, Fairbanks and Coldfoot, a community north of the Arctic Circle. The researchers found avian malaria in resident and hatch-year birds in Anchorage and Fairbanks, though not as far north as Coldfoot.

Dr. Ravinder Sehgal

Of 676 birds tested, 7.2 percent were found to be infected. Some of the hardest-hit birds were black-capped chickadees, Sehgal said. Of the black-capped chickadees tested in Anchorage, about 30 percent were infected. Further studies are underway to try to determine what type of mosquito might be spreading the disease, Sehgal said. It is unclear what effect avian malaria might have on the Alaska birds. For some species elsewhere, malaria transmissions are devastating, Sehgal said. Penguins, which have no natural defenses against malaria, die when they are infected in zoos, he said. Malaria also has seriously damaged bird populations in Hawaii, where non-native mosquitoes have been introduced to the habitat. But Alaskans need not fear for their health, Sehgal said. The study detected only avian malaria, which is different from the type of malaria that afflicts mammals. “Certainly, it is not going to spread to humans,” he said.

Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease:

Indiana 09/21/12 indystar.com: by Ryan Sabalow – A virus plaguing the state’s whitetail deer herds likely has spread to more than 40 Indiana counties, including Marion. But biologists say hunters and outdoor enthusiasts shouldn’t be worried about catching the disease. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources this week received lab test results confirming their suspicions that the state’s deer have increasingly been dying from epizootic hemorrhagic disease. The tests confirmed the virus in the bodies of dead wild whitetail in LaGrange, Miami, Morgan and Sullivan counties. Captive deer at farms in Adams, Marshall, Putnam and Vanderburgh counties also had it. Biologists say dead deer in more than three dozen other counties also likely succumbed to the disease, though lab testing hasn’t been done in those cases. Deer that have the disease often appear lethargic and obviously sickly. They can have blue-tinted tongues and eyes, open sores on their tongues and mouths and their hooves can start to fall off. Feverish, they often head toward water to try to cool their overheated bodies. But some deer can carry the virus and never get sick. Others, says Brian MacGowan, an extension wildlife specialist at Purdue University, can have symptoms but not die. The disease doesn’t spread from deer to deer. Rather, MacGowan says, small biting insects called midges carry the virus. The virus is an almost yearly occurrence, but drought years — like the one Indiana just went through — often spawn larger outbreaks. Typically, the virus stops spreading after the first frosts of the season kills off the midges. – For complete article see http://www.indystar.com/article/20120921/NEWS/209210352/Virus-confirmed-Indiana-deer-poses-no-danger-hunters-officials-say

Coyote Attacks:

Illinois 09/22/12 DuPage County: by Sarah Small – Two small dogs were attacked by a pack of coyotes Thursday night in Wheaton, and while one is injured but recovering, the second has gone missing, according to reports. Jake, a 12-year old silky terrier, and Floyd, a 15-month old Yorkshire terrier, were surrounded by between four and six coyotes in their backyard on Mohican Drive, near Herrick Lake in the Arrowhead Estates neighborhood, according to their owner Sue Reid. Jake was bit several times by the coyotes, but rescued by Reid. When she ran outside to break up the fight, Floyd was missing. – See http://www.mysuburbanlife.com/lisle/news/police_and_fire/x1217098945/One-dog-injured-one-missing-following-coyote-attack-in-Wheaton

Canada:

British Columbia 09/22/12 ctvnews.ca: A Kamloops man is warning people to lock up their garbage and not to feed animals after he was attacked by a coyote while riding his bike earlier this week. Mark Dal Ponte was riding his bike home from work Sunday night when noticed he was being chased by a coyote. “We’d seen the coyote around before,” said Dal Ponte. “I was joking with some coworkers that it was going to chase me home because I smelled like fried chicken and, sure enough, ten minutes later there he was.” He said the coyote bumped into him, forcing him to jump off his bike. Then the animal nipped around his heels and he managed to scare off the attacker by kicking at it. A short time after, it returned. “I got my bike between me and the coyote and kept kicking and hollering and throwing rocks,” said Dal Ponte. Eventually the coyote left permanently and a large male coyote in the area was destroyed by conservation officers. Experts said it is rare for coyotes to go after people. If they do it is usually a small child and Dal Ponte is six feet, two inches tall. Dal Ponte said people need to lock up their garbage and not feed animals, so such attacks don’t happen again.

West Nile Virus (WNV):

California 09/23/12 San Bernadino County: Health officials confirm one new human case of WNV in Chino and two others pending in the surrounding area. – See http://www.championnewspapers.com/articles/2012/09/23/news/doc505ce03e4c434408823707.txt

Massachusetts 09/22/12 Essex County: A mosquito trapped near Chebacco Lake on the east end of town in Hamilton has tested positive for WNV. – See http://hamilton-wenham.patch.com/articles/west-nile-found-in-mosquito-near-chebacco-lake-more-spraying-planned

Rhode Island 09/22/12 Providence County: State health officials have confirmed that a man in his 20s from the city of Providence has been diagnosed with WNV-related meningitis. – See http://woonsocket.patch.com/articles/health-department-reports-providence-county-west-nile-virus-infection

Rabies:

Connecticut 09/22/12 New Haven County: A raccoon that tore through a screen door,  forced its way inside a home, and attacked a dog on Friday in the Governor’s Hill Road vicinity of Oxford has tested positive for rabies. – See http://oxford-ct.patch.com/articles/oxford-urged-to-beware-after-rabid-raccoon-attacks-dog

Maryland 09/21/12 Worcester County: A groundhog (aka woodchuck) found in the Ann Drive neighborhood of Berlin has tested positive for rabies. This is the 15th case of rabies confirmed in the county this year. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20120922/NEWS/309220013/Rabid-groundhog-found-Berlin-neighborhood

Lone WOLF OR-7 at last report still in CALIFORNIA ~ WASHINGTON to kill pack of GRAY WOLVES ~ GEESE may have key to treating diseases from MALARIA to WEST NILE VIRUS ~ RABIES reports from FL, & MT ~ CDC REPORTS: ZOONOTIC DISEASE summary for week ending September 15, 2012.

Gray wolf. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Follow-Up Report:

California 09/22/12 redbluffdailynews.com: by Julie Zeeb – The famous Oregonian that waltzed into California in December 2011 and has been border-hoping ever since is back in Tehama County. The gray wolf, known as OR-7, has mostly been in California the last few months, primarily in Plumas County, according to a California Department of Fish and Game blog dedicated to his comings and goings. The three-year-old wolf was last in Tehama County on July 31 and except for one day spent in Butte County has been in various areas of Plumas County, moving from the western area of the county into Tehama County on Sept. 19*. OR-7 is the first and only wolf to have been sighted in California since 1924, first visiting Tehama County for a few days on July 21.

*Author’s Note: According to the latest California Department of Fish & Game satellite reading, OR-7 was in eastern Tehama County on September 20, 2012.

Washington 09/21/12 seattletimes.com: by Shannon Dininny – Washington officials announced plans Friday to kill a pack of at least eight gray wolves that have been attacking livestock in the state’s northeast corner. The move is likely to anger some conservation groups and deal a setback to wolf recovery efforts, though state officials said the step was necessary for sustainable, long-term wolf recovery in the region. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said two teams were in the field Friday to try to kill members of the Wedge Pack, which ranges over a remote area of northern Stevens County. Marksmen would hunt the wolves from the ground, and if those efforts were unsuccessful, they might use helicopters to aid their hunt, Director Phil Anderson said in a statement. The pack is believed to have killed or injured at least 15 cattle from the Diamond M herd that grazes in a large area near the Canadian border, according to the statement. Those attacks have become increasingly more frequent since July, even after the agency killed a non-breeding member of the pack in August, and experts believe the wolves have become dependent on cattle for food. – For complete article see http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2019227092_apwawashingtonwolves1stldwritethru.html

Research & Development:

Global 09/21/12 wdtn.com: by Neil Carlson – Sometimes we find the cure for disease where we’d least expect it. In this case, geese could hold the key to treating everything from malaria to rabies. It all started out as a research project to develop a serum to protect people from a pesky outdoor nuisance and the disease it can carry: the West Nile virus. Mosquitoes can pick up the virus from diseased birds and transfer it to humans. Researchers found that geese can rapidly produce the antibodies needed to create serums to treat people for West Nile disease.

But, what’s most amazing is that researchers found geese can be used to produce serums to treat all kinds of diseases. “And we have gone into researching its use of their antibodies for dengue fever, for pandemic influenza, malaria, rabies,” said Richard Glynn, researcher with Avianax. “We’re also working with a group on cancer.” Researchers introduce the dead virus of any given disease to a goose. The goose then quickly produces an antibody to that disease, which is extracted from its egg yolk and used to create the serum to treat that disease.

David Bradley, University of North Dakota

“What’s really exciting about this is the goose provides a platform and produces antibodies rapidly to a variety of viruses — probably toxins, maybe even cancers,” said medical student David Bradley. It’s all amazing, heady stuff that’s being reviewed by the FDA. Who knows? We may all find that one day geese are the answer to many of mankind’s medical problems. All of this still depends on approval for human use by the FDA. However, the government is interested in this research because it could be used to quickly develop vaccines for biological agents spread by terrorists.

Rabies:

Florida 09/21/12 Bay County: A raccoon killed at the intersection of N. 9th Plaza and Lake Drive in Parker has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.wmbb.com/story/19605639/rabid-raccoon-found-in-parker

Montana 09/21/12 Gallatin County: A Bozeman family is looking for the owner of a border collie involved in a biting incident at 4:40 p.m. Wednesday at the East Gallatin Recreational Area. Walker VanHouten, 16, was running with the Bozeman Hawks cross-country team when a border collie bit him on his calf. VanHouten did not realize he should check with the owner for proof of rabies vaccination. VanHouten will have to go through rabies injections if the dog owner does not come forward by Tuesday. The dog owner should contact Kathleen VanHouten at 585-7944 or vanhoutens3@wispwest.net.

CDC Reports:

CDC MMWR Summary for Week ending September 15, 2012:

Published September 21, 2012/ 61(37); ND-508-ND-521

Anaplasmosis . . . 23 . . . Florida, Maine (2), New York (15), North Carolina (4), Rhode Island,

Babesiosis . . . 8 . . . New York (8),

Brucellosis . . . 1 . . . California,     

Ehrlichiosis . . . 14 . . . Maine, North Carolina (11), Tennessee, Virginia,

Giardiasis . . . 218 . . . Alabama (2), Alaska (2), Arkansas (3), California (42), Delaware, Florida (22), Idaho (3), Iowa (3), Maine (8), Maryland (8), Michigan (3), Missouri (3), Montana, Nebraska (6), Nevada, New York (47), Ohio (19), Oregon (6), Pennsylvania (13), South Carolina (5), Vermont (7), Washington (9), Wisconsin, Virginia (3),

HME/HGE Undetermined . . . 1 . . . Indiana,

Lyme Disease . . .  156. . .  Florida (6), Maine, Maryland (18), Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey (2), New York (67), Ohio (2), Pennsylvania (38), Rhode Island (3), Texas (2), Vermont (4), Virginia (10), Washington,

Q Fever (Acute) . . . 5 . . . Alaska, Nebraska (2), New York, Ohio

Rabies (Animal) . . . 49. . . Maine (2), Nevada (3), New York (16), Ohio, Texas, Utah (2), Vermont (2), Virginia (21), West Virginia,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Confirmed) . . . 1. . . Ohio,

Spotted Fever including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Probable) . . . 42 . . . Alabama (3), Florida, Indiana (3), New York, North Carolina (18), Tennessee (9), Virginia (7),

Tularemia . . . 1 . . . Nebraska.

MONTANA camper mauled by BLACK BEAR in wilderness area ~ EHD VIRUS killing DEER across NEBRASKA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS reports from ME, & KY ~ RABIES reports from FL, NYx2, NCx2, & VA ~ TRAVEL WARNING: MALARIA outbreak in GREECE.

Black bear. Photo by Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Montana 09/14/12 missoulian.com: by Tristan Scott – Wildlife officials have killed the black bear that they believe mauled a man who was camping deep in the heart of the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area on Friday. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Regional Supervisor Jim Satterfield said the unidentified man was injured at about 7:30 a.m. Friday in the Black Bear Creek area. The man was flown to Kalispell Regional Medical Center by ALERT helicopter and is expected to recover. Satterfield said a team of wildlife agents flew into the remote area by helicopter to track down the animal, which they spotted 30 yards from the injured man’s campsite. The bear had pepper spray on its fur and blood in its claws, he said. “We are very confident that we killed the offending bear,” he said. “We still have to analyze its stomach contents and wait on a DNA analysis to be 100 percent sure, but with the evidence we have we are very confident.” Although Satterfield did not immediately have a detailed narrative of the circumstances of the attack, he said the bear apparently entered the man’s campsite and attacked. – For complete article see http://missoulian.com/news/local/wildlife-agents-kill-black-bear-after-it-attacks-man-in/article_750aa8e8-feb7-11e1-89f8-001a4bcf887a.html

Lincoln 09/14/12 sfgate.com: The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission says a viral disease has spread to deer populations across much of Nebraska. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease spreads from deer to deer by the bite of a small insect known as a midge. Game and Parks says the virus is suspected in the reported deaths of more than 2,200 Nebraska deer this year. The disease causes hemorrhaging within the deer’s body. Deer suffering from the virus may develop a high fever and seek water, which is why many deer killed by the disease are found in or near water. The disease is not a threat to humans. The commission wants people to report to their nearest Game and Parks office any deer deaths that may be attributed to this disease.

West Nile Virus (WNV):

Maine 09/14/12 York & Cumberland counties: Health officials have confirmed that mosquitoes infected with WNV have been trapped in Biddeford and in Scarborough. Earlier, infected mosquitoes were also found in the Cumberland County towns of Gorham and Standish. – See http://www.pressherald.com/news/west-nile-virus-detected-in-biddeford-and-scarborough_2012-09-14.html

Kentucky 09/14/12 Barren County: Officials have confirmed that a horse that died in the county this week tested positive for WNV. – See http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/local/west-nile-virus-case-confirmed-in-animal/article_5768b804-fe8d-11e1-9f48-001a4bcf887a.html

Rabies:

Florida 09/13/12 Sneads, Jackson County: A raccoon that was killed by two dogs on Davis Street has tested positive for rabies. The dogs have been euthanized. – See http://www2.jcfloridan.com/news/2012/sep/13/rabid-raccoon-found-sneads-ar-4537190/

New York 09/14/12 Jay, Essex County: A raccoon found wandering in the hamlet of Upper Jay this week has tested positive for rabies. – See http://pressrepublican.com/0100_news/x550071689/Rabid-raccoon-discovered-in-Essex-County

New York 09/13/12 Orangetown, Rockland County: The Pearl River School District sent out a request Thursday morning for help in finding a dog that bit an 11-year-old boy Tuesday afternoon on Orangeburg Road. The incident happened between Noyes St. and Mapleshade Ave. at approximately 2:45 p.m. The description of the dog’s owner is a female with dark hair wearing a grey sweatshirt and khaki pants. The dog was described as brown as small-to-medium with brown and black fur. The child would have to go through a series of rabies shots as a precaution unless the owner can be found and the dog’s vaccination record can be checked. With any information, contact Orangetown Police Officer Fitzgibbons at (845) 359-3700 ext. 3180.

North Carolina 09/13/12 New Hanover County: Health officials confirmed that two raccoons tested positive for rabies within the past several days, bringing the number of rabies cases in the county to 17 so far this year. The 16th was a raccoon found Sept. 7th on Splitbrook Court in Wilmington, and the 17th was a raccoon that fought with a dog on Rockhill Road in Castle Hayne on Sept. 11th. – See http://www.starnewsonline.com/article/20120913/ARTICLES/120719584

North Carolina 09/13/12 Bettie, Carteret County: Five people are being treated for exposure to rabies after a kitten tested positive for the virus. The stray kitten was found along the side of the road and was taken to a private home to be cared for, but it was acting sick and lethargic so it was taken a veterinarian who suspected rabies. Two individuals who found the cat, and three additional people, reported being scratched, bitten, and exposed to the kitten’s saliva. – See http://www.jdnews.com/articles/kitten-108287-carteret-positive.html

Virginia 09/13/12 Fairfax County: A beaver that was reported acting aggressively toward children at the Hidden Pond Nature Center in West Springfield on Sept. 8th has tested positive for rabies. In a separate incident, a raccoon seen acting aggressively in the vicinity of the 6300 block of Lakeview Drive in Lake Barcroft has also tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2012/sep/13/rabid-beaver-chases-children-springfield/

Travel Warning:

Greece 09/14/12 cdc.gov: Outbreak Notice – As of August 5, 2012, 8 cases of malaria have been reported from the Attica and Laconia regions of Greece. Cases have occurred in the cities of Marathon, Markopoulo, and Evrotas. No cases have been reported in Athens. The Hellenic (Greek) CDC and the European CDC are improving surveillance for malaria cases. – For further details see http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/outbreak-notice/malaria-greece-sept-2012.htm