Tag Archives: rodents

BLACK BEAR attacks FLORIDA teenager ~ TEXAS reports fifth HANTAVIRUS case this year ~ NEW YORK scientists develop VACCINE to fight CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE ~ LYME DISEASE cases in NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND remain high.

Black bear. Photo by Cephas. Wikimedia Commons.

Black bear. Photo by Cephas. Wikimedia Commons.

Florida 12/21/14 mypanhandle.com provided by FL Fish & Wildlife: A 15-year-old is currently undergoing surgery after being attacked by a bear in Eastpoint, Florida. According to her mother the teenager sustained significant injuries to her legs, back, neck and face and was transported to Bay Medical Sacred Heart in Panama City. “Even as I sit here now I can’t believe what happened,” said Sherry Mann, the girl’s mother. “The bears are all over the place and I know how hard I would fight to protect my kids, but a momma bear can do so much more damage than me with just one swipe.” Mann says her daughter was walking her dog by the Big Top Supermarket off Highway 98 when she says she saw a dark shadow and then black. She says her daughter was dragged into a nearby ditch by the bear and tried screaming for help. Sherry Mann said her daughter Leah Reeder remembered to “play dead” and as she did her dog came to her rescue lunging at the animal. The bear retreated to the nearby woods and Reeder was able to walk home to her father’s house, which was a block away. “The worst injuries are to her face,” said Mann. “She has a huge laceration on top of her head and one across her forehead and deep, deep puncture wounds to the side of her head.” As of midnight Monday morning Reeder had been in surgery nearly two hours. – See http://www.mypanhandle.com/story/d/story/15-year-old-reportedly-attacked-by-bear-in-east-po/13441/COd76GVsPkK409SP2VqWJw

HANTAVIRUS:

rodents.44k498Texas 12/22/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS)is reporting a case of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) in a resident of the Golden Crescent region along the central Texas coast. This is the fifth case of hantavirus this year in the state. Hantavirus is carried by certain species of rats and mice that shed the virus in their urine, droppings and saliva. The virus can be transmitted to people by stirring up nesting materials or contaminated dust, allowing the virus to be breathed in by humans. Cases have been linked to cleaning out buildings where rodents live and working in dusty environments like ranches and oilfields . . . A total of 43 HPS cases have been confirmed in Texas since 1993, the first year the disease was detected. Of those, 14 were fatal. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/texas-reports-5th-hantavirus-case-of-2014/

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE:

white_tail_doeGlobal 12/21/14 medicalxpress.com: Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere say that a vaccination they have developed to fight a brain-based, wasting syndrome among deer and other animals may hold promise on two additional fronts: Protecting U.S. livestock from contracting the disease, and preventing similar brain infections in humans. The study, to be published in Vaccine online Dec. 21, documents a scientific milestone: The first successful vaccination of deer against chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal brain disorder caused by unusual infectious proteins known as prions. Prions propagate by converting otherwise healthy proteins into a disease state.

jjg8877gEqually important, the researchers say, this study may hold promise against human diseases suspected to be caused by prion infections, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru, familial insomnia, and variably protease-sensitive prionopathy. Some studies also have associated prion-like infections with Alzheimer’s disease. “Now that we have found that preventing prion infection is possible in animals, it’s likely feasible in humans as well,” says senior study investigator and neurologist Thomas Wisniewski, MD, a professor at NYU Langone. CWD afflicts as much as 100 percent of North America’s captive deer population, as well as large numbers of other cervids that populate the plains and forests of the Northern Hemisphere, including wild deer, elk, caribou and moose. There is growing concern among scientists that CWD could possibly spread to livestock in the same regions, especially cattle, a major life stream for the U.S. economy, in much the same manner that bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or Mad Cow Disease, another prion-based infection, spread through the United Kingdom almost two decades ago. – See http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-successful-vaccination-mad-cow-like-disease.html

LYME DISEASE:

green-tick-logoNew England 12/21/14 bostonglobe.com: by Patrick Whittle – Environmental factors and improved reporting methods led to another year of high totals for Lyme disease in northern New England. Reported cases are expected to be on par with, or exceed, records set recently in Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire. Maine is likely to exceed last year’s record of 1,384 cases of the tick-borne illness, said Sheila Pinette, director of the state’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Vermont officials said their state is on track for its second- or third-highest total on record, following the 2013 high of 671. In New Hampshire, officials said numbers are falling in line with recent years, which included a record in 2013. – For complete article see http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/12/21/numerous-reports-lyme-disease-new-england/IxOdrlSz0P8MQjQu2U8t7J/story.html

Invasive MOSQUITO threatens southern CALIFORNIA with exotic viruses ~ CALIFORNIA county issues HANTAVIRUS ALERT ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE reports third HUMAN CASE of EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE) and second EEE fatality ~ GEORGIAN scratched by RABID STRAY CAT.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Aedes Aegypti or Yellow Fever Mosquito. Courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.

California 10/16/14 capitalpress.com: Officials have confirmed that the black-and-white striped Aedes aegypti or yellow fever mosquito was found last week in Commerce and Pico Rivera east of Los Angeles. Last year the species was found in other parts of the state including the Central Coast and Central Valley. The mosquito is aggressive, is active during daylight hours, and is capable of transmitting the yellow, dengue and chikungunya fever viruses, though none of these diseases have been reported in Los Angeles County. – See http://www.capitalpress.com/California/20141016/yellow-fever-mosquito-reaches-southern-california

HANTAVIRUS:

Deer mouse

Deer mouse

California 10/17/14 San Diego County News Center: Media Release – A North American deer mouse trapped in routine monitoring in a rural part of Fallbrook has tested positive for hantavirus, and County officials are reminding people to be careful if they ever have to clean up mice or rodent nests. The mouse was the seventh rodent caught this year in the county to test positive for hantavirus, a disease that can be fatal. People have very little chance of being exposed to hantavirus, despite the fact that it is common in San Diego County, as long as wild rodents stay in the wild and don’t get inside homes, garages, sheds and cabins. However, people can be exposed if they sweep or vacuum places where infected rodents have nested. That’s because hantavirus can be inhaled if people disturb areas where dust from infected rodents, dried saliva, urine or feces can be “kicked up” into the air. “The best way to protect yourself is to avoid exposure,” said County Department of Environmental Health Director Elizabeth Pozzebon. “But if you have to clean an area where rodents have been don’t sweep or vacuum. Use wet-cleaning methods.” – For complete article and precautions see http://www.countynewscenter.com/news/deer-mouse-fallbrook-tests-positive-hantavirus

EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS (EEE):

eee-threat-249x187New Hampshire 10/15/14 NH Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials confirm the third human case of EEE in an adult resident of Manchester in Hillsborough County. The individual died in mid-September and is the second EEE-related fatality in the state so far this year. – See http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/media/pr/2014/10-oct/10152014eeecase.htm

RABIES:

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAGeorgia 10/17/14 Madison County: A stray cat that scratched the owner of property located in the 80 block of Gatewood Drive in Colbert on Oct. 4th has tested positive for rabies. – See http://www.madisonjournaltoday.com/archives/7241-Colbert-woman-scratched-by-rabid-cat.html

BEAR kills researcher in WYOMING ~ Follow-Up Report: CALIFORNIA officials kill MOUNTAIN LION that attacked young boy ~ Another NEW MEXICAN contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ VERMONTER contracts HANTAVIRUS ~ 2 COLORADANS test positive for TULAREMIA ~ Travel Warning: 113 deaths in CARIBBEAN region attributed to CHIKUNGUNYA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) report from IL ~ RABIES reports from CT, MD, SC & TX.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Wyoming 09/15/14 go.com: by Bob Moen – A 31-year-old Utah man doing research alone in a remote backcountry area has died in a bear attack in the Bridger-Teton National Forest in northwest Wyoming. Officials aren’t certain yet what type of bear killed Adam Thomas Stewart of Virgin, Utah. “I’m assuming grizzly, but we don’t have the bear so I can’t say for certain,” Fremont County Coroner Ed McAuslan said Monday. “At this particular time we’re still putting stuff together.” Fremont County Undersheriff Ryan Lee said Stewart was in a remote area checking on a research plot when he failed to return as expected on Sept. 5. He was reported missing on Sept. 7, prompting a search. His body was found last Friday between his campsite and the research plot, Lee said.

washakie-wilderness01.gifStewart last contacted his employer on Sept. 4 from a trailhead, he said. Lee didn’t have the name of the company Stewart worked for. “It was a very short trip. It was basically an in and out type thing with at least one overnight stay,” Lee said. Stewart’s camp was found intact about 3 miles from where his body was found, he said. Lee and McAuslan declined to release what details led them to believe it was a bear attack. Jason Hunter, a regional supervisor with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, said investigators saw signs of both grizzly and black bears in the area where Stewart’s body was found. – For complete article see http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/bear-attack-wyoming-kills-utah-man-25517661

Follow-Up Report:

Mountain Lion:

s_mountain-lion-0002(See CALIFORNIA child attacked by MOUNTAIN LION posted Sept. 13, 2014)

California 09/12/14 kcra.com: Officials say DNA testing has confirmed that a 74-pound, 2-year-old mountain lion shot and killed on Sept. 10th is the same one that attacked a young boy on a hiking trail near Cupertino on Sept. 7th. The lion was treed before being shot just about 130 yards from the attack site. – See http://www.kcra.com/news/tests-show-slain-mountain-lion-attacked-boy-in-bay-area/28032766

Hantavirus:

Deer mouse.

Deer mouse.

New Mexico 09/17/14 NM Dept of Health: Media Release – A 50-year-old man from San Juan County is hospitalized with laboratory confirmed Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). This is the fourth case of Hantavirus in New Mexico this year. An environmental investigation will be conducted at the home of the patient to help reduce the risk to others. “This case is another reminder that Hantavirus is present in deer mice in New Mexico,” said Department of Health Cabinet Secretary Retta Ward, MPH. “I want all New Mexicans to make sure they follow our prevention guidelines to keep themselves and their families safe from Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.” – See http://nmhealth.org/news/disease/2014/9/?view=136

Vermont 09/16/14 VT Dept of Health: Media Release – An out-of-state resident who was cleaning a poorly ventilated seasonal home last month contracted hantavirus. It’s most likely that the victim was exposed to rodent droppings that often carry the virus, which can become airborne during the cleaning process and cause a life-threatening respiratory illness. About one-third of those who contract hantavirus do not survive. – See http://healthvermont.gov/news/2014/091614_hantavirus.aspx

Tularemia:

Colorado 09/16/14 El Paso County Public Health: Media Release – A dead rabbit found south of Highway 94 and west of Yoder has tested positive for tularemia, also known as rabbit fever. – See http://www.elpasocountyhealth.org/news/news-release/2014/tularemia-found-baq4ijctzixmuu7acvc5eastern-el-paso-county-wild-rabbit

Colorado 09/18/14 Boulder County Dept of Health: Media Release – A Louisville resident has tested positive for tularemia after exposure to a dead rabbit while walking with her dog near Coyote Run Open Space in Louisville. The resident had a small cut on her knee, where the tularemia bacteria are thought to have entered her body. The resident was seen by multiple doctors after experiencing swollen lymph nodes, abdominal pain, and pain in the front of her knee. She developed a high fever, headache, and general malaise and was admitted to the hospital. Her condition has greatly improved, and she is recovering at home. This is the second Boulder County resident to test positive for the tularemia this year; nine people have tested positive for the disease in Colorado. In most of the cases, people were exposed to the disease while participating in outdoor activities, such as mowing or recreating in areas where sick or dead wildlife were present. – See http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/bc12.aspx?articleid=4212&zoneid=5

Travel Warning:

716ed7c4d80f74Caribbean Basin 09/15/14 foxnews.com: At least 113 people have died in the Americas, with all the fatalities reported in the Caribbean region, after becoming infected with the Chikungunya virus, the Pan American Health Organization, or PAHO, said, adding that it was not yet clear if these deaths were directly attributable to the virus. In its latest report, which includes figures as of Sept. 12, the PAHO confirmed 55 deaths linked to the virus in Martinique since last December, when the disease was first detected in the Americas. Forty-nine deaths were reported in Guadeloupe, six in the Dominican Republic and three in St. Martin, where the virus was first found in the Americas. . . . . . A total of 644,686 suspected and 9,640 confirmed Chikungunya cases have been reported in the region as of Sept. 8, the Caribbean Public Health Agency, or CARPHA, said. – See http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/health/2014/09/15/death-toll-from-chikungunya-hits-113-in-caribbean-paho-says/

West Nile Virus (WNV):

DuPage_logoIllinois 09/15/14 Dupage County Health Dept: Media Release – The first reported human case of WNV in the county has been confirmed in a male Naperville resident in his 50s. – See http://www.dupagehealth.org/news/wnvhuman2014

Rabies:

help984-05834Connecticut 09/17/14 New Haven County: by David Moran – Police are seeking the public’s help in locating a man who dropped a bat off at a local veterinarian that tested positive for rabies because they fear he may have been exposed to the virus himself. An unidentified man left a box containing a live bat at the Mount Carmel Veterinary Hospital on Whitney Avenue in Hamden on Sept. 16 and then left without giving his name. The veterinarian chose to euthanize the bat and sent it to the Connecticut Department of Public Health where it tested positive for rabies. Hamden police said it is “strongly recommended” that the man who delivered the live bat to the animal hospital immediately seek medical attention to determine if he may have contacted rabies from the animal. Police describe the man as a black male between the ages of 18 and 25, standing approximately 5’10,” with a medium build and a “Mohawk-style” haircut. Anyone with information on this individual is asked to call Hamden Animal control at 203-230-4080. – See http://www.courant.com/community/hamden/hc-hamden-rabies-outbreak-0918-20140917-story.html

Maryland 09/17/14 Worcester County: A stray cat that bit an adult on Sept.15th at the Milburn Landing campground area of the Pocomoke River State Park in Snow Hill has tested positive for rabies. The cat was described as a medium adult male, dark gray with white under its chin and belly, with four white feet. – See http://www.delmarvanow.com/story/news/local/maryland/2014/09/17/rabites-bite-worcester/15768459/

South Carolina 09/15/14 Anderson County: A stray cat in the southeastern part of the county that potentially exposed two people to rabies on Sept. 11th has tested positive for the virus. – See http://www.wyff4.com/news/stray-cat-exposes-two-people-to-rabies/28064590

Texas 09/17/14 Brazos County: The College Station Police Department Animal Control is investigating two dog attacks. The first victim says she was visiting a store in the 1900 block of Texas Ave Saturday evening when she was bitten by a dog. The dog was described as being brown and fluffy, medium in help-desk545451size, and of unknown gender and breed. She was not able to describe the dog’s owner.

The second attack happened Monday afternoon. The victim said she was at the dog park on Rock Prairie Road with her two dogs. When one of them ran towards the pond, the victim said another dog, described as a red/white male pit bull wearing a red collar, charged at her dog and began attacking it. The victim grabbed the back legs of the pit bull to get it off her dog. The pit bull turned around and bit the woman’s right hand. Animal Control is asking for the public’s help in locating these dogs to allow for observation and rule out possible rabies exposure to the victims. Anyone with information is asked to contact College Station Police Department Animal Control at (979)764-3600.

Study suggests SEAL VIRUS H3N8 is a threat to humans ~ PENNSYLVANIA child dies of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER ~ BLACK BEAR trees WASHINGTON BOW HUNTER ~ Follow-Up Report: WEST VIRGINIA BEAR sow judged NOT GUILTY ~ COLORADO child contracts TULAREMIA ~ COLORADO confirms third & fourth human cases of TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) reports from FL, MS & NE ~ RABIES reports from NJ & ND.

Atlantic Harbor Seal. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife.

Atlantic Harbor Seal. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife.

National 09/05/14 breitbart.com: by William Bigelow – The scientific journal Nature Communications has published the results of a study conducted by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital that focused on an avian influenza virus that left harbor seals dead along the New England coast, and their findings indicate that the virus poses a threat to humans. The H3N8 virus that killed the seals was found spreading through ferrets in separate cages by respiratory transmission, which 5454598is not the usual case with avian flu viruses, so scientists are worried that it could be transmitted through humans in an airborne manner. . . . Avian H3N8 was responsible for a human flu pandemic in the 1880s. There has been no evidence that the 2011 version that killed the seals resulted in human illness, but there is another virus that was transmitted from seals to humans who were in close contact with them. The study’s first author, Erik Karlsson, Ph.D., warned that surveillance of flu viruses in wild and domestic animals needs to be prioritized. . . . In the St. Jude study, two of the three animals that were exposed to H3N8 from respiratory transmission became infected with minimum symptoms. Researchers also wanted to see if humans vaccinated against seasonal flu strains were immune to the H3N8 virus; they were not. The researchers asserted, “The transmissibility of the seal H3N8 virus coupled with the apparent lack of immunity makes this strain a concern.” – For complete article see http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/09/04/Seal-Virus-Threat-to-Humans

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever:

188737k8Pennsylvania 09/05/14 Dauphin County: Officials have confirmed that a child from the Harrisburg area who recently died contracted Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, which is carried by dog ticks. The disease can be severe but is rarely fatal if treatment with antibiotics begins within a few days after symptoms first appear. – For complete article see http://www.pennlive.com/midstate/index.ssf/2014/09/rocky_mountain_spotted_fever_m.html

 

Bear Attacks:

CAT SCARES BEAR TOPIXWashington 09/05/14 columbian.com: by Shari Phiel – When Longview resident Jerry Hause headed out for Monday’s bow hunting opener, he never imagined he would end up in a fight for his life with a black bear. Hause and his son Jeffrey, 26, drove into a remote, wooded area in the upper Abernathy Creek area about eight miles west of Longview in hopes of bagging deer. Hause, 60, has been hunting for decades, but he’s been a bow-hunter for only four. Hause was about to start driving game toward his son, who was waiting in a tree, when the unexpected happened. “I’d already hiked about three miles so I sat down to take a break before I tried to push some (game) back to him. I took my backpack off and sat my bow down and as I was sitting there I started looking around and … I saw a black head which I thought was a bear,” Hause said from his home Thursday. “I’ve hunted this area for 30-plus years and I’ve never seen a bear up there.” Hause said the bear appeared to be a cub and was 80 to 100 yards away. Knowing knew it’s unwise to come between a cub and its mother, he looked for a way to leave the area. “I stood up and in one motion that bear jumped out of the creek it was in and was on level ground with me. And as soon as it was on level ground it was on a dead run after me,” he said. He doesn’t know if the bear was the mother or the same bear he’d thought was a cub. Hause said he knew he wouldn’t be able to pick and aim his bow, and he wasn’t confident he could drop the 250- to 300-pound animal. His only choice, he said, was to climb the tree he had been resting against. “I knew the tree was right there, so I headed up that to get far enough up the tree that the bear couldn’t get me,” Hause said. Hause climbed several feet up into the tree. The bear followed, but Hause said he thought he was out of the bear’s reach until he looked down just as the bear bit into his left leg. “It totally amazes me how fast that bear got on me. In three seconds it was on me,” he said. Hause said the bear also tried to grab him with one of its paws and left claw marks on his leg. He said he realized he couldn’t climb any higher, so he grabbed a branch above him and held on. “I was thinking, ‘If it gets me out of this tree I’m a dead man.’ It was mad, it was growling. It was serious about what it was going to do,” Hause said. Hause pulled himself and kicked out at the bear with his other foot. Having heard on wildlife shows that sharks will sometimes stop an attack after being hit in the nose, Hause aimed for the bear’s nose. The waStateMapmaneuver seemed to work. The bear let go and dropped to the ground and then moved off. After waiting 10 minutes, Hause said he got out of the tree and began hiking back to his truck. Once he got to an area where he could make a call on his cell phone, he alerted his son and called his wife, who came and took him to PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center. He was treated and released and is expected to make a full recovery from his puncture and scratch wounds.

Washington Fish and Wildlife Sgt. Bob Weaver said the chances of encountering a bear in the woods, let alone being attacked by one, are very slim. “This is are very rare incident. It’s happened before, but it’s a very rare thing to happen,” Weaver said. Statewide, there are an estimated 25,000 to 30,000 black bears. Weaver didn’t know how many bears there are in the Cowlitz County area. – For complete article see http://www.columbian.com/news/2014/sep/05/bear-attacks-bites-bow-hunter-near-longview/

Follow-Up Report

(See: MAN and DOG attacked by BLACK BEAR sow in WEST VIRGINIA posted August 29, 2014)

dogs-must-be-leashed-sign-k-0102West Virginia 09/04/14 newsplex.com: by James Gilbert – Just a few weeks ago a Staunton man had an encounter with a bear that sent him to the hospital. When we look back at bear attacks, they seem to be more like bear defense. “These are most often not bear attacks at all. In every single one of the cases in which we are aware, there’s been a human with a dog off the leash on public land,” comments Ed Clark, Wildlife center of Virginia president. In this case of a Virginia man being attacked, his dog was off the leash and ran towards some cubs. The owner’s reaction was to ‘rescue’ his dog, and momma bear took a man running at her cubs as a threat. “The dog was described as some kind of hero, well perhaps he did in fact save the owner from more severe injuries, but it was the dog who precipitated the attack in the first place, or more technically it was the human who failed to comply with the law about keeping the dog on a leash,” states Clark, who knows how smart and mostly non-violent black bears are. Dogs must be on a leash at all times on any public land unless otherwise noted. Many dog owners know this. – For complete article and video see http://www.newsplex.com/home/headlines/Bear-Attack-Might-be-More-Than-it-Seems-274024081.html

Tularemia:

Colorado 09/03/14 Boulder County: A child in Longmont and two rodents in Boulder have tested positive for tularemia. – See http://www.timescall.com/longmont-local-news/ci_26464004/boulder-county-sees-first-human-case-rabbit-fever

_rabbit_feve_198874000Colorado 09/05/14 Larimer County: A county resident has been stricken with the third human case of tularemia in the state this year. The victim is thought to have been infected by inhaling the bacteria while mowing tall grass in an area where infected rabbits were previously present. – See http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/local/2014/09/05/second-human-case-tularemia-confirmed-larimer/15135067/

Colorado 09/06/14 Larimer County: A second resident of the county has been confirmed to have tularemia, a bacteria also known as rabbit fever. Both adults who were treated for tularemia in Larimer County are believed to have been infected while mowing tall grasses in an area frequented by rabbits. – See http://www.reporterherald.com/lifestyles/health/ci_26479036/second-human-tularemia-case-reported-locally

55468i7West Nile Virus (WNV):

Florida 09/05/14 FL Dept of Health/Volusia County: Media Release – A suspect human case of WNV illness is under investigation awaiting state lab confirmation. The case involves a 34 year old female. WNV is most commonly transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. There are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent WNV infection. – See http://www.floridahealth.gov/chd/volusia/NewsReleases/2014-wnv-extended.pdf

MS_71058_121809421211160_5406251_nMississippi 09/08/14 MS State Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed five new human cases of WNV, bringing the state total to 24 cases so far in 2014. The new cases were reported in Forrest (2), Harrison (1), and Hinds (2) counties. So far this year, human WNV cases have been reported in the following counties: Adams (2), Bolivar (1), Covington (1), Forrest (4), Harrison (1), Hinds (6), Lauderdale (1), Madison (1), Newton (1), Rankin (4), Yazoo (1), and Wilkinson (1). Three WNV deaths have occurred, in Forrest, Madison, and Yazoo counties. – See http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/23,15578,341.html

5323g446Nebraska 09/03/14 Two Rivers Public Health Dept: Media Release – Three cases of the more severe form of WNV have been confirmed within the department’s jurisdiction during the last two weeks. All of the victims have been hospitalized. – See http://www.trphd.org/Resources/PressReleases/ArticleDisplay/tabid/68/ArticleId/404/Protect-Yourself-from-West-Nile-Virus-during-Fall-Activities.aspx

Rabies:

groundhogNew Jersey 09/08/14 Middlesex County: A groundhog that appeared to be sick was found Sept. 4th in a vacant field in the vicinity of Cortland Street and Hall Avenue in Perth Amboy. Officials confirmed today that the animal tested positive for rabies. One person was potentially exposed to the virus. – See http://www.nj.com/middlesex/index.ssf/2014/09/rabid_groundhog_found_in_perth_amboy.html

3610192083_22eaf9db7aNorth Dakota 09/05/14 Ward County: A kitten that was part of a litter of six sold at Amy’s Pet Parade in Minot has tested positive for rabies. The litter was anonymously dropped off at the pet shop and the last kitten was sold this week. Officials are urging anyone exposed to the kittens since August 22nd should seek immediate medical advice. – See http://www.kentucky.com/2014/09/05/3414061_kitten-purchased-in-nd-tests-positive.html?rh=1

 

COLORADAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ Second person in SASKATCHEWAN dies of HANTAVIRUS ~ CHIKUNGUNYA cases in the CARIBBEAN top half-million mark ~ ARIZONA warns of PSITTACOSIS in LOVEBIRDS ~ RABBITS and CATS in COLORADO positive for TULAREMIA ~ WEST NILE VIRUS (WNV) numbers NATIONALLY and WNV reports from ND, SD & TX ~ Interesting RABIES cases reported in GAx2, KS, MDx2 & NJ.

Deer Mouse. Courtesy CDC.

Deer Mouse. Courtesy CDC.

Colorado 08/05/14 Eagle County: A 41-year-old man had lived in Eagle County for only two months before hantavirus killed him. Manuel Hernandez was from Mexico and was here on a work visa. His death makes him Eagle County’s first case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome since 2005, said Jennifer Ludwig, the county’s public health director. Coroner Kara Bettis said Hernandez’s manner of death was natural. He died a couple weeks ago, Bettis said. The investigation took that long because the Centers for Disease Control requires two sets of lab results to confirm a hantavirus death. “Hantavirus causes death in approximately 40 percent of cases,” Ludwig said. – For complete article and more re Hantavirus see http://www.vaildaily.com/news/12488973-113/hantavirus-rodent-areas-cases

Canada 08/05/14 Saskatchewan: An adult in the northern tier of the province has died after contracting hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. It is the second death and fourth case reported in the province so far this year. Hantavirus can be transmitted by breathing in contaminated airborne particles from the droppings, urine and saliva of infected deer mice and certain other rodents that carry the disease. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.vancouversun.com/health/Second+hantavirus+death+reported+Saskatchewan/10091160/story.html

Chikungunya Fever:

image[3]Western Hemisphere 08/04/14 cidrap.umn.edu: by Robert Roos – The tally of chikungunya cases in the Caribbean climbed by nearly 38,000 last week, topping the half million mark, with the Dominican Republic again contributing most of the increase, according to an Aug 1 update from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). The total reached 513,393 cases, compared with 473,523 a week earlier, an increase of 37,870, or 8.0%. Those numbers include suspected and confirmed illnesses that are locally acquired and imported cases. The vast majority of them—508,122 as of Aug 1—are suspected local cases. The Dominican Republic accounted for 26,012 of the new cases last week and more than half of all cases, with an overall total of 307,933, according to PAHO. Neighboring Haiti had only 50 new cases last week, all classified as suspected, for a total of 64,709. The death toll in the epidemic, which began last December, grew by 6, to 32. All 6 deaths were in Martinique, where the toll is now 19. The country’s overall case count reached 54,075, or 3,620 more than the week before. The total of confirmed local cases actually dropped by 524 last week, from 5,260 to 4,736, largely because of a decrease in French Guiana. The tally of confirmed local cases there sank from 665 to 89, while suspected cases jumped from zero to 1,194 and imported cases dropped from 216 to zero. Another Caribbean country that had a sizable jump in cases was Guadeloupe, where the total rose by 6,740, to 71,068.

joint_painIn Central America, El Salvador reported 376 new cases for a total of 2,353. Puerto Rico reported 390 new suspected cases for a total of 1,033. The numbers of confirmed and imported cases stayed the same at 215 and 17, respectively. As for the United States, PAHO listed 380 imported cases, or 18 fewer than the 398 reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Jul 30. The nation has had four locally acquired cases, all in Florida, including two reported last week. Meanwhile, imported cases in Mexico reached 380, an increase of 98, with local cases staying at 2. Venezuela reported 86 cases, with 30 local confirmed and 56 imported ones, compared with 57 a week earlier, according to PAHO. – See http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2014/08/caribbean-chikungunya-cases-climb-8-top-500000

Psittacosis:

Agapornis_-probably_a_hybrid-5iArizona 08/05/14 azcentral.com: by Chris Williams – Arizona Game and Fish Department officials want the public to be aware of a potential health threat following the discovery of the disease psittacosis, also known as parrot fever, in dead lovebirds in Scottsdale. Recently a Scottsdale homeowner reported finding 20 dead lovebirds in his yard. Game and Fish test results came in Friday, showing the birds had psittacosis. The disease can spread to humans and be difficult to diagnose. Last summer, it infected an east Mesa woman who used a leaf blower to clean up after some messy lovebirds, according to Game and Fish. She came down with a mysterious respiratory condition doctors had a tough time figuring out. When Game and Fish discovered psittacosis in dead birds on her property, that gave doctors the information they needed to diagnose her. – For complete article and precautions see http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/scottsdale/2014/08/05/12news-parrot-fever-psittacosis-scottsdale/13624329/

Tularemia:

imagesCAC3YRG5Colorado 08/03/14 Montrosepress.com: Wild rabbits and two domestic cats in Montrose County have tested presumptively positive for tularemia, which can be transmitted to humans, most commonly through handling infected animals. – See http://www.montrosepress.com/news/county-warns-of-tularemia-after-cats-turn-up-positive/article_c1f3e8e8-1acd-11e4-8967-001a4bcf887a.html

West Nile Virus (WNV):

West+Nile+Virus55447National 08/01/14 outbreaknewstoday.com: by Robert Herriman – California has accounted for 33 percent of the at least 60 confirmed human West Nile virus (WNV) cases reported nationally, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The Golden State has reported 20 human WNV cases to date from the following counties: Butte (1), Contra Costa (1), Fresno (4), Kern (1), Lake (1), Orange (3), Solano (1), Stanislaus (5) and Tulare (3). . . . To date, three people have died from complications due to WNV–Arizona, Louisiana and Missouri. – For complete article see http://outbreaknewstoday.com/california-accounts-for-a-third-of-all-human-west-nile-virus-cases-99491/

North Dakota 08/05/14 ND Dept of Health: Media Release – Officials have confirmed the first human case of WNV in the state so far this year. The patient is a female in her 50s residing in Richland County. – For complete release see http://www.ndhan.gov/data/mrNews/2014-08-05-WNV%20First%20Human%20Case%202014%20NR%20-%20v%20FINAL.pdf

South Dakota 08/05/14 SD Sept of Health: Officials have confirmed 12 human cases of WNV statewide so far this year. – For details, including counties reporting one or more cases see http://doh.sd.gov/documents/diseases/WNVupdate8-5.pdf

Texas 08/06/14 TX Dept of State Health: Officials have confirmed 15 human cases of WNV statewide so far this year. Seven cases are the more severe neuro-invasive form and eight cases are the milder fever form of the disease. Montgomery County alone has reported a total of six cases. – For a list of the other eight counties reporting WNV, and more re WNV, see https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/updates.shtm

Rabies:

RabidgoatGeorgia 08/04/14 Pike County: A goat, which was part of a herd of 17 stabled on McCrary Road in Molena has tested positive for rabies. Family members have received post-exposure vaccinations. – See http://www.pikecountygeorgia.com/archives/4765-Case-of-rabies-confirmed-in-Molena.html

Looking-for-Kittens-001Georgia 08/05/14 Hall County: A cat in the Gillsville Highway area of the eastern part of the county has tested positive for rabies. Two people are being treated after being exposed to the virus. – See http://www.cbs46.com/story/26201097/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-hall-county

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAKansas 07/29/14 Lyon County: A cow stabled in the county has tested positive for rabies. – http://cjonline.com/news/2014-07-29/rabies-confirmed-lyon-county-cow

 

3610192083_22eaf9db7aMaryland 07/28/14 Wicomico County: A feral kitten that scratched a Pittsville resident on Friendship Road has tested positive for rabies. Area residents are reported to have said “the (feral) cat population has become a big problem in town.” – See http://www.wboc.com/story/26132372/rabies-clinic-scheduled-after-rabid-cat-found

help_signMaryland 07/28/14 Frederick County: (Health officials are) searching for the owner of a dog that repeatedly bit a man Saturday night in Frederick.  The incident happened Saturday, July 26, 2014 around 10 p.m. near Hillcrest Drive at Hill Street Park. The FCHD said they need to speak with the owner of the dog so that the bite victim may avoid receiving unnecessary post-exposure rabies vaccinations.  The dog is described as a brownish, medium-sized, medium hair length, possible pit bull-mix that was not leashed. The dog was wearing a collar, officials say.  Anyone who has information about the owner’s identity is asked to call the FCHD at 301-600-1717 or Frederick County Animal Control at 301-600-1544.  Human cases of rabies are fatal if untreated. If you or someone in your family is bitten or scratched by a dog or cat, you should contact FCAC for assistance.  – See http://www.your4state.com/story/d/story/man-bitten-by-dog-in-frederick-officials-search-fo/27729/sDWUr9x_M0mhe3VD1SEH0g

IMG4336e-L-001New Jersey 07/30/14 Burlington County: A kitten in the township of Medford that has tested positive for rabies has reportedly exposed at least 13 people to the virus, all of whom must now receive post-exposure prophylaxis treatment. At least three other cats and a dog were also exposed and will be quarantined for six months. – See http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/rabies-alert-issued-in-medford-after-kitten-tests-positive/article_9e211201-9ad0-5474-980d-8d7f128dfe1e.html

 

Celebrity WOLF OR-7 has fathered pups in OREGON – GRIZZLY attacks car on CANADIAN highway – TRAVEL WARNING: CDC places CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER on Level 1 Watch List in CARIBBEAN – MISSISSIPPI confirms second HUMAN case of WEST NILE VIRUS – NORTH DAKOTA confirms HANTAVIRUS fatality – RABID STRAY CATS found in NY & PA.

OR-7's pups. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

OR-7’s pups. Courtesy U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Wolf OR-7:

Oregon 06/04/14 chicoer.com: by Jeff Barnard – Oregon’s famous wandering wolf has fathered pups with a mate in the southern Cascade Range — the first confirmed wolf pack in those mountains since the 1940s, officials said today. Biologists made the determination after traveling Monday to a site on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest east of Medford, where photos and a GPS tracking collar showed the wolf known as OR-7 has been living with a mate. They saw two pups peering out from a pile of logs and may have heard more, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said. OR-7 and his mate were nowhere to be seen but could well have been nearby in the dense timber, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist John Stephenson said. “It was pretty exciting seeing the pups,” he said. “OR-7 was probably off getting some food. We saw a couple deer (and elk) legs that had obviously been getting chewed on.” Scientists also saw some ground disturbance where the pack “clearly had been playing around,” Stephenson said. The discovery marked the farthest west and south a wolf pack has established itself since the animals were reintroduced in the Northern Rockies in the 1990s, he said. – For complete article see http://www.chicoer.com/breakingnews/ci_25897080/wandering-wolf-or-7-has-fathered-pups

Canada:

Grizzly Bear:

Not related to article. For size comparison only. National Geographic image.

Not related to article. For size comparison only. National Geographic image.

Alberta 06/12/14 huffingtonpost.ca: A female resident of Jasper reported that her vehicle was attacked by a GRIZZLY when she slowed down on Highway 16 to let two bears cross in front of her car. The female decided to cross, she said, and the male stopped so she proceeded slowly between them. The male charged her car hitting it full force and rocking it violently. “I could see his teeth, the drool on his face,” she said. She told The Fitzhugh, a Jasper newspaper, she heard the bear’s claws scrape against the metal of her car as he sped away. About a kilometer down the road she stopped and could see the bears chasing after her. She told the Edmonton Journal that repairing the dents left in the car’s side panels would cost about $5,500.00. Parks Canada confirmed a similar incident about an hour earlier near the same location and they suspect the same GRIZZLY was involved.  – For complete article and video see http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/06/12/grizzly-attacks-car-jasper_n_5488751.html

Travel Warning:        

Chikungunya Fever:

chikVCaribbean06/02/14 travelweekly.com: by Gay Nagle Myers -U.S. and Caribbean health officials report that chikungunya, a viral disease spread by the bite of an infected mosquito, now has reached 17 Caribbean countries with 4,406 confirmed cases and more than 103,000 suspected cases. The mosquito-borne disease first appeared in French St. Martin in December. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that Florida has reported 10 cases coming from travelers returning from Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Martinique and St. Maarten/Martin. To date, no case has been reported of people contracting the disease in Florida, “but there is a high likelihood, as we continue to monitor and investigate, that we will find some,” according to Roger Nasci, a CDC expert on vector-borne diseases. The CDC has placedchikungunya on its Level 1 Watch List in the Caribbean, urging travelers to follow precautions. The risk to travelers “is slightly above the baseline risk,” the CDC said. – For complete article see http://www.travelweekly.com/Caribbean-Travel/Mosquito-borne-illness-spreads-in-Caribbean/

West Nile Virus:

imagesGW02ZP9VMississippi06/05/14 vaccinenewsdaily.com: A second human case of West Nile virus (WNV) in the state this year had been confirmed. The WNV case was confirmed in NewtownCounty. The first case was confirmed in HindsCounty in February. “This serves as a powerful reminder of the importance of preventing mosquito exposures, particularly as we approach the historically active summer months,” Thomas Dobbs, an epidemiologist for MSDH, said. – See http://vaccinenewsdaily.com/medical_countermeasures/330914-second-west-nile-case-confirmed-in-mississippi/

Hantavirus:

504f618286f53_preview-300North Dakota06/12/14 ND State Health Dept: State officials have confirmed the death of an adult resident due to Hantavirus, which is found in the feces and urine of rodents and can be inhaled while cleaning poorly ventilated areas. No other information was provided. – See http://www.theolympian.com/2014/06/12/3178016/death-in-central-nd-attributed.html?sp=/99/988/

Rabies:

imagesPG7OKBFQNew York06/06/14ErieCounty: An apparently ill feral cat found by children on Cedar Road in Newstead has tested positive for rabies. No description of the cat was provided. – See http://wivb.com/2014/06/06/cat-tests-positive-for-rabies/

Pennsylvania06/06/14AdamsCounty: A feral cat that attacked a woman in the 400-block of Sibert Road in StrabanTownship has tested positive for rabies. No description of the cat was provided. – See http://www.gettysburgtimes.com/news/local/article_0098850e-2937-5739-bcc2-97ac223bc623.html

 

 

 

 

 

CANADIAN biker survives GRIZZLY attack when bear punctures can of pepper spray ~ OKLAHOMA’s first case of HEARTLAND VIRUS proves fatal ~ NEW HAMPSHIRE has highest incidence of LYME DISEASE ~ COLORADO confirms third case of HANTAVIRUS this year ~ OKLAHOMA confirms first case of HANTAVIRUS this year proves fatal ~ RABIES report from OHIO.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Grizzly. Bing free use license.

Canada:

Alberta 05/25/14 660news.com: A well-prepared mountain biker is recovering with minor injuries after a grizzly bear attack in Alberta. It happened Saturday night around 9:00 p.m. just outside the town of Jasper. Parks Canada Spokesperson Kim Weir said the cyclist was riding on a trail when he was charged by the bear and knocked off his bike. Fortunately when the biker was face down, there was a can of bear spray on his backpack. “So the bear actually pepper-spray-bearbit into the bear spray, punctured the can, the bear spray was deployed, the bear got it into his mouth and his eyes and so on and left the area,” she said. “The mountain biker had a cell phone so he then called for help.” Weir reminds all trail users in the mountains be make noise, to let wildlife know they are nearby. She added at this time of year, it’s also a good idea to avoid the trails during dawn and dusk as it’s a highly active period for wildlife hunting. – See http://www.660news.com/2014/05/25/grizzly-punctures-bear-spray-can-during-attack-on-biker-and-flees/

Heartland virus:

Lone Star Tick

Lone Star Tick

Oklahoma 05/27/14 newsok.com: The Oklahoma Department of Health has confirmed the state’s first case and death of Heartland virus. The Health Department says a Delaware County resident recently died from complications of the virus. Heartland virus was first identified in Missouri in 2009. The virus is found in the Lone Star tick and is likely spread through tick bites. The Oklahoma case is only the tenth person confirmed with the virus and the second person to die from it. Other cases have occurred in Missouri and Tennessee. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, loss of appetite, nausea, bruising easily and diarrhea. All of the patients diagnosed with Heartland virus reported spending several hours per day in outside activities or occupations. There is no vaccine or drug to prevent or treat the disease. – See http://newsok.com/oklahoma-heartland-virus-death-confirmed/article/4851400 and http://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/heartland/index.html

Lyme Disease:

lyme-awareness5128New Hampshire 05/25/14 fosters.com: According to Alan Eaton, an entomologist with the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, New Hampshire has the highest incidence of Lyme disease in the country. Eaton said this is in part due to high tick populations, but also because so many people live close to or in wooded areas where ticks flourish. Eaton also said the highest incidence of Lyme Disease within the state is found in the Seacoast region. – See http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140525/GJNEWS_01/140529521/-1/FOSNEWS

Hantavirus:

imagesCA4WCXZVColorado 05/23/14 Costilla County: The third human case of hantavirus in the state this year was reported in Costilla County. Earlier this month a fatal case was reported in Rio Grande County. Two to six cases are reported in the state each year. – See http://www.koaa.com/news/hantavirus-reported-in-costilla-county/

Deer mouse. CDC.

Deer mouse. CDC.

Oklahoma 05/22/14 Texas County: by Kyle Fredrickson – A Panhandle man has died as a result of a virus commonly carried by wild rodents, according to the state Health Department. The man, who is only identified as being age 65 or older, was a Texas County resident. The state Health Department said he died of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, which has no cure, said Becky Coffman, an epidemiologist with the department. Hantavirus is carried by wild rodents, especially deer mice, found in Oklahoma and southwest portions of the U.S. It’s transmitted to humans by touch or inhalation of virus particles shed by its host through fecal matter, urine and saliva. Data show it is most often contracted when people in rural areas are maintaining buildings with high rodent activity. – See http://newsok.com/oklahoma-panhandle-resident-dies-as-result-of-virus-carried-by-wild-rodents/article/4846191

Rabies:

Raccoon cub.

Raccoon cub.

Ohio 05/28/14 Westchester County: Someone left five well-fed baby raccoons on the doorstep of the Westchester County, N.Y., Health Department on Friday, and the department said that person should call immediately to be assessed for the possibility of rabies. The month-old raccoons were delivered to the department’s office in Mount Kisco in a cage with bottles of milk, blankets and toys, the department said. “They appear to have been well cared for and nurtured, which means that there was direct contact between these raccoons and the person or people who were caring for them,” said Dr. Sherlita Amler, the county health commissioner. “That’s why it’s important that we talk to the individual or individuals who left them to determine if they may have been potentially exposed to rabies.” Raccoons are among the most-common carriers of rabies, a disease that is fatal if not quickly treated. Department spokeswoman Caren Halbfinger said that the raccoons’ caretaker needs to be asked about any bites or scratches. Officials also want to know whether the raccoons’ mother was sick. – See http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/national_world/2014/05/26/raccoons-0526-art-gj9sdmjt-1.html